Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Tex

    Tex

    Supporters


    • Points

      466

    • Content count

      6,820


  2. Rocker66

    Rocker66

    Supporters


    • Points

      357

    • Content count

      10,313


  3. PoppetM

    PoppetM

    Supporters


    • Points

      306

    • Content count

      3,124


  4. Andy m

    Andy m

    Supporters


    • Points

      243

    • Content count

      1,900



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 18/10/17 in all areas

  1. 17 points
    For the members who have a nervous disposition to scooters please don't not read any further---------Yesterday afternoon off from doing jobs--so even though it was spitting rain--I went to the Big City of Preston Del Sol-- Yamaha Agents !!! "hang on a sec"-- having trouble getting leg over --the same as several other members of this forum-- it time for looking/test riding a scooter--No J300 in stock so went for a now pouring down test ride--the paperwork took ages and ages--did you know you can only test ride up to 70 years of age !!! I was shown the keyless ignition--shown all the relevant bits--yes beer goes under seat--fags go in here--then I gave the demo bike a good check over before riding--always do this safety check--yes kicked both tyres for exact pressure--set of slowly--But after just a few yards--the scooter devil comes out in me --I'm off weaving here --filtering there--breaking speed limits--overtaking on pavements--pomping horns--leaning forward and head down--just like all the proper scooter riders do--it was quite exciting--I couldn't see for most of the time because of steamed up visor--but never mind --not important--got back to garage--absolutely soaked through and through--like a drowned rat--walked in like John Wayne after getting off his horse--the seat on scooter is so wide--stopping at lights--very unsafe--could just about touch the floor on tiptoes--that was the only thing I could fault the scooter on for me--and I'm 6'6"--sorry 5'9". A stupid low price offered for my bike--so no point in part exchanging--£9635 otr asking price--£500 deposit £41.71 month 36 months--seems ok --- but not for me. Will give you a ring when we get the J300 in to test ride--ok thanks--- hit all the works traffic getting home--crazy drivers--huge puddles everywhere--cars swerving around them it was chaos--but I was glad to back on my NC750S to be able to put both feet firmly on the ground--and ride properly --sensibly like all good motorbikers should. Home took all wet rags off outside --neighbours are used to seeing me nacked by now--the kids just throw stone at me and shout abuse--but the wobbly old woman will not let me in-house until naked as a jaybird---- just got in the lovely hot shower and my mobile phone rang--she answered it--shouted up it's Chris--who's ****** Chris? The ****** Chris wants to know why you did not leave the keyless ignition--key thingy you put safely in the top pocket of jacket!!! how would I ??remember that--so do you--ME--want to take it back now his manager is going apeshit not leaving it?? ****** No-- I will bring it back tomorrow --so I think I may be banned from yet another bike shop--never mind still a few unguarded and unaware ones left for me to play with.
  2. 13 points
    So yesterday afternoon, I had the pleasure of test riding a Tri-colour DCT Africa Twin. All sorts of roads, fast, slow, twisty, dual carriageway, town riding. An awful lot has been written about this bike, mainly very positive. I had never ridden DCT before, my NC is manual so that was also of interest to me. Nationally I think it's about 50:50 manual:DCT. Smiths Honda in Chester are "top of the league" with 25:75 manual:DCT. Anyway, a lot of what I will write will have been written before and the following is simply my own appraisal of the bike. Wow! What a lovely machine. It felt strong and very well balanced with an engine that is very willing to pull at all revs. And so smooth too when on the move. I tried all the modes, finding S1 to be the best for me. I found it easy to get used to DCT once I persuaded myself to be confident! It really does seem to know what's good for you. The seat was comfy for my ample posterior and the screen did it's job well. I had the seat height set to the lower of the two levels and feet could go flat. The balance of the bike was so good making the ride a complete joy. No problems with the twisties despite it's size and very stable at speed. Great riding position for me with no stress on my joints with great visibility and road presence. My only issue was with DCT and this is my personal opinion only (careful now). I don't like auto cars, I enjoy being able to change gear when I want. I know that you can override the DCT manually but I just felt that this box was not for me although it seems to be magic in how it performs most of the time. I must stress that this is simply my opinion only as so much has been spoken here before. I can fully understand why people love it. Bit snatchy in traffic around town in both D and S1 modes but lovely on the move. Needs some confidence I think on roundabouts and also in tight corners but maybe that's just my inexperience of this system. Worked fine for overtakes. Others have said it feels a bit like a bigger more powerful NC and I would have to agree that the basic character is similar. Anyway, the reason for the test ride was to see how the bike felt for my needs as I need the ability to have comfortable ( and safe ) two up riding, commuting and also long journeys with luggage, mainly to Scotland. My son is in Aberdeen. The outcome? Oops................. Trigger pulled..... Collect manual AT in Matte Ballistic Black next Tuesday. Brand new, looks absolutely mint. Love it. I had a choice of colours but love the look of the bike in the black. Very happy with the deal. Got some extras thrown in too which is always nice. Daughter (pillion) VERY VERY happy. Wife suggested that if I'd come home with a bottle of wine that might have smoothed things over a bit! I love my NC750X, it does everything I could ask of it on my own but needs change and also, I suppose, after nearly 3 years of ownership, a change of bike will be nice. What will I miss, well, without a doubt the frunk is top of the list.
  3. 8 points
    Just thought I would share a picture of my beautiful 916, it's one of the first 1994 bikes with just about every extra you can buy, and some you can't such as the WSB race ecu from 94. Oh I nearly forgot the lady is my Wife Lesley complete with handbag.
  4. 8 points
    One of the 2018 bikes I'm very interested in this one. however I would have to find a decent Kawasaki dealer as I don't want to use the one in Ashford. I would have prefered it if it had twin shocks and 4 cans like the original though https://www.kawasaki.co.uk/en/products/Z900RS/2018/Z900RS/overview?Uid=0830WFFaXVgMXVBbDVlaXApYUAkOWVsKXlgOUVEMC15QXlg
  5. 8 points
    Finally picked it up from Chester earlier today, bog standard with top box, only done 40 miles but first impressions are good, it's nippy, nimble, easy to ride and the build quality is fine, certainly better than my other Indian built bike an 05 Enfield. It's the first one out of my local dealer so don't expect to bump into another in the next few weeks, but i will get a few miles in over the week and keep any interested parties up to speed, photos when its light tomorrow.
  6. 8 points
    Talking about 'tricky' valves.. Donkey's years ago I worked for a Ducati dealer (some poor bugger had to..) and shimming the desmodromic valve gear on those (bevel gear) models wasn't that 'easy'. Andy had been on a factory course so always took it on the chin and did them. Factory time was (I think) about 3.5 hours but Andy always took 4.5 to 5. We only ever charged the 'factory rate' of 3.5 and swallowed the difference. We also never charged for the shims (providing the old ones were in good shape, we merely swopped them over). Fair enough, so far? So, one customer had moved down from London and bought his 900SS in for a full service. When I gave him the bill he 'went off on one' claiming we hadn't done the valves! I told him we had and I had seen the guy doing it. "You can't have!" he snapped "My London dealer always charged me 6 hours labour at least!" He then looked down the list of parts used and played his trump card - "And you haven't charged me for any shims!" I suggested he go through and talk to Andy in the workshop. Now, Andy was a lovely man. But didn't really look it. Big, bearded, and with the look of Fidel Castro with toothache he was, shall we say, bloody scary looking! "This is your old oil, these are your old plugs, there's your old oil filter and there are the shims I took out and replaced with new ones!" I took enormous pleasure in suggesting he go back to London for services in future..
  7. 8 points
    As some of you know, I replaced my Triumph Daytona (body would'nt take the strain) with a CRF250 Rally for travelling and nipping about on. I've had it a couple of months and clocked up 2000 miles today, and I've got a quite few minutes so I thought I'd share a few opinions on the last 2000 miles. So what have I changed? Wound up the preload at the rear, definitely improved the sag and personal comfort. Fitted my satnag, easy job, having built my own auxiliary loom with a switched power supply through a standard Relay and an old 6 fuse fusebox I had kicking about. Fitted a rear rack from a trusted dealer in Thailand, half the price of the same item in the UK, delivered to my door. And that's it. The seat is still fine for about 120 miles and after a quick walk round it's fine for the same again. Might try a real sheepskin cover that I can make to fit. Wind and weather protection from the screen is pretty good, even at motorway speeds. It's very stable, even in crosswinds, but it gets filthy quick, a function of the clearance of the mudguards (poorly named) over the wheels. The engine is pretty nippy considering it's low power (nice pick up around 6500 revs) and has improved a good bit over the 2000 mikes, especially at lower revs. The gearbox is excellent, it doesn't even clunk into first, and all the controls are sooo light. Real fuel consumption is always over 80 mpg, with over 90 easily achievable on a Bimble. Suspension works fine, ABS is fine, standard tyres are ok on the road and sort of ok off road. They're not great at either, but that's the nature of compromise. Off road it's great fun, better than me, but it's no KTM. It's a good old fashioned 250 traillie. Moaning it's not good enough for enduro is like moaning that your NC's not a Fireblade. Its so light, it's my go to bike for nipping about locally, and I've already done three trips of over 280 miles on it, including the camping weekend in the Peak District. The touring credentials will be tested next May, when I get off the ferry in Bilbao and head off for 16 days touring through France alongside a friend on a new GS1200. That includes leading a tour of the Normandy beaches for the last 7 days for my local bike club. I'm sure it will be more than adequate. Its just a good solid, well made (in Thailand) bike, capable of carrying me and my kit anywhere I'm capable of riding. It's not fast, but can maintain 70mph, but for me it's dead comfortable and just so good to ride. I know it wouldn't suit every one, especially with a 35" seat height, but I am a lanky beggar and only weigh 90 kilos max fully suited and booted. It would be rubbish two up, rear pegs are too high and rear spring just too soft. Oh, and the LED headlights are as good as the Daytona's twin light set up, they are very good indeed. Think a set of heated grips should finish it off. Looking forward to next year. Brian
  8. 7 points
    My tired old eyes tend to judge beautiful motorcycles by the standards of this handsome old fella..
  9. 6 points
    Ever since buying the NC the one thing that constantly irritated me was the, in my opinion, stupid left handlebar switch unit. I just can't get on with the indicator and horn buttons swapping positions compared to the traditional layout with the horn button below the indicator switch. More than once I've gone for the horn button and hit the indicators instead. I'll freely admit that this problem persists because I swap btween the NC and my Wing which has the old style switch layout but I've finally done something about it and have removed the left switch unit and replaced it with one from a 700 Deauville which works a treat and more importantly works the way I want it to.
  10. 6 points
    ... about 100mph? ... coat ....
  11. 6 points
    I thank you for your correction and apologise for my lack of eloquence. I intended to refer to anyone employed by a dealership who either described or found the process of adjusting the NC valve clearances as "tricky", I was not intending to imply that the average Joe in the street who knows their limitations and doesn't delve into things they know nothing of (for reward) is in any way a rock-ape. Clearly I failed to differentiate these adequately. One would hope we pay the dealer rates for expertise not because they find it tricky, I believe the latter falls into the "charlatan" category. Apologies to any person who I have offended, and all rock-apes who don't work at dealerships.
  12. 6 points
    If you truly are a “grotesquely fat b**stard”, as you claim, then you should probably leave your mirrors as they are because if they can’t squeeze between two vans, what chance does your arse have?
  13. 6 points
    I'll say it again..... If your buying a product to use as a tool, buy with your head. If your buying a product as a toy, buy with your heart.
  14. 6 points
    Bringing Gold(wing), Frankenstein (Vultus) and meeeeeawwwe(Fireblade) And the shepherds would be washing their CRF 250's Just sayin' Bri
  15. 6 points
    I took a chance and traded my R90/S for the GL1000 when they first came out which started arun of a number of Wings although I never progressed above the 1100s. I have howeveridden mist models since. If I could stil manage a big bike I would certainly consider another.I certainly had a good social life with the GWOCGB going to meets both in the UK and Europe. I was very surprised how easy the 1800 was to handle when I rode the demo. Personally I would prefer a Wing to any other big touring bike. This was my original GL1000 GL1100Aspencade Riding the 1800 Demo
  16. 6 points
    Googled images of the Kawasaki J300 scooter just to see what it looked like - got this back :-) looks very practical for work ;-) have fun...
  17. 6 points
    I bought my Integra as a ‘ride to work in all weather’ bike. As the weather deteriorated I began to look for a winter hack and Mrs Tex said “Hang on! What do you mean your ride to work bike is too nice to ride to work?!”
  18. 5 points
    . . . slipping your gloved hand into a warm muff
  19. 5 points
    I have been trying to make it easy to connect my lithium jump-start battery to the bike. My rented garage has no electricity and the bike battery has gone dead on me once after me being away for two weeks. I have a great deal of respect for batteries, I know how to connect and disconnect them and I know what is supposed to happen if the negative and positive bits connect with each other. In fact, what I have to tell you is that I know what actually does happen when the +ve and -ve things connect! For some time I have had an SAE cable attached to the battery, doing nothing most of the time. Today, I thought ‘mmm’, why don’t I try to connect the jump-start battery to that, just to see if that would work okay. Trouble was, I was so occupied with making the connection that I forgot to look at what was happening at the other end of my wires, and 'oh dear', quite a lot was happening. The next thing I knew the ‘frunk’ was alight, choking smoke was billowing out of the thing. I could not see what was going on – but I guessed what was happening. Shone torch into frunk – couldn’t see a thing for the chocking smoke. In a moment, the whole bike would be in flames, the garage would go up and the 1962 Ford something-or-other next door would finally meet its nemesis! I had to do something and soon! Forgetting about my bike gloves, I wrapped my hand in a rag and blindly stuck it into the flames, grabbed the wires (any wires), dragged them out and threw them, burning, on the concrete floor. I then poured water onto my burns and turned to deal with the flames which were still coming from the battery end of the frunk. The battery compartment ‘door’ was on fire. I unscrewed this (warm work) and threw this on the floor; it was well alight. Still there was smoke and some flames coming from the fuse box. I disconnected the battery which was now covered in melted plastic. I Doused the burning fuse box cover with a wet rag, it was holed and unrecognisable. I thought that that was it; surely a dead bike. ... case of a very embarrassing visit to the Honda shop. I left it for half an hour, just to see if anything else was on fire. Then, I prised off the remains of the fuse box cover. The lower two big square fuses (I assume that's what they are) looked a little off colour but other than that, the fuses etc. looked good. Against my better judgement, which we now know is rubbish, I connected the battery and very gingerly turned on the ignition, expecting nothing to happen. Display came on, no error messages. Turned it off and did some deep breathing before repeating the exercise and starting the engine. Burst into life like nothing had happened. Took it for a test run while staring at my knees for evidence of a fire – all was okay. I have ordered a fuse box cover and battery door cover. I was in two minds about the battery, which appeared to be structurally intact; however, I decided to replace it. On the side of the frunk, is a ‘surgical’ cut out, only ¼ inch deep which was caused by the hot wires touching it as I dragged them out of the frunk. Those wires cut through that plastic like a knife through butter! Despite my courageous, stupid but successful reach into the flames of the frunk, I only have a small burn on one of my fingers. Clearly, it could have been much, much worse. The rag which had protected my hand was smoking, chared and holed in several places. So, an eventful day, full of excitement and learning! I'm running everything on AAs from now on!
  20. 5 points
    My Ural was variable compression. Started off low compression, leaked oil into the bore which raised it, got warm and expanded to low, oil pressure dropped so overheated to very high, push rods got tight, low.....👎 Andy
  21. 5 points
    A few early production VFR 1200 engines were found to have manufacturing swarf in them. As a result Honda replaced the engines of the entire first production run, many of them unsold machines on the showroom floor. They discovered a problem and dealt with it. More recently Triumph replaced the cylinder heads on a number of very early 1200 Explorers which had slightly noisy valve gear due to a machining intolerance. Affected owners were each given a brand new 1200 to use while their bike was being repaired. It’s not the problem, it’s how you deal with the problem.
  22. 5 points
    There have been many threads like this over time. Its easy to sit at a computer and rant when its not your bike. Every day I deal with contracts and liability clauses. As the bike ran for, what, 6 months and 1800 miles, it wasn't spotted straightaway so the bike can't be rejected at point of sale. Honda are only obliged to take reasonable (in the eyes of the law not ours) measures to rectify and that's a repair to fix the fault (ie no gasket). If the dealer is on your side you might get extra leverage, especially if there is consequential damage - but you'll have to prove it. Proving that, or proving negligence, is virtually impossible under contract law and would certainly cost more than the bike is worth. You'd be more successful in appealing for goodwill measures - extended warranty, discounted service etc - and that will likely be of higher value to you anyway. As for demanding a new engine (just in case) or a new bike (because I'm worth it) then you're dreaming. Or you do what everyone else does. Keep it for a year then trade it in.
  23. 5 points
    I stuff my gloves on a cold day on my engine when I stop for a break. I too think to-day's kit offers so much more warmth and some even manage to keep water out. My kit in the early 60s kept water out as it was PVC.... but no lining at all. As I was commuting every weekend to 'court' my future wife from near Swindon to Dundee, over winter, (it got too expensive so I had to marry her) My insulation was mainly newspapers stuffed down my jacket and trousers, with as many shirts, vests, trousers etc as would fit under. I had thick gloves with over-mitts and even a home made fluorescent waterproof plastic over-mitt for my over-mitts. Naturally a white silk scarf and Mk2 (I think) flying goggles was all I could wear with my open faced helmet which meant defrosting my face on arrival.... Ah those were the days.... which I am glad are past!
  24. 5 points
    Don’t think we are going to get any level agreement on this as there are those that think Honda have committed a cardinal sin and should give the customer a new bike and those that think a mistake has been made and a reasonable level of rectification has been offered. Both are entitled to their opinion and if we were to discuss it for months nobody is going to change their view. Now if you want something I consider a cardinal sin commited by Honda it's the fact that they named a scooter a Silverwing when a silver wing was actually a 650 V-Twin
  25. 5 points
    So Mr Paul goes to his Honda dealer as a faithful customer. He puts his 'hard earned' saved up cash on the table to purchase his pride and joy. He believes faithfully that the product has been tried, tested which it surely has (they sell a lot of these) and his particular bike has sailed through quality control at Honda. He then finds out 1800 miles later that there is a serious defect in the main component of his pride and joy in the shape of a missing head gasket. Assuming the bike was 'run in' with a missing head gasket ? Come on people, this is a new engine at the very least, with extended warranty and a free 'full service' at the next interval or the option to have his 'hard earned' money back should he choose to.....And throw in a written apology from Mr Honda. -Mark-
  26. 5 points
    At the risk of offending several posters, I think this argument is getting a little extreme. The only possible damage I could see might be a little water getting into the oil. That is highly unlikely to cause engine damage. I'm sure most of us are familiar with white gunge from condensation in rocker box covers which doesn't damage engines. If there had been a serious water leak there would have been plenty of evidence in a smoke screen as those of us who have had a cylinder gasket fail know full well! An apology with an extra years guarantee would satisfy me.
  27. 5 points
    I take no Zebras were harmed during the making of those muffs? Andy.
  28. 5 points
    Why not? My argument would be "How do I know that nothing else has been bodged?" Same argument for the bike. And what if they don't? Tyres are a consumable item, engines aren't. Why should the little man on the street be shafted by a big multinational firm like Honda? They should just roll over and supply a new bike, they've nothing to lose except a few quid but will gain good PR. Not holding their hands up and saying "Hey, one slipped through the net, have a replacement" will only bring them bad PR. If it were me in that position I'm afraid that the bike would feel forever tarnished.
  29. 5 points
    http://hondanews.com/releases/415eb523-2503-4e35-861c-a7d6fb1a7f2c Loving the new tricolour
  30. 5 points
    Valves need to be cold otherwise false readings - I like to do the biggie service over a couple of days but I do a lot more then the dealer
  31. 5 points
    Enjoy, and in the best colour too
  32. 5 points
    Hi Alan, Congratulations Ballistic black definitely looks better in flesh than online. Personally I call it 'stealth' black as its matte finish reminds me of all these F-117 or B-2 planes. P.S. Ted, looks like we need Africa Twin sub forum here
  33. 5 points
    It does look rather nice, but I would be wary of even letting it see a packet of salted crisps. Andy.
  34. 5 points
    Italian exotica Designed by Leonardo's descendants Styled by the people who brought you Gucci Wired by men who dream of spaghetti Parts supply organised from a country where the government changes faster than the traffic lights and gets about as much attention. Andy (Ex Guzzi owner)
  35. 5 points
    I'm definitely a sucker for the heritage and history of the Honda Deauvilles.((1998-2013) spanning three generations — and named after the French seaside resort) The Deauville has definitely hammered my biking ego. I think I will go to a dark room and dream of Jawa 2 strokes.
  36. 5 points
    No way will they drop the ‘heritage’ bullshit! It sells them thousands of bikes a year. Tens of thousands, probably. Who was going to buy (or even look at) a ‘Bloor 900’? But a Triumph Trident 900? “Stand aside! I’m first..” Just make sure you (and our friend Andy M) don’t get a job in Triumph marketing department..
  37. 5 points
    The trouble with going 'private' is you have to do all the work yourself. You have to sell your existing bike (and have a bunch of pikeys calling at your home telling you what a piece of crap it is and how they'll do you a favour and take it off your hands at half the asking price..). Then you have to sort out the finance on your new bike. Then you have to find the 'right' bike.. Using a dealer saves you all of that hassle. You ride in on your old bike, sign a couple of forms and ride out again. Of course, the dealer would like a 'little something' for his trouble.. But that's not 'fair' eh, Michael? My Integra sits on the dealer's forecourt where it's been since April 1st when I rode away on Percy. I'm glad I'm not trying to sell that sodding thing privately! Tell me again how much money they made on the sale of my Triumph? **** all until the Integra goes!!
  38. 5 points
  39. 4 points
    The Voices in your head will naturally scream blue murder that the repaired engine is about to explode, setting the atmosphere on fire and ending all human life in the process (this will also invalidate your insurance and cause the Cup Final to be indefinately postponed and it'll be your fault). Mine do anyway. Watch the fuel economy/range, oil level and how well it pulls up hills. The numbers lie less often than the voices in your head. If its not performing, going back to Honda with notes on fuel use is a better argument. Andy
  40. 4 points
    I had some muffs fitted many years ago and worked well until the local kids stuffed them with snow, the little rascals..
  41. 4 points
    So a few thoughts after my first 130 miles on my new AT. Nothing controversial or surprising to say. Simply.... love it. Smooth Beautiful balance Well bolted together. Pulls like a train, wow what an engine. Even the OEM tyres have been ok in the wet this week but then the bike feels just so planted. I have the manual version, the clutch is light and the gears as smooth as a very smooth thing on a smooth day. I haven't adjusted the suspension yet, feels good straight out of the box so far. Screen gives really good wind protection. That's it really. All in all, apart from missing the frunk, a very very happy bunny.
  42. 4 points
    Just had genuine Honda grips fitted to my Integra. (The dealer forgot to fit them when I bought the travel kit ...). I can honestly say you can't physically hold the grips when they're on setting 5 with bare hands! (Not that you would ride without gloves, of course!) It also helps I've got massive Barkbusters covering the whole grip area so no wind or rain on the hands. They heat up within a minute or so. And, although it's not mentioned anywhere in the owners manual, the LCD on the bike has a symbol for when they're on and a number for the setting too. Well Integrated there Honda!
  43. 4 points
    Not bothered in the slightest. I’m one of those stubborn old sods who make buying decisions based solely on past experience (and, if I’m honest, good old fashioned bias). And I have lots of experience (and a more than fair helping of bias! ). I’ve had four Hinckley Triumphs and they’ve been exemplary. Without, so far, a single warranty claim between them. I have also had eight or nine BMWs. They were also trouble free during my time with them. Do I care what ‘the internet’ says? Am I bothered about tales of woe? No. Not really. You can learn lots by listening (reading) to the ‘right’ people. Murray, for example, has both the theoretical knowledge and practical experience to back it up. The trick is to recognise those ‘good’ folks. Anyone remember the guy on here ranting about how the NC750 wasn’t ‘fit for purpose’ and should be avoided at all costs? We laughed, because we knew better, but elsewhere, I promise you, people will have listened and the reputation of the NC will have taken a knock. When I first joined the motor trade a wily old hand told me “Believe nothing you’re told and only half what you see”. The same is (especially) true of the internet.
  44. 4 points
    Panic (big panic!!) over. It was a fuse!! Looked fine but i replaced it and all back working!!
  45. 4 points
    I did some accident repairs on a Yamaha FZ6 last year and can promise you, hand on heart, the build quality is nothing special. It was quite the opposite really, with tin brackets tacked on here and there that were rusting merrily. I could go on (and on) but will leave it there. Sam, you chose well with Harriet. I can’t think of anything that will do the job you ask of her even ‘as well’.And certainly not ‘better’. If you do fancy something more ‘fun’ (and we all know how that feels) I urge you to look long and hard at a Street Triple. Excellent build quality and as much fun as you can have while keeping your pants on. They even do a ‘low’ version (straight out of the factory - not messed about with by a dealer) if you need it. My recommendation would be the 765cc ‘S’ (base model). The R and RS are just ‘bling’. Or score a brilliant deal on the outgoing 675cc bike - nothing wrong with those.
  46. 4 points
    Deauville 650 fitted with large pannier lids. Not pretty but effective
  47. 4 points
    Do you remember those strange masks for the bottom half of your face? They were intended for use with goggles, and covered your nose, cheeks, mouth and chin for protection from the stinging rain and hail. They were held in place by some elastic that went round the back of your head. One dark night I got home from work wearing one. My brother's bedroom was downstairs and I could see his light on, so - still wearing my helmet, Mk2 goggles and mask - I tapped on his window to say 'hi'. His reaction was unforgettable - he saw this terrible apparition, like some kind of space monster looking in at him - and just about lept out of his skin. Ah, the joys of having a little brother to torment!
  48. 4 points
    I'm lucky enough to have a GL1800 (my third one after most of the other generation Wings over the last 30 years) along with my NC750X and love riding them both, obviously for different reasons. The 1800 is a fantastic long distance touring bike but is far more versatile and rides so much better than you would believe if you've never ridden one. I'm lucky enough to have the Nork York Moors, Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and Northumberland/Scottish Borders within easy reach and have explored most of the roads (some of them incredibly narrow, steep, badly surfaced) in these areas over the years on a variety of bikes and the Wing takes them in it's stride as well as most bikes. The NC also will do just about anything you ask of it, OK even with the Sargent seat it's not as all day comfortable as the Wing, but other than that I love it probably because it's such a complete contrast to the Wing. The new Wing looks like a big step forward in lots of areas, much better suspension, a LOT lighter, state of the art electronics etc and of course DCT. The one thing Goldwings have never had is a really nice gearchange and ever since I first test-rode a DCT equipped bike when they first became available I've been waiting for Honda to see the light and fit it to the Wing. I just worry that in the quest for a lighter, sleeker, sportier Goldwing maybe Honda have gone a bit too far. The fairing doesn't look like it will give anything like the weather protection that my current Wing has, according to the first ride reports the seats are not as comfortable and the total luggage capacity has been slashed from 150 litres to 110 litres. It'll be interesting to see it at the NEC, hopefully, in a few weeks time.
  49. 4 points
    The obvious thing is that you cannot have it both ways. You realistically have to accept that the dealer needs to make a profit. You cannot expect top dollar part ex and a high discount on the new bike at the same time. I try to go in at the end of the the month when ever I am making a purchase hoping to luck out on the dealer needing to hit a target. I paid list for the AT but got a ridiculously good part ex (£2000 more than anyone else was offering) I am happy to accept that my bikes are going to cost me money. I balance this against the pleasure I derive from the purchase. Not ganging up but just giving my 2 penneth.
  50. 4 points
    Been out on the new seat today. I rode it for five hours with a just a couple of short breaks for a cuppa and petrol and the seat is fantastic, worth every penny.
×