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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 22/12/19 in all areas

  1. 23 points
    Here we go then.
  2. 22 points
    These are some of the bikes Sue and I have owned over the years. Sadly there are some that we don't have pictures of.
  3. 19 points
    At last the sun has come out and it's consistently bright and dry for the day. A quick nip out on the Cub up and over Dartmoor has lifted the spirits enormously. And now I'm about a third of the way through running it in at about 250 miles 😁 Combestone Tor A backroad somewhere
  4. 18 points
    As promised, the long-awaited "Honda CB300R First Impressions Review" Having ridden about 100 miles so far, I thought I’d give you a first impressions review. As you walk up to the bike, it’s obvious that it shares it’s DNA with the other three bikes (four if you include the non UK,CB250R) in Honda’s “Neo Sports Café “ line up. It’s all rather angular from it’s characteristic two part LED headlight to it’s chiselled pillion seat. The combined cat (and everything else) in the rear exhaust section means this is a huge component. Honda have done their best to make it a pleasant looking thing though .Let’s not talk about the tail end for now which some have described as a “selfie stick” J The previous (MY18) model’s Red and Gloss Black have been joined this year by a rather nice bright silver (gunmetal rad shrouds) and I’m told a very nice matt blue. The latter being set off rather nicely by having bronze wheels. It looks a tall bike from certain angles, certainly compared to the Grom. Slinging a leg over it the first thing you notice is the view forward – like many modern bikes you can’t see the front mudguard at all by virtue of the sharp steering angle, the world disappears beyond the top edge of the dash. Seating position is upright with a slight reach to the bars for me, legs are slightly behind giving it the sportier side of upright. Talking of sharp, the corners of the angled seat dig into your thighs a bit – but are unnoticed once underway. The digital dash is of the white -on- black LCD variety (which I preferred on the previous NC over it’s multi-colour TFT replacement). It shows most of the info you need e.g. MPH, Bar graph Tacho, time, mpg, engine temp etc. Nice to see a fuel gauge but it lacks a gear position indicator which I feel is a bit penny-pinching given the bike’s intended market as an A2 compliant step-up bike. The handlebar controls are in the usual and correct place, except for the big grey horn button (which we have become used to by now). Clutch action is light and the bike starts easily and emits a pleasant thrum. Clutch bite is very early, in fact I checked the free play with the book and it is correct at 10-20mm. First gear is short as you’d imagine and second gear starts would be easily accomplished if it were easier to access 2nd from neutral (it’s not). That said, the gearbox is a joy with all changes slick and positive up and down the box (compared to the Tracer 700 which had a very notchy downward shift). Neutral too, is easy to find unlike my previous NC750S which was really difficult with a hot engine due to clutch drag which I never successfully adjusted out. Throttle response is excellent – fuelling almost perfect. Acceleration is brisk for such a small engine, but it mine feels a little tight still – probably due to the low miles. Nevertheless, thanks to the lovely gearbox you’re soon in top and looking for 7th… In 6th Gear rpm’s equal mph/10 so it’s easy to see that you are indeed in top. Fourth gear is the best gear in town allowing brisk pace and easy speed management with the surprisingly torquey little single not being fully linear – instead possessing a very nice little power band at 6500rpm which makes it feel a bit naughty to ride. Brakes? Excellent – obviously helped by the low weight of the new frame in the CBR with good feel and brilliantly progressive too. The front will literally stop you on a dime, rear is both useful and affective but engine braking as you might imagine, rewards good planning and the brakes are superfluous most of the time when riding “normally” only being necessary when pushing on through the twisties. Speaking of twisties, again due to it’s light weight, like the brakes counter steering is largely redundant too as the little 300 can be thrown into bends with a mere shifting of weight or position in the saddle. The suspension has a little bit of initial sag front and rear with weight distribution roughly 50/50. The OEM Dunlop Sportmax tyres are hard – especially in these low temperatures and slow to warm up too. I had no confidence issues in the dry and soon had the chicken strips reduced in width, but lack of feedback might cause a bit of worry in the wet – all pretty standard by my experience of Dunlop rubber though. The two channel ABS is supposed to be IMU based with dynamic linking between front and rear - but I couldn’t invoke the anti-dive effect even though I had the front wheel gently skipping. Perhaps the MY18 version I have lacks this, I’ll have to check. A gentle bimble today from Derby to Alfreton on the back roads was most enjoyable. Average fuel consumption being 90.2 mpg. This came down to 82 mpg during my quick return blast down the A38. For the record - on the “private” stretch of this particular road, maximum speed topped out at almost exactly 90mph at 9000 rpm with 1500 rpm left before the red line. The white (bright) change-up LED was set to 6k rpm when I first got the bike and was winking at me quite a lot so I shifted it to 9k now it’s time to stretch out the little motor a little. Talking of engine speed, it has taken me a little while to get used to the revvy nature of this little single. Having had bigger bikes of late, with almost ornamental gears getting a small bike with which you have to actually use the gearbox is a revelation! I’m already getting back that feeling which got me into bikes over forty years ago. The little 300 is a joy to ride. It’s great to have a bike which rewards good technique, a bike you can literally throw a leg over and throw into bends. It’s been a long time since the simple motion of a gear change can have the bike twitching in harmony like it’s a part of you rather than feeling like you’re an accessory to it. As I approached Derby city limits (not really Nutbush) The motor has rewarded a little bit of appropriate thrash by loosening up quite a bit. That lovely forth gear zoom is even more zoomy and as my confidence improves again it’s great to filter – just because I can and not because “you have to”. The Honda CB300R really is my little "Grown up Grom" Lazza
  5. 16 points
    This morning I took my annual "fleet" photograph. They are - 2006 Honda CBF250 - looking a bit battered because it's in daily use through the winter and is my general runabout. 1992 Yamaha FJ1200 & 2006 Suzuki SV650. They are in hibernation at present. I'll ride both this spring/summer/autumn. I favour the FJ for longer runs or when carrying a pillion and the SV for the twisty stuff.
  6. 15 points
    Well, Thanks to all you wonderful people my bike is alive again. Today I replaced the clutch and it did the job. I am chuffed to bits that i finally got there. I had so much help from all of you. I must admit I do feel a bit stupid for changing things that turns out didn't need to be changed. Like I've said before I have learnt some new diagnostic skills and purchased some new tools that will aid me in the future. Thanks again to each one of you.
  7. 12 points
    Morning Geoff, I have the wonderful good fortune of being able to try the scooter world without having to sell the Bonnie (yet). Sir Trev gave me an excellent deal on a 1998 250 Burgman (a model that’s - apparently - known as a “quarter pounder” ) that belonged to a relative who could no longer ride for health reasons. It needs a clean and a spot of recommissioning but should provide me with the relevant information to make a decision on my two wheel future. And I do still have a future, I have no doubt of that. If I enjoy it (or the concept, big advances have been made in the 22 years it’s been around) sufficiently, then it’s perfectly possible I will chop the Triumph for a new one at some future point. We shall see, eh? Meanwhile, on Wednesday I’m off to ride the hairpins and mountains of Gran Canaria then back home for cataract removal operations. It’s a busy few weeks ahead..
  8. 11 points
    Some of you may have noticed I posted a shout some weeks back, having hit a pheasant at around 50mph on a dark and winding country lane. The dumb bird was, for whatever reason, stood in a puddle right in the line of fire, presumably eyeing up some skirt in the opposite hedge (or whatever it is that brings pheasants to be stood in the middle of the bloody road). Couldn't make out the thing as I approached because it was dark. It was only when there was movement ahead that I realised I was bearing down on something that shouldn't be there, and a second later the lights picked it up. Always amazed that in these situations my ageing brain takes the correct course of action (for example on the Norge on the same road three years previously, I'd encountered another dumb bird who simply had not stopped, not even for a moment's hesitation, when leaving one of the side turnings, my instinct being not to brake or swerve but to open the throttle wide and hoof it). I braced for impact and mentally prepared myself for collecting some wildfowl with my feet. But the thing launched into the air and reached headlamp altitude for the precise moment of impact, meaning there was a loud crack, a flurry of unidentifiable bits and pieces and a raised left arm to deflect them. With the lights still working and the bike feeling no different, I kept going, pausing only a couple miles down the road to check damage ("well isn't that just great") and wipe away the remnants. Sorry vegans. Anyway. Bike came back from the dealer last week with a £1,000 bill and lots of workshop staff cooing over it, having previously never encountered one with petrol on actual tarmac. Having gotten it back home I set off again (lovely day) and was reminded at how hard it would be to find another machine as completely satisfying in every single regard. Two or three of the YouTubers that I watch picked the GL1800 as their bike of the year despite it being way out of category for them and an archetypal old man's machine. The weight - something a lot of potential owners are fearful of - is honestly no more noticeable than the NC. Power delivery is smooth and fluent and this feeling is boosted by the transmission. One of the American reviewers noted that in Sport, the GL was the fastest accelerating bike to 60mph that they'd tested all year. Yet in Eco or Tour it has just enough power, rather than woah way too much, and feels docile in every regard. Corners just melt into the flow. The brakes are phenomenal. The ride quality has no two wheeled equal. Small things, from reverse gear to the front indicator lamps glowing dimly - giving the bike obvious presence on the road both day and night - all help with the feeling that every journey will be an easy one. There are some niggles. I don't like the DCT at low speed, a complaint I never levelled at the NC, and something I notice the company has addressed in some regard for the 2020 MY. The cubby in the faring for your smartphone doesn't lock, which is stupid. Mine is the Airbag model, and the home of the exploding cushion deletes a very useful frunk. I also really miss a digital speedo, and because the old school gauges are twelve inches apart, glancing at them is neither intuitive nor quick. Let's be honest: dials with numbers and needles look nice in brochures and in Honda showrooms, but are crap on the road. Given the enormous LCD display panel between the speedo on the left and the tacho on the right, you'd think there'd be a way of showing your speed in a large typeface and to five decimal places. But there isn't a way of showing your speed at all. Also, when the mirrors are folded, the brake lever catches on the right glass - a silly design oversight. And however much I pretend otherwise, it isn't a featherweight. You have to be, how can I put this, assertive with steering input. I know we've all said at some point, "This one's a keeper!" only to be lured into another bike in an entirely different segment because it's not in your garage and therefore unknown and different and highly seductive because of that. But I'm really not sure how that could happen here.
  9. 10 points
    CB300R. You mentioned I should check it out Tex Been doing research for the last month. Collecting this Thursday. Reg Dec 2018 but only has 500 miles on it.
  10. 9 points
    I am in possession of and custodian for at least three months (possibly more) of a very good friends motorcycle as he is away in a far off land for work. My task is to service the beast and use as required. Could be very interesting as said motorcycle is the much derided Yamaha Niken! I'm hoping the the arrangement will last so I can take it over for the TT. Looking forward to plenty of verbal abuse, pointing, being laughed at ect while out and about. (Pics to follow once I've paid my subs)
  11. 9 points
    I was chatting to some old pals the other night and the topic got round to how age has dulled our skill. I said “Oh, I don’t know, I’m going faster into corners than I ever have” ”What? Seriously?” ”Yes, my eyes are so bad I can’t see the f***ers coming!”
  12. 9 points
    Saw this at the 1066 today. Not a common sght these days. Despite being a single it could arguably considered to be a forefather of the Africa Twin
  13. 9 points
    Strangely if I wanted the extra power I'd have done it already. I'm more than happy with my 'little' fleet, CRF250 Rally, Honda C125 Super Cub and 1986 Honda C90. If I'd really wanted more, I would've just gone out and bought a Panagale V4 and a lifetime subscription to my local physiotherapist and had done with. Nothing like flying through the pearly gates backwards with yer a**e on fire for an experience............😈😈😈
  14. 9 points
    Having already got the Monkey I thought this matching pair might be nice I remember years ago a rather wealthy friend liked his lid so much he had his Gixer painted to match.
  15. 9 points
  16. 9 points
    Tail tidy, what tail tidy?
  17. 9 points
    Wait until I've bought some shares in dry cleaning companies and Nikwax if you would please. Lovely bike. Needs lots of petrol before anything else. Anything that doesn't annoy you three tanks in a row is fine. Andy
  18. 8 points
  19. 8 points
    Ok You asked Yes I gave up voluntarily after a bit of a fright though. In latter years I didn't drink as much as I used to. I wasn't a regular drinker but boy could I binge. As I got older a few over the top were getting more and more painful the following day. I once said that if I ever got an excuse to give it up I would do so. I got the excuse and I kept my word. That excuse took the form of the ticker revving to its max in an hotel room at 5 in the morning after 4 days trail riding and associated revelry, dehydration, exercise in excess of my limits etc etc. Short trip to ER and it all settled of its own accord. Drink was not to blame alone but I felt it didn't help and as I wished to continue my lifestyle as it was I decided there and then to give it up. That was over two and a half years ago. The positives are no more tachycardia thingys, no more hangovers, feeling fresh and ready for the road at biking events when there are seedy heads all around me, I have gotten much much fitter, no associated weight issues, and a significantly healthier Griff. I am of course under no illusion that we never know whats around the corner. Do I recommend it ? I suppose that depends on the individual. If your drinking involves an occasional pint and a couple of glasses of wine with a meal or the like then stick with that as it is unlikely to change your life much if You stop. However if You are like me and have a tendency to be slightly excessive then I do recommend it. I will probably never drink again because I don't want to go back to where I was. I do miss it occasionally at mealtimes and the like, but I love the positive aspects more. I do sometimes get bored at rallies and other events where my mates get pissed, but I have various methods of coping. A weakness for Chocolate, Walkers crisps and fresh cream with Apple pie are a side affect, but I try to control those as best I can and I suppose my strong exercise regime helps to control the affects. Hope that helps..........
  20. 8 points
    Dear Bazza, we all have different approaches to things, and we all do it different. If someone tried to explain it to you maybe you wouldn't understand anyway. I'm just glad we're all different, it's what makes life interesting.😉 Dont let us small bike riders confuse you sir. We're happy going small because we realise we've nothing to prove to anyone. Sometimes we had to buy a big bike to find that out, I know I did. And one other thing....😎 Light bikes are best, it's just a fact😁 and their riders are awesome...
  21. 8 points
    First 50 mile review coming in five, four, three, two... You'll have to wait till tomorrow - I've had a couple of pints of Jaipur now First day back at work. It was weird after three months of feeling very poorly. Coming home the long way round really helped
  22. 7 points
    I am very fortunate to live at the foot of the North Pennines. Having given up shall we say, main stream motor cycling some months ago I do miss a tootle out on a sunny day onto the roads which are little more than surfaced tracks in a lot of cases which link Teasdale and Weardale. Forget the Super Hero image of barrelling along on the obligatory GS with Paris Dakar levels of commitment a 40/50mph meander will do me just fine. Now this may seems little strange but if no other concerns needed consideration then I would pop out and acquire a CB500f. However the worry that the physical presence of a conventional motorcycle would cause my dear wife would be unacceptable plus arthritis in the hands is becoming a problem. Enter the Cub. Could be the perfect laid back “Tooteller” stress and worry free. Could stand for days or even weeks on end without the thought of thousands of pounds devaluing like snow of a dyke or is this just a bored fantasy of someone filling his time while his wife watches Escape to the Country, YUK. Geoff.
  23. 7 points
    My Fleet. L to R; Winterwing, Summerwing 😂
  24. 7 points
    Used to be a heavy drinker. Stopped. Benefits massive. Sleep improved beyond recognition, weight loss, mood stability, blood pressure reduced. Basic equation is you can have an hour or two of euphoria (the sweet spot of a drinking session) along with a boat load of problems that this brings with it or 24 hours of much better quality life seven days a week. The very unpleasant reaction of many facets of the human condition in the first week or so after giving up should probably be enough to put you off for good. Geoff.
  25. 7 points
    I have this argument with the wife about every other month. Cottage Pie - Beef (& Worcester sauce) Shepherds Pie - Lamp (with curry powder) Fisherman's Pie- Fish Hippie Pie - Quorn (unless fresh Hippie is available) Andy
  26. 7 points
    Pillion report. Me and Kels have just done a 10 mile ride on the little CB. Stopped half way for a coffee . She's fairly happy for that mileage, the only real discomfort being the relatively high peg position gave her a bit of cramp but we put that down to: a) Kelly's not been on a bike since last July 2) It's cold. The draughty conditions have blown us about a bit but it would've done any bike. Great fun round the lanes of Weston on Trent. There's another benefit of a little bike - more fun on little roads without having to travel miles to find fast sweepers. It compresses the perspective of roads almost like zooming a telephoto lens. I'm also happy to report that the "Grown up Grom" handles and performs much the same two up as with just me on it. The gearbox needs perhaps a little more stirring - but not much. Brakes and chassis perfectly happy with the additional weight too. You both tend to ride as a single "unit" with space at a premium of course which helps when you push on a bit. Tyres and rear shock preload left standard too - it's fine.
  27. 7 points
    Thrashing bikes is what they’re made for! If you want to chug around you may as well get an NC. Oh! Hang on..
  28. 7 points
    I want a "Dodge V8" to take me to Extinction Rebellion protests. Geoff. Also looking for the plate, Greta 1 to go on it.
  29. 7 points
    Wasn’t to worried about the grouping
  30. 6 points
    Well, it was Geoff brought up the depreciation (I think he called it ‘devaluing’) in the OP. So maybe it’s more important to him than you? I have had the most wonderful time thrashing a rented CB500X round Gran Canaria this week and the penny dropped that if I stop buying bikes the depreciation I save means I can come here every winter.. Edit: why buy stuff when you can build memories?
  31. 6 points
    I think you mean "Less power to the people".
  32. 6 points
    If asked I would say it's a tribute to Barry but in truth it covers a dent from a crash.
  33. 6 points
    The first rule of the NC Forum sub 400cc splinter group is that you don't mention the NC Forum sub 400cc splinter group... Got it?
  34. 6 points
    Hello all, Just to keep all you fine people in the loop. I have ordered all the relevant clutch parts and oil. I will hopefully be fitting them this weekend. I have never had a clutch go in all my years of biking and I could not tell the symptoms. I really do hope this solves my issue. Yes, I will feel stupid but also relieved. I have performed some checks and tests I have never done before during this diagnosis. I have bought some kit that I will use forever too. I'll hopefully be letting you all know the outcome soon. Thank you all again.
  35. 6 points
    Remember what I've advised a million times on this 'ere forum. Buy it, stash it. A month or two down the line, if it's spotted - say this, "Oh, this old thing... I've had it ages..." They do it with shoes and handbags. Kels! Erm... I can explain Ouch! OUCH! Sorry dear. Ouch!
  36. 6 points
    Andy, you're not very good at changing tyres, mate. You've put the blooming stickers, on both wheels, upside down ...
  37. 6 points
    Battery load failure was indeed the culprit, with both batteries. Thank you all for teaching me a valuable lesson of battery charge versus battery load. I wrongly assumed that a fully charged battery equated to a fully capable (load delivery) battery (especially with the 'newer' MightyMax battery being under a year old). I installed a new battery and she fired right up with no hesitation (vice a 10% chance of starting pre-battery swap). I got my daily commuter back! Thanks again for all your sage advice, and Happy New Year!!
  38. 6 points
    Right, I’m home with a cuppa, Mrs T is clattering about in the kitchen making a pie. And Diesel is sitting at her side, ever hopeful she might drop something tasty. Or anything at all really.. A little background for those unfamiliar with the arcane intricacies of the spring clip. The whole assembly that joins the two ends of the chain is the master link, which comprises of a side plate with two pins riveted through it, a removable side plate and a horseshoe shaped clip which locates in groves machined in the pins. It was a perfectly sound method (indeed, the only method) of joining a chain right up until the late seventies when the horsepower of the emerging breed of ‘Superbikes’ made the possibility of failure a worry. The worry wasn’t entirely unfounded as a couple of high profile failures bore witness. For example, in 1973 (or 74, don’t remember exactly) Kawasaki sought to publicise it’s new Z1 with some record attempts at Daytona. A team of four riders (Yvon Duhamel, Hurley Wilvert, Art Bauman and Cook Nielson from memory) were to ride two only lightly modified Z1s round the outer banked circuit for 24 hours seeking to raise the record - which at that time was still held by a 500 Velocette - to an average of 120mph. More than halfway through the attempt one bike broke a master link and, the rules of record breaking being as they are, had to stay where it was until the mechanics could get to it and fit a replacement. The delay cost that bike any chance of the record but the other one ran faultlessly to the finish. Racers began to rivet their chains to eliminate a possible weak spot and, as we all know, anything a racer does soon finds it’s way onto road bikes but there’s really nothing wrong with a, correctly fitted, spring clip. The 500cc Paton (75 hp, 140+ mph) raced in the Classic TT by John McGuinness has a spring clip that remains with the chain for life, being removed and re-used as often as necessary. To correctly assemble a master link you need to lubricate both pins with a heavy duty grease before sliding them through the ends of the chain. The removable side plate should be a tight(ish) fit over the pins and be pushed fully ‘home’. Then the spring clip is fitted (closed end facing the direction of travel) by sliding it into place. It’s essential not to try and lever the open ends apart. When a master link fails it’s normally because the spring clip has, somehow, gone awol and that allows the removable side plate to work it’s way off the pins and then the chain parts.. There are three ways (finally we get to the point! ) to secure a spring clip. All require that the side plate and the clip be properly clean. One is to put a dab of silicone (ordinary ‘household’ stuff, the sort you might use to seal plumbing) on the side plate before fitting the clip. The silicone is sticky and tends to ‘glue’ the clip in place. Another method is to assemble the clip onto a, scrupulously clean, side plate then put a generous dab of enamel paint over both. Leave to dry overnight and not only does the paint stick the clip and side plate together but it provides an early warning of possible failure by visibly cracking. The last method is the one we use on the racers. Assemble up the master link, fit the clip and then loop a thin wire (household fuse wire is fine) around the centre of the removable side plate and the clip and twist the ends together until it’s tight. Most bikes fitted with standard (ie not O ring) chains will used a spring clip. Most O ring chains are riveted. Each remain totally relevant. Hope that helps, Lloyd?
  39. 5 points
    If it helps. Neither choice is wrong. I would go for the SH, but would still have a pang of mild regret if a new Cub passed me coming the other way. The SH is eminently practical and does the job perfectly, but does it make you smile when you see it........ Actually none of the above was helpful at all was it
  40. 5 points
    Geoff, having actually bought a new Super Cub, I can thoroughly recommend them. They are not the expensive option right now, for instance North West Honda are selling them for £2590 for a pre reg'd one with no miles on, which is what I paid for mine. Many others are selling them for around £2800. Look on Autotrader. And negotiate for a rear rack, it'll give you somewhere to put your sandwiches at least. I got mine chucked in for free. I'm really pleased with mine, it retains the character of the old cub but with up to date bits, better suspension and is plenty quick enough to keep up with traffic, which my old C90 often is not. They need about 1000 to 1500 miles to free up properly, mines already freeing up nicely at 300 miles. It is brilliant for those back lane relaxed bimbles, and it cost less than a full "adventure" luggage set for some bikes I could mention. Hell, its's only about £800 more than some gortex riding suits I could mention also😂 Go on, I don't think you'd regret it
  41. 5 points
    It is, but I've got to put me sandwiches somewhere, and it was sitting around doing nothing in the garage, much like my good self this time of year..........
  42. 5 points
    Electrically heated underwear ... well ahead of its time!
  43. 5 points
    Baby has a soft rev limiter somewhere north of 12000 revs. I believe it will exceed 100mph but I know it is happy - and all the vibes are gone - at 80mph.
  44. 5 points
    Griff, mine only gets going when it gets to its step up in power at 7500 rpm, maybe that's the difference with the 2017 on Rally. Mine has been to Spain and back, to Italy and back and over much of the UK, on motorway, road and track, covering nearly 20,000 miles along the way and is still running absolutely fine, with every indication it will continue to do so. Even when I did the valves, the exhausts were still just in spec, the inlets were right on the standard setting. On a private road it is capable of a sprint up to an indicated 85. (Satnag 77) at an indicated 70, it's on about 1/3 to 1/2 throttle on the flat. Its a machine, Honda will have tested that motor at max chat and full load for many hours. And of course I don't ride everywhere at those speeds, so it spends a lot of time under 6000 rpm as well. Either way, they're great bikes. 😇
  45. 5 points
    Quite a cool little bike. As you say it's rare - more so than my CBF250. I hired one in Corfu about 10 years ago. It carried the pair of us around the island fine.
  46. 5 points
    Farkles: 15T sprocket ordered. And for £10 Labour I ain't getting my hands dirty and cold at this time of year. Yes, 50cc makes quite a difference. It'll easily pull an extra tooth (pardon the pun) and moves the slightly high rpm at 70mph down to be less buzzy. That said at 8k rpm everything smoothes out again. Plus the speedo then reads spot on apparently. Screen. Dunno yet. By about three tanks of juice (600 miles) I'll know. Tail tidy. Nah, it's fine as it is ta. Thanks though Rocker, if I do decide to change my mind later, I'll look up the evotech one. Fitting it is a doddle for me either way. I notice some have a small slot at the rear of the stalk mounting to avoid cutting and re-splicing wires. If not, my method is to push out the appropriate pins from the multi plug and refit after threading through.
  47. 5 points
    I’d have to agree with Andy and I can tell you that goes against the grain for me . Bit like saying I think spurs will will the championship this season :0) . Worst thing I done was follow the trend and got a tail tidy !,,, all I get now is shit on my crash helmet and stones on my tank on the ktm . Never again :0)
  48. 5 points
    It's an expensive way of ensuring the back wheel doesn't spray crap up your back!
  49. 5 points
    Alvaston oh Alvaston, No quote for you're new Honda, Bet you'd get one in the Rhondda, Though you're commute would be much longer. It would only make you stronger. Oh we love Alvaston....... with apologies to Glen Campbell. So, have I got the job?
  50. 5 points
    Most of these to be honest But especially this one.
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