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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 25/12/20 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    This latest lockdown period has got me thinking about a few things and I’m sure I’m not alone in that. For me specifically it’s been about the things I have accumulated around me over 40 years or so. I have been having a bit of a stock take, both mentally and materially. I have been getting rid of a few things like most of my Denon stereo (I’ve kept the amp and tuner) as I’ve switched to Spotify and Bluetooth. Now I’ve started looking at my bikes. Currently I have four, my C90, my Super Cub, my FZS600 and my Suzuki SV650s. I’m beginning to think I could get by with one or two, but let’s say two for a minute. The super Cub is staying, as it’s a complete all rounder for what I want for local trips and touring further afield. I think the C90 could go to someone who’d appreciate it. Then what to do with the sunny Sunday bikes. The Yam is lovely to ride and is near perfect. The Suzuki was bought as an investment for 3 to 5 years time, having only covered 617 miles in 21 years. But if I sold the yam, I’d get to play with a proper V twin again, albeit a small one. So I’m thinking the Yamaha will go in the spring and I’ll keep the SV but ride it as someone should have started doing 21 years ago. I suspect the Super and the SV will see my riding days out to be honest and I could think of worse ways to spend them. I think I’m going to enjoy what I do more and acquire less from here on in. It’s not the stuff that matters, it’s the people we meet and the experiences we get to do along the way I think matter most. I’ve also got a plan to walk across Dartmoor with my tent when the weather picks up. I reckon about three days should do it, to walk from Okehampton back home. It’d be a nice way to stick two fingers up to my MS before it’s too late. I reckon September before that’s possible with restrictions gradually being lifted. Some of you can join me if you want 😂 Just waiting to get out more now and getting fit again.
  2. 21 points
    First ride out on the RS today, just to get some petrol, honest, but, once again (becoming a habit this) I absent mindedly took a wrong turn out of the petrol station and ended up having to do 40 miles to get back home! Silly me. Roads were greasy and damp and bloody filthy! A bit cool too. But the bike was an absolute delight to ride. Despite being a more aggressive posture, I got no wrist, shoulder or neck pains. The seat was as hard as I remember from my 2013 model (which I replaced with one from Samurider), but as I was canted forward, it was not painful this time. Loving the roll on power from any revs – absolutely delicious and very addictive. Suspension is set up ok for me, certainly feel better than the NC750 I had before, turns into corners nice and smartly too. Sounds gorgeous too, much rumblier and more 'fruity' than I've been used to, with the occasional crackle and pop too. Wonderful. A bit 'reluctant' to go from 4th to 3rd maybe? We'll see how that goes, hopefully it will smooth out with more miles. Clutchless up and down shifts are a breeze but the clutch is nicely '2-finger' light anyway. Absolutely love the view forward over the dials and the clip-on appearing handlebars – proper cafe racer. Just need to find some cafes that are open now. Sometime in April that'll be then – maybe.
  3. 20 points
    .... it's in my garage now. Sadly the NC was taken off me in exchange. I concluded even if I regret buying this bike I'd regret it more if I never owned one. The bike has more on it than the dealer advertised which is a bonus including front and rear cameras. I'd like to stay on here as its the best community of people who really know bikes, have a ton of knowledge and pass no judgement other than in considered humour.
  4. 15 points
    ... when Uncle Boris says we can go out to play that is! (and a bit warmer too)
  5. 9 points
    So not bitter Andy, at least there’s that. 😂😂😂😂
  6. 9 points
    Mine from 2014-16 Short answer (sorry Trev) : badly made POS only suitable as a second bike for patient hobbyists. Buy a, Bonneville or Enfield twin. Longer They are fun to ride and have that high torque and high revs combination that makes so many V-Twin's punch above their weight. The shaft drive is fine if cleaning worries you, but it uses a weird oil and is made of cheese so either cost (three oils and drain plugs vs one and a squirt of chain lube) or cost plus stripped drain plugs. The rest suffers from the fact Guzzi are making them as a hobby. No two are the same and the constant changes (mine was a single point injection without any other V7-II feature, so a V7-1 1/2, so you guess if V7 or V7-II parts are correct) mean parts availability is poor and dealer s variable in knowledge. The owners are clueless as a group, note above (sorry guys) how people who owned one for tgree weeks in 1969 think they know how to nail this fog to the ceiling. Yes, it's a small block but Giuseppe has discovered lots of odd bits under his bench since then. They have no concept of water or corrosion issues, mine had water in both the flywheel sensor (placed in the natural gutter between the pots) and speedo unit. The latter is an £800 "sealed" unit. The dealer stole one from his demo bike for me when I got heavy on the warranty. 9 months later he was still chasing Guzzi for one. So 1. Don't buy one. They are rarer than Triumphs and Enfields for a reason. Triumphs and Enfields have the same "pure" bike feel without the Italian rubbish. 2. If you must have one buy second hand. They depreciate like knackered lifts and the warranty is either hopeless or glacial, so why buy it. When you surrender (its the Italian way) and take it to a Honda they hopefully only laugh at what you paid, Yamaha refused to take mine at all. 3.Buy from a dealer that not only has three to choose from, but has a choice if mileages not just lumberjack shirt style artistic interpretations and free beard oil. You need a dealer that has fixed the exact year you are buying, so probably buys them from Guzzi in tens not ones. 4. Get the Haynes book on motorcycle electrics, preferably the one that covers Chinese **** (the logical source when you buy so few) and learn to understand the little bits of redesign that might make one reliable. Hope the previous owner did most of this. 5.Really think about how happy you will be when it needs the battery disconnecting before any cold start, the speedo doesn't work, it is rusty and the dealer totally agrees that 12 weeks to get parts is ****, buy hey, itsa nice-a day for a walk. Andy
  7. 9 points
    Probably best not to buy them too far in advance 😉
  8. 8 points
    I've had Gold Wings for almost 40 years (as well as lots of other bikes) and while I appreciate they are not everyones cup of tea I love them. I'm now 65, just over 5'7" and 11 1/2 stones yet I can handle them and I am quite happy on any sort of road. Wings are so well balanced with a low centre of gravity and you really can ride them just about anywhere. I've covered many, many thousands of miles both solo and two-up in the UK and Europe on narrow lanes, hairpin bends, Fench Alps, Swiss Alps etc., etc. and thoroughly enjoyed them all. Before anyone mentions the width, I've ridden quite a few bikes that are just as wide over the bars and the widest point of a GoldWing is across the handlebars NOT the panniers. I've been quite happily filtering on several occasions when I've been balked by other bikes that couldn't get through due to the width across their panniers.
  9. 8 points
    No. If you need to carry that much, have all those gadgets, stick to the main roads, tune out all noise and vibration , just take a car. They are amazing for what they are but the entire philosophy goes against what I really want in a bike. Andy
  10. 8 points
    Now here’s a nice way to spend a Sunday morning. Old bikes never die, they just go uphill, in Switzerland
  11. 7 points
    To be honest in part it’s in preparation for the arrival of our Tesla in about a year to 18 months time when they bring out their golf sized version in 2022. Management won’t let me have the Model 3 because it’s “too big” and “we don’t need a car that dear”. I listen because she is both wise and the responsible adult. 😁
  12. 7 points
    I've just scratched an itch...6 weeks since having my hip-replacement and I was checking my tyre pressures, due to the bike standing for weeks unused, and couldn't resist trying to sit on the NC, and once there it would have been rude not to just ride around the corner [just to free off the brakes you understand]. It was bliss, and a very encouraging way to gauge my recovery regime. I won't be taking chances and going for a longer ride for a couple of weeks though....
  13. 7 points
    Lol I have my Polite vest all ready to go play at being a 5’6” inch copper !
  14. 7 points
    A two stroke twin (triples are even better) sound great the moment you kick them into life. And I say "life" literally rather than figuratively 🤗. At tickover they kind of miss a beat between each cylinder every now and then like a living-breathing thing. It's randomness is a beautiful thing. Forget Crazy Frog - this is nothing like that, that's a small single. The moment you blip the throttle though, the cylinders all behave and get in line. The smell of two stroke oil is compelling as it wafts up and around the bike. Snick a gear and set off and it feels sedate - almost four stroke-like. As the revs increase there's the familiar linearity until it gets "on pipe" then "Wow!" the sudden push in the back is something else! Not Vtec and nothing quite like any four stroke and not arm wretching as such. More a wave of power, the character of which is totally unique. Ease off and there's a return of that tickover "conversation" between each cylinder. Snick the next gear, open the throttle and off you go again. Hold off a little and it'll four stroke if you keep it at a neutral throttle. Back off completely and (depending on how it's set up) it'll go silent. Then feed the power back in and there's that familiar regimentation again as the revs rise. Then it's gentle linearity once more up to the power band before the arm pull. Bloody marvellous! I think I said before it's like conducting a small orchestra - making music down the road, leaving a cloud of nostalgia miles behind for everyone else to enjoy 😁😁😁. In calm air it carries for miles. Perfect antidote for the modern climate change fraternity.
  15. 7 points
    When I worked for VW/Audi, a customer's Passat was brought to us. One of his outer CV joints had failed and thrown a driveshaft propelling his car into a hedge. He was lucky not to have been injured. He was furious and insisted on a goodwill gesture towards the cost of repair at the very least. The car was about 5 years old and we'd not seen it in our workshop (or any VW) for the last three years. Last stamp in the book confirmed this. His argument was that it should not have failed so unexpectedly, catastrophically and dangerously. I can't remember the mileage but I do remember inspecting the failed drive shaft which showed evidence that the outer CV boot had torn a considerable time before and unsurprisingly not been detected. The failed bearings were completely dry and corroded. VW did contribute to the cost of parts by way of an offer made "without prejudice". Very good under the circumstances.
  16. 7 points
    Well yes, they lack the weather protection..
  17. 7 points
    The mighty SH300i. I dropped the VFR off at the dealership today, just to have a few minor bits sorted that I could probably have done myself, but laying on the freezing ground just isn't that attractive right now . I called them on Thursday to make sure they were still allowed to open and also to ask if I could have a courtesy bike, as my usual lift isn't available today. The last time I was there, I noticed a line of about four CB650R's that all said "Courtesy Bike" on them, so that's what I thought I'd be getting........ Then this little puppy was rolled out of the workshop for me: Must admit, I was sceptical at first - I don't like auto boxes and ever since my (thankfully brief) time with a Yamaha 125, I haven't liked the thought of "small" bikes. However, this thing is great! Plenty of power for getting around town (and, no doubt for motorway miles) and once I'd got used to the fact that the left lever is a brake and not the clutch it was really nice to ride. On the subject of brakes, they're utterly shocking (although, I'm unfairly comparing them to the VFR) and despite the extra weather protection around the legs, I actually found that I was feeling the cold much more on this than on the VFR - possibly because your legs and feet are right next to the exhaust on the VFR. There's a big storage compartment under the seat - I don't think it's big enough for a helmet, but I haven't tried that yet. The keyless system took a little getting used to, it seems to take a few seconds for the system to "wake up" before you can start the bike and I didn't think to ask the chap at the dealership what the buttons on the fob do. All in all, I'm impressed with it. Don't get me wrong, the VFR isn't going anywhere, but if I was looking for a second bike or something fairly inexpensive (running cost wise) to commute on, I reckon I'd go for one.
  18. 7 points
    Electronic on the newer models. The big problem with Vespa, for me, is that MrsT thinks they’re effeminate (or something) and has always vehemently said so. But I had a breakthrough on Friday, we saw a new Super Cub parked up and I had a good look round it. “No!” Says she “You’re not having a moped”. ”Would you rather I got a Vespa then?” ”F*** yeah!” Job’s a good ‘un.
  19. 7 points
  20. 7 points
    I really can't see how a Guzzi V7 is going to see you doing any more spannering than your Honda (if anything it will be less as there is no chain to adjust) as, if I'm correct, you get all your servicing done by the dealer? It will need the same amount of cleaning (which is a highly over rated past time IMO anyway ) as the Honda and, despite Andy's experience, it will (most likely ) not explode in a ball of flame, dissolve into a pile of rust or drain OPECs reserve of rare mineral oils come service time, it will be just another motorcycle, a bit prettier, a bit throbbier and way, way cooler than the NC, if that matters ............... ................ which of course it does
  21. 7 points
    +1 for RE's, this is mine before I went out yesterday
  22. 6 points
    We all know how this will pan out ... You'll sell two ... and buy four!
  23. 6 points
    Thanks for the suggestion, but I’m only about an hour and a half away from there and really want to do it hardcore with my tent and camping gear on my back. My full (pack weight) which I’ve been training with once a week is about 8.5 kilos all up. It might be the last time I do anything like this, so I’m going to do it all in.😂 I reckon on a day and a half to cross the moor (Okehampton to Ivybridge), so one night on the moor and about the same to get from Ivybridge to home through the quite back lanes and footpaths. All that survival and nav training I did when I was younger needs an outlet. Who said mid (late) life crisis.........😂😂😂
  24. 6 points
    Despite (or perhaps because of) my previous ridiculously positive post about how the weather wasn't too bad for riding down here on Costa del Bournemouth, yesterday was just above zero with drizzly rain all day and the odd heavy shower and today is couple of degrees below zero and foggy and set to be the same for a day or two, everything is covered in white, slippery, cold stuff. Soooooooooo....... .......... workshop fun for me with the list including: 1. Clean and refit oil filters to the XS, including the sump filter retaining plate, refill it with oil and cross fingers that the combo of new gasket + smear of Hylomar stops it weeping. Given the state of teh sludge our of the sump filter and how difficult it was to get the sump plate off, I don't think it's been out for decades and this will be it's first 'proper' oil change maybe ever. 2. Now the Frost POR fuel tank refurb kit has arrived, do stage 1 - tank clean on the XS in preparation for derust and seal over the weekend. I had a go with the tinternet suggestions of cider vinegar, worked to a degree and the tank is sold but still way too much surface rust so will only result in a blocked jet again at the least helpful time. 3. Find out all the bits of X7 bottom end I dismantled 3 months ago + the NOS bits n bobs I've accumulated ready refit to the newly blasted, painted and lacquered cases . The rolling chassis is back together and the guy will be doing tank & panels over the next few weeks so my job is to get the motor back together so we can hopefully refit it early Feb. Brand spanking Higgspeed spannies are on our (£) as are Hagon shocks and I now need to bite the bullet and decide what else I order from Suzuki - deffo front mudguard (£198 ) . Could be on the road for Lockdown Lift Day - is that a thing now, will Boris make it a public holiday? 4. Order all the parts I'm missing from the X7 bottom end I dismantled 3 months 5. Assuming they arrive as planned, fit new handlebars to the Himmy, bit of a pain as includes heated grips & hand guards and I have to drill the bars for the switchgear locating pegs, where are my hardened metal drills? That lot should keep me out of Boris' way for a few days and also have my lads rear wheel bearing kit and front pads coming soon for his DRZ so that's next week taken care off as well
  25. 6 points
    These were my other Wings
  26. 6 points
    You mean like my first one
  27. 6 points
    Need to find a way to ditch the hubby so I can do this. I did suggest he could follow with the luggage in an air conditioned car...the suggestion didn't go down well!
  28. 6 points
    The ZRX1100 is one of the best bikes that I have owned. Fantastic in every way and the riding position was 100% spot on for me. It was desparately keen to be ridden properly and I just couldn't do it justice. Wish that I had one when I was younger though.
  29. 6 points
    Update on the NC. I called the Honda shop today to see what's up with the 750. There was a recall on the relay on my 2014 that did not get completed when I had it checked after I purchased it used. So they are replacing the relay. They are saying the harness will be replaced as it was damaged due to the relay. The harness is on back order until March 24th, not that there would be much riding until then. Thank goodness for 2 insured bikes!
  30. 6 points
    Thank you Honda-san, for you are the purveyor of fine motorcycles with some of the dumbest faults known to man... I put my NC750X 17 reg thru its first MoT today and the rear wheel bearings have failed, I knew this was a possibilty as a friend of mine had the same issue on his (Adventurescot are you out there) NC750X which is also a 17 reg. The reason for the post is the cause is known as the distance piece between the rear wheel bearings is too short and does not support the bearing inner races correctly, my friend had this shown to him by an Italian Honda shop who had a fix by using a longer distance piece. The Mot/repair shop I use were aware of bearing failure on the Hondas but not the cause. I asked when they replace the bearings if they can get a measurement of the gap. There is an Italian fix out there, but we need a fix here in Blighty and its probably as simple as a longer piece of steel tube or some shims to take up the slack. If anyone is aware of the Italian bike shop or of the dimensions of the distance piece or has used their own method to remove the slack let us know. For everyone else please check your rear wheel to be on the safe side and remember that there should be a remedy shortly - in the meantime get the bearings changed (not that expensive 6204 bearings I was charged £24 for a pair of SKF sealed type) as they will last long enough for any remedial work to be carried out. Most of all, keep riding if your not all snowed in....
  31. 6 points
    There is a significant part of me that is oh so jealous. It's bikes like that that made me want to ride in the first place - the freedom to eat up the miles on something that imperious and imposing. Marvellous. Many happy miles on it!
  32. 6 points
    Now you can spend ages giving it a damn good wash.
  33. 6 points
    ..... and you bought a Honda? 🤔 😉😁
  34. 6 points
    'cos I know you're all super interested .......................... XS oil filters and sump plate are refitted and 2.5L of golden 10/40 been slurped in. The carbs that I cleaned and serviced last month have been refitted with softened floatbowl overflow pipes that I was able to route between swingarm and crankcases as they're supposed to be. I had to repair a split in the airbox joiner and reoile the bone dry foam filters but this is done and now ready to refit. Stage 1 (the easy part!) of tank derust complete, going to tackle the tricky derusting and recoating tomorrow once new wheel bearings and brake pads fitted to the lads DRZ. Need to make up some blanking plates and seals for the fuel tap holes once I've removed them.
  35. 6 points
    Lock on the garage door had frozen this morning when my bike was delivered, thought I might have to put it in the lounge but the missus shot that idea down. Dunno why. I even said the hall would be ok, but no. No pleasing some people!
  36. 6 points
    I lay money on tyre fitters and doing the rear wheel spindlu=e up with power tool should go up to about 60Ft/lb air go=un 1/2" dose 250 /500 I seen inner spaces rippled ! Grease the bearings and spindle each time it is out! don't over tighten! replace nut if /when it no longer is tight to wind in !
  37. 6 points
    A warranty issue is what a large corporation says is a warranty issue until a court disagrees. Why would they pay out this vast amount of labour to someone who cannot match them in lawyers and will probably never buy another Honda again? Ooh but it isn't fair squeal the peanut gallery. The warm thanks for a job well done will not save the UK warranty manager who has a target to hit on not paying out. The bloke refusing the warranty will not even have to deal with the customer (the system is designed that way to make it easy to say no). My advice would be to get a solicitor and hit the dealer with consumer legislation . The bike was bought from them so how they deal with Honda is their problem. A dealer will only have the same level of legal support as the customer. Make reasonable yet impossible requests such as asking them to return the bike in its original state so it can be examined by an independent expert and obviously state that a missing internal part could hardly seem to be anything except a defect in a goods they supplied . Threaten to seek damages for loss of use of the vehicle (you obviously use it for work) but also ask them for solutions. Hit hard, hit fast, accept the goodwill solution and gagging clause. I know this is disappointing, but it is a fact of life. It is also why Enfield and the Chinese will grow faster. You pay peanuts and get monkeys its annoying. You pay Japanese or Bavarian rates (the sausage eaters invented the modern approach to post sales customer relations) and still get monkeys and you are rightly angry. How many of us refuse to buy a BMW vs how many pay for a extra portion of non-cover? The people who came up with this approach achieved their aim, no one walks out of a showroom because they don't believe the warranty really exists. Andy
  38. 6 points
    They don’t break down as often as a Range Rover. 😂😂😂😂
  39. 6 points
    Reply from EBC Hi Steve, Unless stated on the packaging, none of our pads need the OE shim in place. As for the FA196HH, the OE shim is not needed. Kind regards Gareth Preston Technical Advisor Motorcycle
  40. 6 points
    pretty tough down here in the West Country, many are still living in daub and wattle huts with a straw Roof. And the price they have to pay for them!
  41. 6 points
    During my first biking phase which started in the mid 70's with field bikes and a bit of trials riding, there came a point (1982) when I got sick of the rising insurance costs for running a road bike. I took my test and got a car. My hiatus lasted till 2009. I've had a bike ever since - except for the short period a while back when I had a wobble due to anxiety and depression. Ironically, now I have that under daily management, riding a bike again giveds me a real lift. 👍
  42. 6 points
    I have mine on order with Seven seas motorcycles..Grey imports they are looking in to bringing in..
  43. 6 points
    Maybe time for a change? You could start a new thread...😆
  44. 6 points
    A friend of mine (the real Texan who gave me the ‘Tex’ moniker, but don’t hold that against him) tended to keep his bikes for a while. When someone (frequently myself) told him we were thinking of getting a new bike he would ask “What won’t your current bike do now that it did when you bought it?” Another way of saying that we (frequently) get itchy feet for no good reason. I tried buying with my head (bought the Integra) and look how that went. Buying with your heart is the answer where bikes are concerned (to me, not everyone will agree). Having said that, this is at least three times now that Ciaran has been madly in lust with the V7 - gonna have to do it one day boy..
  45. 6 points
    You know thinking about it it's probably a more cost effective thing to try putting some different tyres on the NC and just getting out there. The T30s on the S aren't as utterly dog t*rd as the Battlewings the X has but they're still average at best. Cold hard reality says that for the sort of riding I intend to do, light national or maybe european touring on a hamstring budget while still capable of eating the miles on an autobahn should I ever make it that far - I've already got arguably the best bike for it. Those greener grasses so often turn out to be astroturf... I think we all have those moments of hankering elsewhere but you kind people have been generous enough to talk through it with me.
  46. 6 points
    All these "pure" bikes have the cleaning issue. Nooks and Crannies full of dead flys and road salt end badly, be it spoke nipples going a little dull on the Triumph, needing to buy an Enfield headlight surround from India and ignoring the mess for months until it arrives or doing ECU error clearing on a V7. Why not concentrate on the where rather than the what on? The NC may be the ultimate beige motorcycle, but you won't care when the scenery is distracting enough. There is also the budget, owning a GS with every item in the Touratech catalogue while not being able to afford a ferry ticket is just silly. If is however highly tempting because you can order today and bring the dream a step closer. In reality you need petrol and knowledge not a gadgets, stuff and the winning cards at a game of top trumps that will never take place while you are busy shopping. If you must shop, buy pen paper and maps. Andy
  47. 6 points
    @Ciaran1602, basically what Trev said elsewhere and Tex said above. 16 years ago I ran a Guzzi California 1100 special for 18 months while I worked away from home in Plymouth before we moved down here. It was used in all weathers for the 130 mile trip to and from at the end of each week and lived outside all week for that period. It stood up to it just fine, despite all the warnings from biking friends that it would leave me stranded/dissolve/fall apart. I do look after my stuff, but it stood up to the use as well as a contemporary Honda. Father in law has just sold his V9 after a couple of years, (he was finding it a bit too heavy now he’s 78 years old and some of his old war wounds are catching up to him) and he rides all year round. No issues with it at all and it was by far his favourite bike. They do have “Character” though, and not everyone can live with that, but if you can they are a rewarding bike to own.
  48. 6 points
    As far as I see it, the main problems with your existing bike are.... Looks great Well built Comfortable Quick Tours well Frugal Paid for. I've probably missed a few but you get my point
  49. 6 points
    A friend of mine in Garstang has one and he loves it more than the GS he had before, him and the wife do a lot of touring loaded up with camping gear etc. As he says, not a flying machine but very capable, good handling bike. Like most Italian things they do not like being left outside so that may be a deal breaker for you, my friend has a garage to keep his bikes in. The Guzzi might be OK under a cover as the only experience I have with Italian stuff is my sons Multistrada which starts to corrode if you open a packet of salted crisps near it. Andy.
  50. 6 points
    Progress. Today we have sparks. This proved both remarkably difficult to photograph and make any sort of double entendre out of (I know you lot like a challenge so feel free), I'm just SHOCKED I couldn't think of one) . Anyhoo, before the argument about how I should say "now" BEFORE I want her to take the picture, see the spark in the plug I'm holding to the crank case while thumbing the starter, never support her, looked funny at that girl who delivered something last week, how her mother was right about me etc. etc. Mrs M did capture a good shot of the extras/spare bits pile The exhaust fasteners are just finishing off in the dishwasher so I predict depending on progress with the divorce we should be playing with petrol early in 2021 😁 Andy
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