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  1. Tex

    Tex

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  2. slowboy

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  3. Andy m

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 28/09/20 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    I know that I said that I had decided to keep the CB500X but seeing this today has got me sorely tempted to the extent that I have started talking figures which seem satisfactory including the insurance.. It is on a 68 plate with only 2781 miles on the clock and a known service history, Now it's just a matter of summing up the pros and cons. One big plus point is that the seat height makes it easier for me to get on and off plus flat foot both sides. I know I said that I prefer to buy new but the condition low mileage and price of this one makes it seem worthwhile making an exception
  2. 19 points
    To be fair, in my four years on here you have spent the majority of your time arguing about how everyone's post is somehow a personal insult to you, your football team, your union, your previous employment. Even someone planning a long distance trip thread is quickly turned it to discrimination against you because of your personal circumstances. And your behaviour tends to get progressively worse as we head into winter and your riding days diminish with the weather. Sorry, but some days you really do ask for it. As for the comment: "As I said those real supporters who follow a team are entitled to enter into banter others are just trying to be funny but just end up being rude." The last time I checked it was Ted that was the moderator, you cannot tell ANY user what banter they are entitled to enter into. You can of course report the post for Ted to decide who is in the wrong (sorry @ted) Why don't you do the sensible thing, just press the mute button - rather than turn every thread into a Rocker66 feud? It's like you are just waiting for Roders to bait you so you can attack back it actually makes for very pathetic reading, and that isn't what this forum is about. So gents, sort yourselves out, there must be far better uses of your time.
  3. 16 points
    Hello all. This purchase has been bubbling away for a while as I'd all but decided I wanted a modern/retro style bike having decided the 500x was staying. I was initially looking for an Enfield Trials 500 like Mr Toad... I love the look of the trials but having never ridden a 500 single wanted to try one out but my local dealer but had no classic 500 demos.... all sold. We're not exactly tripping over Enfield franchises in Scotland but a quick call to Ecosse Motorcycles in Dundee had me a test ride on their only demo classic 500. I really liked the engine/bike but the vibrations through the bars at 45 to 50mph I couldn't live with... I understand these bikes respond well to sympathetic running in and as a demo this example may not have been but I wasn't prepared for a leap of faith. Like all good salespersons Rory at Ecosse suggested I try out their Interceptor 650 as I had made the journey anyway..... Well I was very impressed... very impressed indeed.. but like any good pessimist decided to "go away and think about it." Numerous weeks passed and then I finally made the decision... I'd rather have a lightly used bike which I knew how it rode and was a known quantity to me... I called Ecosse back to see if their demo bike was available for sale... It was and a deal was done which I was very happy with. The Interceptor is such a smooth bike with enough low down grunt where needed and will happily cruise along at motorway speeds no problem.... although I find it it's best at 50/60...The gearbox is super slick and for me the riding position is a case of sit on and everything fits perfectly.... Downside is tubed tyres but I decided I can live with that. So here it is... I decided after much debate that for me the "Orange Crush" was the most retro but to be honest I don't think there's any bad paint schemes in the range... Just personal preference. I must say at this point a big thank you to Argyll for his help and advice as he knows a bit about these bikes... Cheers Alan👍... Your two interceptors are a credit to you. I'll try and get a good few more miles on it and report back with an update in due course. Alan.
  4. 13 points
    I spent a few days in Europe with theses intrepid Van Van owners about 10 years ago. They would happily ride for 8 or 9 hours a day to get them through the back roads and see things that most of us miss.
  5. 12 points
    By and large I agree with Andy (although every time I went on a technical training course the AA recommended Shell or BP ). I fill up, almost exclusively, at my local Morrisons or Asda. Two reasons, firstly they’re the cheapest and secondly (and equally importantly) they’re pay at the pump and I don’t get the “Will pump number 7 please take his helmet off” bollox. To sum it up in one sentence - I use the cheapest supermarket slop available and it runs like a champ.
  6. 12 points
    You've just seen one I stripped the rear end for a deep clean and found traces of salt encrusted around the shock adjusters (on the inward face where you couldn't see it) which had tarnished the silver finish. Replaced them with a "new" oem set for £67. The bracket for the rear brake reservoir had also been affected so removed it and re-treated it. Otherwise the bike was as clean as a whistle. I think that deserves another pic.
  7. 11 points
    Phwoar, look at the cross hatching on that Nice pair! A nice little package from these fine chaps http://www.d-mengineering.co.uk/en/ 😁😁 Andy
  8. 11 points
    Changed over to super cub. just fancied a change, most of mileage now about town. certainly a lot lighter. will get used to new gear arrangement, different to old c90 I had 50 years ago 50 miles on clock smcg in glasgow
  9. 11 points
  10. 10 points
    Not up to the standard of the Europian tour but September 2018 Northen most point on UK main land and my 62nd birthday :-)
  11. 9 points
    Sound advice from everyone who has responded so far. Yes, classic bikes are small - but that’s part of their attraction. Modern 125s are small too and lots of folks enjoy those. Looking closely at the 5TA (the A denotes unit construction BTW, so a 5T, and it’s sportier brother the T100, would be pre-unit and the 5TA and T100A would be unit - the engine and gearbox are built in ‘one lump’ not separate) it has obviously had a very recent paint job (and in the correct colour) but the mechanical parts much less so. Faded chrome, pitted aluminium etc etc. I think it’s a bit expensive, really. Although I don’t keep abreast of prices, so don’t take that as gospel. If you’re really determined to buy an old Brit I have a large selection of books you’re welcome to borrow so you can learn the subject, but the chances of finding something to exact ‘catalogue spec’ are very remote. My best advice? Sack off the 1962 dreamland and buy a Royal Enfield Interceptor. Or, for twice the price of the Ennie, a CB1100EX. Both are air cooled, look like they were made in the 1960s and will perform beautifully for as long as there’s petrol to put in their tanks. The current Triumph twins are exactly the same but have the added complication/attraction (* delete as appropriate ) of liquid cooling. For clarity, I began riding (legally) in January 1968 and owned lots of the old classics when they were new including a Bonneville, a Commando, a BSA Royal Star, a Guzzi LeMans etc etc. And I would jump clean over any of them to get to my current Triumph.
  12. 9 points
    looks like you'd better part-ex your 500's for another NC boys
  13. 9 points
    ...... or something like that This arrived in the week from Sportstbike Shop My trusty Bultaco open face is showing some wear on the padding, not bad for £50 (half price) from the NEC Bike show four years ago and, although it's still got plenty of life left in it, I wanted something that could be used at slightly more than pottering speeds. My wife bought a Shoei JO last year and is well pleased with it but I'm not really a fan of the cafe racer/hipster look, you can't fit a peak to them and they're expensive IMO - nicely made though. Scouring tinternet for an open face hat with a drop down visor (a proper toughened, anti scratch job not a sun visor) came up with the Shark X Drak as the only other option and, having owned several Shark helmets and been pleased with them, I took a punt. I would have preferred a white one but they were £215 so I went for this rather snazzy design for £185. Still a lot IMO but it's light, well made, cracking visor, has a removable peak (for when I do go all hipster and want to try the goggle look!) and even comes with a neoprene, clip in face mask thing that will be handy to help fend off the rain if I do decide to wear this helmet on longer trips....... or use in the next political protest we have down here in the New Forest A rainy day out on the AT today will give the new hat a good 'buffet test' and it be interesting to see how it copes at 'progressive' speeds, could be my 'go to' helmet
  14. 9 points
    True Although my dealer tells me the ‘post lockdown‘ boom that some predicted has very much happened and Honda UK has sold out of 125cc bikes and all scooters. This is good news, I think, as some of those new buyers will inevitably find their way onto bigger bikes in the future. Maybe the motorcycle as sensible transport is about to make a comeback? We can only hope, eh?
  15. 8 points
    At risk of offending my mate Tex, I'm going to contribute my usual view: I can't see the attraction in British bikes from the '60s and '70s, because by then the industry was in terminal decline and their products reflect that. If you buy and Honda from the 1960s, you get a bike with 1960s technology. If you buy a Triumph/Norton/BSA/RE/AJS/etc from the 1960s, you get a bike with 1930s or 1940s technology. What's worse is that most of them were over-stressed 1930s technology as they competed by putting bigger barrels on fragile bottom ends. Add to that the obvious cost-cutting that took place in the '70s as Norton and Triumph entered their death throes. Having ridden most of the twins from the little list in the previous paragraph, I can say something that may surprise you: they actually aren't that interesting. None of them stand out in any way - they tend to be much of a muchness. None are quick by modern standards; they all handle reasonably well; they all make the same, 360-degree-crank drone; they all use much the same controls, switch gear and electrics. None of them exude quality or good engineering design, and they are all prone to significant mechanical problems. HOWEVER.... How about getting something much more interesting, from when the British motorcycle industry was in its heyday and selling a range of interesting, quirky and sometimes excellent products. Most of all, bikes with character. Here's a list off the top of my head of British bikes that I'd love to own..... I had a look at a Vincent Comet recently and I was very impressed by the superb engineering and build quality, and Vincent's willingness to go their own way rather than following the herd. Mind you, they are seriously expensive, so probably out of reach. The Sunbeam S7 (or S8) has always fascinated me: a longitudinal twin with shaft drive. It is very eccentric. The Douglas Dragonfly is delightful in every way - like a baby BMW boxer and very different from the run-of-the-mill parallel twins. The Panther 120 is the classic British thumper and oozes character from every pore. All of these require care and fettling and have shortcomings galore by modern standards. But they are much more interesting and characterful than the singles and twins Britain churned out in the '60s and '70s. I'm sure others will laugh at my list and put forward their own, but that's fine!
  16. 8 points
    I'm following a guy called Andre Souza on Facebook who is touring Europe. At the latest update after95 days he had been doing so for 95 days and covered 11.000 plus Km . This is the bike that he is doing it on.
  17. 8 points
    This is well over half way along with the muddy stuff behind us, view is out toward Shaftesbury and Tisbury, about 250m up and quite windy, hence the model glider club chucking bits of balsa wood and plastic off the hill just to the left of us, that's their 'windsock' on the fence.
  18. 8 points
    Alternatively, https://indianautosblog.com/jawa-300-exports-europe-begin-this-year-homologation-complete-p320357
  19. 8 points
    My lads pride and joy. Bought for a snip a few years ago. It was running but a bit of a mess. He stripped it and rebuilt it about 6 years ago. Done a cracking job.
  20. 7 points
    Well you have not disappointed in your advice and wisdom on the subject of old British bikes. In no particular order and sorry for not referencing the owners comments in my reply. I am not a big fella 5'6" 150 lbs in pre decimal and I have been on one albeit stationary as my ex next door neighbour raced them. He had a thing of beauty that he stripped and made into a racing bike (not sure of the class) and when he put it all back together he'd not sell it to me as he knew what the engine had been through. Good feedback on that dealer, the lack of information as others provide in the ad was a bit of a red flag and the comments seem to gel with this. I have tools and not afraid to use them, but milling machines and lathes I do not have and would not have the patience or skill to start so that was an eye opener. Magazines - yes that's a good start to give me a further education, I have books (thanks for the offer of a loan) so am trying to educate myself when I'm not riding my other bikes or doing my IAM. Interesting the comments around investment/values. I have seen the values go up about 15-20 % in the three or four years I have been looking and can see the cap being reached or reached as there is a limit to what is sensible to pay. It was not really an investment other than to put meaningless numbers on a bank statement into metal and fettle in the garage, but the advice is accurate and welcome. I've done a few museums in my time group riding again good advice. I am doing my IAM and there is a fella who is training to be an observer who is using me as the subject so its learner learner observer atm - he has old British bikes so may well tap him up for more info/experience. As to riding it it would be a sunny Sunday ride and I guess that in itself could cause issues with infrequent use however being retired it can be any sunny day of the week. Good advice about buying from an enthusiast - albeit a realistic enthusiast in terms of price to sell and I guess that could be an issue someone selling something they have owned for a long time or put many hours into. Then the issue of competency of said enthusiast, asking to see his/her tools (less likely her but to be PC !!) might not go down too well ! Buyer beware, enthusiastic purchaser beware, and I always remember the adage "A fool and his money is easily parted ! " Thanks for the great and comprehensive advice. I'll keep looking and learning and do some dithering - something sadly I'm very good at !
  21. 7 points
    The bike for sale is from Eddie's. This is the bloke Triumph stripped of the West Yorkshire franchise in about 2010. The classic business has been going since then, top money but 100% a business venture and not known for aftersales support. The troubles with Brit bikes IMHO fall into different areas: 1. They ceased to be transport 30 or 40 years ago. Anything running will have been restored at least once. The competence of restorers varies from experts in their field who'll get other experts to do the bits they can't through to the lumberjack shirt and beard oil cretins with their angle grinders. There is also fashion. If that bike was a faked Goldstar in the 90's and was rewired by a polishing expert you don't want it. Eddy will tell you what you want to hear so for this one you need receipts and a really good look under the seat, hear it running etc. Buying from the last user is better if you want a runner, go see if their bench has 86 kinds of drill-mop and a pile of scotch-locks. 2.The market is in decline. If you were 20 in 1963 you are now pushing 80. There is a change from buyers with nostalgia for their own past to buyers wanting antiques. The good condition, original bikes will retain value, the boxes of scrap will not. You also get the sellers where Grandad told them the single carb Bonneville in the shed was owned by Lawrence of Arabia and is worth £50k. As investments forget it, prices are falling. 80 and 90 year olds are buying nursing care. The volume growth is always in the age group of people who denied themselves back then and are now retiring, so late 70's- mid 80's. If you are a tough negotiator prepared to give widows and orphans the hard facts there will be bargains to be had, or you can leave that to Eddy. 3.The NOS spares are gone. You are reliant on small companies making things and scrap from the ones the cafe racer angle grinder crowd destroyed. As the market declines you want the model that is popular amongst the classic bike crowd even down to year. Before buying make a list of parts you might replace over the period you'll own the bike and make sure at least two places sell them. If you need to know a '64 Matchless used the same carb rebuild kit as a' 63 BSA this is not beginner territory, buy the BSA. My silencer is worth more than the rest of the bike. 4.The technology is old. 6V electrics, cable operated drums, 1500 mile oil changes. They are for sunny Sundays and do involve as much garage as riding time. Unless your chauffeur can turn his hand to a quick carb tune you are going to have to learn this stuff and get your hands dirty. Its not difficult but it is easier if you start with all the parts as shown in the manual, not something someone modified 35 years ago. You need patience to see it as a constant work in progress. My CL has been it bits since August with a plan to be running by May, most of which is waiting for the postie and finding time to go whittle a whatsit or clean the thrungng sprocket. Enjoy Andy
  22. 7 points
    Well my Italian bargain Integra alloy swingarm has arrived and i’m very pleased with it. I am now in the process of procuring a new rear shock (current one is nearly 50k miles old and in poor condition; I’m aiming for a YSS one); plus will be fitting a new rear tyre at same time as the swimgarm - I figure might as well do all of this in one weekend. Will depend now on when the shock gets delivered.
  23. 7 points
    Well that was a pain in the arse. I fitted a new front to my CBF250 this afternoon. It pained me that there was still some visible tread but...winter is coming and it needs an MOT…. Home-made bead breaker. The rim was a shocker. Years of winter use (or washing up liquid for fitting?) have resulted in corrosion. Nothing the angle grinder & brush didn’t fix. That when thing went bad. The tyre would just not seat. I lubed the tyre & rim with silicone spray but I don’t think that was the problem. Most tyres are fine but the odd one puts up a fight. I changed to a different lube (shower gel) and a bit of rope round the wheel on the opposite side from the bit that wouldn’t seat….and it eventually popped on (at 60 psi – yikes!) Still, all’s well that end well. I have two more to fit on my SV & FJ – I think a new tub of fitting soap is in order.
  24. 7 points
    with all the power the nc has i would be worried about the wheel spinning in the tyre!!!!!!!!!!
  25. 7 points
    There is. Use a couple of short 2” lengths of standard garden hose to hold the spacers in place. Push them into the wheel until it is flush with the spacers. Offer the wheel up into position and tap the axle into place with a soft mallet (other hitting tools are available). And viola, the axle drives out the bits of hose through the wheel, out swing arm and the spacers stay put as the axle appears on the other side. Someone else showed me this when fixing a puncture on the road when I’d reached the point of frustration where a fag was very definitely going in the tank of the CRF250 Rally. Always carried a couple of bits of garden hose after that.
  26. 7 points
    Some slipper clutches have a ramp both sides such that under power it grips tighter. It means you can use much lighter springs and have a lighter lever action. Makes it susceptible to release friction in the system. If it went away after cooling it suggests to me an over close tolerance between driven and driving tangs. You could try putting it in gear with engine off and shoving bike backwards. If the clutch lever releases properly that's a sign. If it happens again try it.
  27. 7 points
    Those of us who ride these little bikes know what they are capable of. The only thing you lose out on is speed. I would love to do an extended trip on mine, maybe Norway or Spain and Portugal. The opportunity will come I’m sure, then off we go. 😄
  28. 7 points
    This is the Kingston's Ghost which is the take on a R100 BMW by Kingston M/Cs of Germany. Can't complain about the lack of mudguards on that.
  29. 7 points
    Buy the cheapest. Your local supermarket has a tanker arrive every few days. It never sits in the tanks with rain pouring down the breather. The pump has its seals changed before they wear out to avoid a riot. That £1.70 a litre farm yard halfway between Glen Nowhere and Loch Kalamity only sells to the desperate and last had a delivery when Henry Ford was a lad. The pump and pipes are as filthy as the glass topped dispensers. The UK has fewer oil terminals than distributors, https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_terminals_in_the_United_Kingdom so the brand is largely meaningless. The EU set the spec. HMRC are very keen to make sure the tax is levied correctly and producers make next to nothing, so won't give any extra. The result is that what's delivered is pretty stable. Modern fuels do not like to be stored, hence you want a distributor who shifts it. Andy
  30. 7 points
    Don't they get frustrating? 150 mph bikes when the places you can do 70 are getting fewer? I think I'd enjoy ten laps of a track then want to give it back. Andy
  31. 7 points
    Why on earth not? I make pronouncements like that every day. Most of my favourite and strongest-held opinions are entirely uninformed. My favourite emotion of all time is "righteous indignation", because it just makes you feel so incredibly virtuous. It doesn't seem to matter whether there is any justification or basis in reality - the buzz of a strongly held belief is just as good either way. In fact, perhaps uninformed opinions are even more satisfying because you don't have to take into account any of the nuances and shades that apply when you actually know what you are talking about.
  32. 6 points
    Don’t be too quick to write off slipper clutches as ‘unnecessary frippery’. They allow some among us to keep riding a manual machine when the alternative would be a DCT or T&G. I freely admit that their primary function (avoiding a rear wheel lock up during ham fisted downshifting) is seldom required on the public road, or is it? Maybe newer riders benefit in the same way as ABS benefits us all? But leaving that aside, the light action is of immeasurable benefit to old codgers like myself and Glendon (who should have bought a Triumph anyway.. ) as it allows us to keep on.
  33. 6 points
    Read the above very carefully, I have had my fingers burnt building a Triumph Tiger100, the total cost was over £6000, I learnt a lot, enjoyed waiting hours for Kempton Park to open and got very frustrated when pattern parts made from patterns did not fit, you will master angle grinders and Dremmels.
  34. 6 points
    Have you ridden one, or even just sat on one? I ask because when I first retired I spent ages looking for a 60s Triumph Bonneville to restore as a project. Retiring was a bit of a snap decision and I thought I might need something to do and an old bike seemed like the obvious thing to go for. I got sick and tired of looking at rusted wrecks and bits in boxes and being told by deluded sellers that "Yeah, it's all there, It'll be worth £15k to £20k when it's restored" and then telling me they wanted £5k for the scrap they were selling. Showing them adverts like the one above on fleabay did nothing to persuade them they were asking way too much. Basically they wanted most of any future value without doing any of the work. Bear with, I'm getting to the point. Eventually I gave up and bought a 2009 Bonneville T100 in pristine condition for the same money they were asking for their box of rusting junk. About a year later I was at a bike meet at a local pub and got talking to a lovely chap who was riding a mint 1964 Triumph, it looked and sounded glorious. He'd never ridden one of the new Triumphs and was dying to find out how they compared to his original. I'd never ridden an original and wanted to try one so we swapped bikes and went for a little ride. I was frankly disappointed, they are a very small bike and it felt cramped, people were smaller back then and so were the bikes and to me it felt like I was perched on a bike that was far too small. As fantastic as it looked and sounded I could never have ridden it for any length of time, once I got past the initial thrill I realised that I was glad I hadn't spent a load of time and money restoring one. Other than that the bike was lovely, the engine pulled strongly and was everything I'd imagined......................it was just to damned cramped for me. I have no idea how tall you are of what you weigh but if you haven't tried one then I'd certainly think about it before spending any money.
  35. 6 points
    Quite right - they are. However, anecdotally at least, I would suggest the super-scoot market in the UK is a mere drop in the ocean. Most riders of such bikes are exactly as you would be - an ex biker. And I would have thought an ex-biker would at least be tempted by a much more powerful, nominally better handling (not to mention more familiar) big adventure bike. I know I would be. I guess however if you consider the Forza to be more of a "mid size tourer" it's a bargain - since no one else bloody makes them anymore. Personally the sweet spot for the scooter market seems to be the 300-500 market. Whereby they can usefully undercut the majority of A2 type bikes but the CVT transmission does a good job of glossing over the performance deficit - and the scooter is vastly more practical.
  36. 6 points
    Rocker, we can all find fault with every bike we've had, but the real truth about bike ownership is when you've come back from an enjoyable ride, shut her down and start to walk away, then look back and take another glance. If you smile, because she looks lovely and releases endorphins (just like at half time vs the 'ammers), the bike is for you. If you don't take another glance, she is just transport. It doesn't really matter if the transport is more efficient, handle slightly better or produces less vibes, the backward glance bike is always the one you love best! I would still have my T100 Black if my head had not been turned by an even prettier Z900RS (I understand you don't like them, each to their own). I look at the bike every day with a smile on my face even though she is for sale as my leg ulcer makes it too dangerous if I drop her, I am still thrilled to have her. So, as you would never take my advice, don't go near a Bonnie, all wrong for you, they vibrate like mad and are ugly as sin. In fact even a Ural looks better!
  37. 6 points
  38. 6 points
    That's a coincidence, my lad has just decided he wants to sell his as he's now got a DRZ400 and insurance cost is too high for him to have two bikes. Pity as Dad has just stood him a new YSS shock, serviced the front forks (fresh oil) and done oil & filter change. It's standard apart from end can (he has the original), heated grips, heated jacket power lead and red wheel rim tape & V4 stickers but they actually don't look too bad on the red bike. Will include new front brake pads and Haynes manual if the price is right. He paid £2300 and would like to get close to this ........ as Dad has just spent over £500 on it I think MOT is about 4 months but will put a new one on (again for the right price), not sure on mileage, it's up my lock up so I will check if interested, I think 25/30k? Your chance to scratch the V4 itch and keep the NC. Look after the VFR, don't put starship miles on it and sell it again in a couple of years time for the price you paid for it, go on, you know it makes sense
  39. 6 points
    I have been thinking hard about this and despite the fact that I really like the look of the Bonnie and it’s lower seat having listed all the pros and cons I have decided that it’s extra expense for little gain. I have the CB500X sorted and equipped to my person needs and taste and despite trying other bikes I keep returning to them. The Bonnie is an excellent buy for someone but for once I’m going with my head rather than mu heart. Having said all that I’m hoping to take it for a test ride on Thursday which may change my mind again.
  40. 6 points
    For those curious about how a slipper clutch works
  41. 6 points
    Thanks Tex I actually took this one first. They were apparently mesmerised by the view and it just struck me as being slightly surreal
  42. 6 points
    You're supposed to stand up. Andy
  43. 6 points
    Had you thrown the gloves down in despair?
  44. 6 points
    I used all my bikes daily for commuting, this is my first bike that is for fun only. Mine has to be outside under a cover. I put it on an optimate for first time and touch wood, despite the rain we had today I don’t appear to have fused the entire street yet...
  45. 6 points
    Possibly a good thing that you don’t? I actually like it - it’s funky and fun. Definitely something for the young at heart..
  46. 6 points
    A little twist at the end..
  47. 5 points
    I have been reading elsewhere about the number of bikes coming to the end of their 3 year PCP hitting the dealers, so I thought I’d take a look at the ATs. There are loads on auto trader for between £6.7k and £8k with plenty of choice of DCT or manual and many with full luggage for that. If you don’t feel the need for the latest thing, that means you could have 3 for the price of a new, spec’d up one.😂😂 I’ve certainly heard of a dealer who sold 140 of them in 2016/2017 on low rate PCP getting them all back at the end of their terms when the owners found they didn’t have much value above the final payment. Now I’m sure many of those owners have gone to buy other bikes on similar arrangements, but the dealers are carrying a pretty hefty financial risk, as it’s they who have to clear the final payments, not Honda UK. Many will be going from the dealer straight into the auctions, so if you can get to one of those, there will be some serious bargains.
  48. 5 points
    This is what I always do.
  49. 5 points
    You knew I’d pop up sooner or later😁. Well done Stephen, hope you enjoy it. They are quite happy doing 50 to 55 all day, and you will notice the brakes improve after about 200 miles. The motor will free up a fair bit in 1000 miles. Mine has done 2500 miles now and is going like a (small) train. Have fun Brian
  50. 5 points
    The newer bikes are much, much improved - build quality better, brakes better, mpg probably better. It's no quicker, of course, but it's not meant to be quick There is no better bike(for me) for the countryside and possibly no worse bike for the motorway (barring 125's). It is, however, still a great bike, if that's the type of bike you're looking for! I suspect that most people want something that does it all. I don't think that the Himalayan will suit those folks. I love mine
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