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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 15/11/18 in all areas

  1. 17 points
    Just thought I would drop my own experience of the 16K service in here. The price I was quoted by a Honda dealer was £488 for the 16K service on a DCT 2016 NC750X. This prompted me to look at doing it myself. I ordered the oil and filters online and had them delivered for around £60. A quick google video search uncovered some great clips showing how to change the oil and filters (DCT, so two filters needed). A separate video showed the air filter change (which was the biggest faff by far). In total I spent around an hour doing these jobs. Sure I also spent some time trawling this forum for advice (which was invaluable) and finding videos...but now I have the knowledge, I can do the next one in less time. Whilst I was at it I changed both tyres and the front pads, again I was able to see a video of changing the pads. This took me around 2 hours. I've changed plenty of tyres before, but had never changed pads. The pads turned out to be more straightforward than I had previously imagined. I know some people don't like getting their hands dirty, that's fair enough. I also realise that some people are too scared to tackle these jobs and prefer a 'professional' to do it. That's fair enough too, as is the convenience of paying someone else to do it. Personally I enjoyed doing the job myself and I enjoyed saving my hard earned cash too. My main driver is the satisfaction of doing it myself and knowing that it has been done properly. I also got my son to help me, he is just starting out in his motorcycle career and has recently bought his first 125. The videos give you confidence in what you are doing. I have yet to tackle the valve clearances, but looking at yet another video of this it looks very straightforward...more so than changing the air filter in fact. I'll change the coolant at the same time as the radiator needs to be removed to make the valve clearance check easier. At 17K I'm on my third back tyre, second front tyre, second set of front brake pads and second chain. I had one back tyre changed by a local mechanic who has sadly retired now. That prompted me to change the second tyre myself, particularly as my Honda dealer could only do it in 2 weeks time unless I took the back wheel in. If I have to take the back wheel out and drive to the Dealer's place in my car then I may as well source the tyre myself and change it myself and save money at the same time. I guess I should thank them for not being able to complete a simple job in under 2 weeks as that single failure has given me the confidence to tackle it myself and save a fortune too! Once I did one tyre I thought that I may as well do the rest myself too. For the record I found that Michelin tyres go on more easily than either Dunlop or Pirelli.
  2. 12 points
    Today Sue ordered the new CB650R in blue subject to it being able to be lowered . They are due in the dealers in January apparently and Kent M/Cs have put her name against the first blue one in. The good thing is once she gets it that will make it my turn for a new one.😀😀
  3. 11 points
    I want this.
  4. 11 points
    I have made a few changes to my Hetty ( my 2013 NC700X moto), I have given her two new tyres the Mich PR4s, have lowered the rear suspension using the LUST 40mm dog bones and lowered the front suspension by 10mm, shortened the kick stand by 30mm by cutting just below the spring peg and providing a liner then welding it back up. The main stand is now a bit of a problem I may lower that at a later date as it is a bit of a heave to use it. But, what a wonderful enormous difference, if I had had this done by a garage I would have returned it to them saying that they had given me the wrong machine as it was so completely different. The tyres feel superb, much quieter than the Bridgestones and the feel and response from them is amazing and they will get better after they are properly scrubbed in, they give you a real feeling of security and confidence that the moto will do exactly what you want it to, some how the suspension also has a softer feel non of the jarring that I used to get when riding over a bad road surface. The turn in to corners has also improved particularly the slower hairpins corners which there are so many here where I live and also the pitching forward on the seat has also stopped, in fact it has become even more of a delight to ride. I have always done my wheel alignment using the "string method" which unless you have someone to assist you can be very time consuming but I have now purchased one of the ABN Chain Alignment Tools, so easy and quick to use and from what I can see it is possibly far more accurate as it removes so many of the physical variables of other methods. All together a couple of very very enjoyable days work, money well spent and the moto sooo easy to work on. I cannot wait for some winter sunshine to get into the mountains and really enjoy myself.
  5. 9 points
    I have just read a comparison test between a CB500X and an electric Zero DSR Black Forest. The test route covered 293 miles. Both bikes started out fully fuelled/charged. Due to the way the Zero was using its charge the riders decided to limit themselves to 60MPH. The first stop was at 104 miles and the Zero was down to 5% . Once they found a suitable charging point (apparently the normal car charging points were not suitable) the charge took 2.5 hours. The next stop was after 58.5 miles where the Zero was at 26% and the charge took 1.5 hours. Final stop was after another 72 miles Zero was at 28% and charge took 2 hours. By this time it was dark and they had to slow down due to the poor lights on the Zero. In contrast the Honda had done the entire trip on one tank which took £22 to fill and still had fuel left. Having averaged 81MPG. With regards to cost the Zero is £21,085 although there is a £1,500 government refund on that whilst the Honda cost £5,959At the moment I can see electric bikes being the answer for short commutes but until both the range is increased and the price decreased I can’t see them being for most motorcyclist.
  6. 8 points
    Ffs don't Google "penis dipped in cheese". I bet not many recipes come up. Now what I'd love to believe is that the bloke who named the machined plating process knew his Greek and was enjoying listening to his boss telling everyone what to do with goats bits and cheese 😂 Andy
  7. 8 points
  8. 7 points
    Just had a day in the garage fitting bits & pieces, not been on a ride yet because it's raining, but I'm quite pleased with the results......... Fenda Extenda & extra mudflap, rad guard, Givi screen, Puig visor, R & G shock tube, Ogio tail pack, Ctek connector in the frunk and a strap modification to the dolly so that the bike is more upright on it but can't tipple to the right ! Till I get a few miles in on it and see what else I need that's about it for now....!
  9. 7 points
    My CB500F will cruise at illegal speeds and do 500 mile days. Can't think of anything it wouldn't do. The Rally Raid lady (name evades me, but I've been in the Bier Keller/German market since dinner time, so not surprised) seems to agree and has done trans-USA trail runs on the X to the extent they are only doing that and the BMW for the Charlie crowd (no NC or AT stuff) . K60's come in 19-inch and given how they work on heavier bikes (Bonneville, V-strom and R1100's for me) they would be high on my list of possibles. Andy
  10. 7 points
    Whenever I see MIL I read Mother in Law and this comes to mind... Need to be of a certain age to understand.. (Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin)
  11. 7 points
    I was out on mine today, just over 140 miles of A, B and tiny back lanes and it reminded what a great piece of kit it is. As it was dry I was going to take the Guzzi V7 but chilly weather meant the lure of heated grips and power take off for my Kies waistcoat was too strong. Glad I did, the V7 is growing on me and has heaps of character but for getting a real hustle along on the type of roads I like then the AT is hard to beat. The suspension is I feel the key, not only does it cushion the rider from all but the very, very worse our roads can throw at it but it also means the tyres spend most of their time on the ground and the mass of the bike rarely gets unsettled, even at decent corner speeds. The only time it's a bit ungainly is at a standstill when trying to paddle it around, combo of height + weight + slippery wet leaves nearly caught me out a couple of times today when I stopped to check map for directions. Oh and the bloody traction control, I forgot to turn it down a couple of notches after a restart and pulled onto the A303 from a T junction, there was a camper van trundling along so I pulled out, gave it full hurrufftter and the bloody thing popped, banged, fizzled and farted as it got it's knickers in a twist trying to keep the front wheel down. One of the joys of my old (non traction control) NC was you could just wind the throttle wide open and roll it off when you reached the desired speed, although not rocket ship, the AT has a bit too much oomph for that ....... although it's fine if you remember turn the traction control down. Fuel consumtion for me is 48-52 mpg on the sort of day above (75-85 on A roads), easy to get 65+ mpg if ridden at Enfield sort of speeds.
  12. 7 points
    Rally Raid offers 19" and 17" conversion of Africa Twin for those who prefer more on-road handling and tubeless tyres:
  13. 6 points
    Hi Ciaran, Although never had the bike that was parked outside but I would definitely recommend trying ACF50. I myself had treated my all bikes with ACF at least twice a year and never had problem with rust (even when I was commuting daily on my NC all year round). Therefore give the bike a good clean first and let it dry. Then spray it with ACF50 (they come with pump spray bottles) avoiding tyres, brakes and seat. Anything else can be sprayed and rubbed with soft cotton cloth. Other than protection the bike will look nicer and shiner (almost like new) when covered with ACF. Give me a shout if you need help as it is a bit time consuming job to reach all nooks and crannies.
  14. 6 points
    Yep...probably after I stop commuting into London...but then if I stop commuting I will want a different style of bike....there will be hard decisions made! Trying to persaude Mr that he needs to sell his car and let me have the garage space....then I can havr NC, Bonneville or Bobber and a Vespa...
  15. 6 points
    Sigh, SS50 5 speed, my first (legal) hurrumph, road bike. I paid 45 quid for it and rebuilt it for not much more. My mates sold their souls, on the drip, for fancy RD and DT 50's. Suckers, I used to pi*s all over them, scraping those funky pedals on the corners. Oh my.... imagine me and my pie belly on one now.
  16. 6 points
    Get the Cub. You will of course need a top-box
  17. 6 points
    I had a Beverly for 3 years. Loved it. I'm thinking of getting another one and have my eye on a possible candidate as we speak. The downside is that these are the scroat's choice for speedy getaways from crime. I reported one cruising my area Friday, two-up, no number plate, riding slowly checking out people's property fronts. Fortunately I had already closed my garage door having put the X-ADV away before they came past... twice. 10 minutes later a police BMW went up my street looking for them. Fingers crossed they've been knocked off and killed.
  18. 6 points
    If your son has a child ask for their opinion and average the two.
  19. 6 points
    Closest I ever got to a full touring bike was a K100RS, more of a ‘sports tourer’ really. Bloody good bike (in it’s day). After breakfast in a Scottish B&B an older lady was putting her suitcase in her car and watched me put an overnight bag in a pannier. “I never knew BMW made motor bicycles” she said “Oh look! It’s got a little boot for your luggage! And it has one on the other side too. How clever!” The Integra made a great little tourer, but I never really made the most of that side of it.
  20. 6 points
    MIL function can take various forms. Some faults will be so called "latching" where they are considered significant enough to cause the MIL to remain lit until the fault code is manually cleared, or they can be "non-latching" where the MIL can be extinguished once the system determines that whatever caused it is no longer present, however even non-latching faults may result in the MIL staying on while the engine continues to run, and will only self-reset on a restart. I don't know what the legislative requirements are for bikes under today's regs., most of this sort of stuff is laid down by powers that be. One thing which I know can sometimes cause temporary glitches is when the system uses running parameters as ongoing reference settings, air/fuel settings for starting etc. I've come across even relatively recent vehicles which if started when slightly warm then immediately stopped and left to get fully cold can then prove reluctant to start. I don't know for sure but that sort of thing can be due to insufficient cycles for the system to obtain a valid set of values, and it reverts to a default which may not always be totally appropriate. Once running and having gone through an adequate time it will sort itself out again. If it sorts itself out when turned off and on again, don't lose any sleep as long as it doesn't become frequent.
  21. 6 points
    Well Honda Forza 300 it is then! I have ordered a Black Metallic Gloss one (the fastest colours) from Honda Doble and I collect it Monday! For me it's very exciting as I have never purchased a brand new bike (or car). I have part ex my Integra which is quite sad for me as I have ridden it daily for nearly two years. It was my fast larger capacity machine and unlikely to be my last. Brilliant machine but it will age and lose its value and I think a lighter machine is the smart choice. It comes with two years warranty, taxed, mot as new and brakedown cover. I negotiated the first service free as he wouldn't budge on the part exchange even though Yamaha offered 200 quid more. I wish to still check on this forum as folk seem a good bunch. I may get a latest model NC Integra when they come down in price maybe in two years. Regards Aaron
  22. 6 points
    Glad you are sorted. I dispare though. They were doing so well, no fault stored, no obvious fault, no charge, nothing more they can do today, go ride it. Then they tell you its caused by sun spots or the Gods being angry or the time of the month or the fact the bike they sold you doesn't meet the IP rating it's required to. This is ******s. If wet weather makes the light come on, it has a fault, probably a wiring loom fault that they will need to diagnose and fix. It will only likely be possible to diagnose and fix economically when it is less intermittent, so they are right, best go ride it. The "Electrikery of the loom fairies be much much confusing us" stories are best ignored. Andy
  23. 5 points
    I picked up my first RC truck Thursday evening, once home I found it impossible to hand over to the missus for wrapping, so I had to pull rank as a 49 year old kid and say bugger to Xmas, I'm having it now. 👍 As Ive waited months and months, the missus doesn't mind. Result. Ive had a go around the local park and I love it, even as it is out of the box. Ive just lined the inner shell with duct tape where the tyres rub and around the post holes, and added a few of the decals included. Ive also cleaned yesterday's crap off and give all the relevant parts a mist of silicone spray. I know I should've done this before using it but I just had to try it out. It's electric but has On Board Audio, speakers and a control box wired into the speed controller giving a raw recording of a 900 HP short course truck engine and I have to say it sounds bloody awesome. Anyway, here it is, my new Slash 2WD OBA And I managed to get it in the colour scheme that I wanted 😃 And now im off round a local gravel car park for some more fun. 
  24. 5 points
    Keep it up Andy, us old coffin dodgers need the likes of you to keep paying us the pension. Andy.
  25. 5 points
    You coffin dodgers just go out and enjoy yourselves. I'm happy running about in the repmobile, paying tax and keeping the countrys transport network running. I'm not at all jealous. Andy
  26. 5 points
    I'm forwarding this to Admin, to see if this type of thing is acceptable 😂
  27. 5 points
    I'd have a Cub tomorrow if I could afford a second bike. I've briefly considered trading the NC for it and using it to run round the city! There's something so timeless about it, aesthetically and mechanically. Plus it's got 50 years of history and the ghost of old man Soichiro himself sat on it's surprisingly broad shoulders.
  28. 5 points
    Bought around two weeks ago and finally fitted in the space of 45 minutes. Simple to fit and it appears to be very simple in principle. I am going to run it at quite a heavy rate in this very wet weather to keep the chain properly lubed. Will report back what I feel about the delivery rate and the ease of topping it up etc... comes will a little bag to cover the oiler when you wash the bike with chemicals etc. And yes, I will turn the cable tie ends around later on when I've got more time!! Lots of slack in the tubing behind the foot hanger. But not so much slack that it can be caught in the chain. Should cope with swing arm movements. I used another cable tie to tidy up the bottom loop near the chain, that is shown further up. Very dirty roads here in London.
  29. 5 points
    Laguna are offering a new (pre reg) Tracer 700 for £5550! Almost tempts me as a second bike! https://www.motorcyclenews.com/bikes-for-sale/yamaha/tracer-700/3587047/
  30. 5 points
    Ordered a Cub today for March. About time I grew up really, but what the hell. Geoff.
  31. 5 points
    I had a test ride on one today. It decided to tip down as I was going down the A23/M23 towards the M25. As you say very smooth and deceptively quick. You can very easily being doing 50mph without realising it and as I accelerated down the M23 it was up to 80mph again without realising it. Screen was OK but could probably do with an adjustable lip to fine tune it. What was remarkable was that my gloves were staying dry. I think the mirrors must act as a deflector. Very comfortable and effortless handling. Did not seem as grunty as the XMAX but low speed handling seemed much easier and confidence inspiring. Seating is effectively lower than the XMAX. I don’t think there is much in it height wise so the Forza must be slightly narrower. I could certainly foot down much easier. All in all a very nice ride. Still haven’t made any decisions yet.
  32. 5 points
    Hello all, just a little update on the Forza 300. I have had a top box carrier fitted by Honda when it was new but I don't think they had a new top box or it would have been far too expensive. Anyway I sourced a genuine Honda black one secondhand and it was from a Honda S-Wing 125cc. It fitted perfectly and in theory Honda use a similar mounting system on the SH125, PS125 and possibly the SH300. I have been having issues with the seat latch on my bike as it seems the hasp or stable part is not lining up to the latch properly and no matter how much slamming or pulling the seat won't close. Hopefully Honda can resolve it during its first 700 mile service which will need doing in the New Year as I have added 400 miles already. Great smooth and quiet little bike though! Now with a Urbano Tucano leg warmer and Oxford Advanced Heated grips I believe its the ultimate all year round commuting machine. In fact I have named it the 'Black Bullet' or BB ha ha! But its deceptively fast and you can be travelling at 50 mph without realising and its so agile and light, really well balanced.
  33. 5 points
    It'd be ideal for family days out.
  34. 5 points
    There are many other bikes that compare to the AT on all sorts of levels, but what is one to do having fallen in love with the DCT on an NC, but liking the idea of a larger all rounder good for both daily riding and touring two up?
  35. 5 points
    I had a couple of those. A blue one when they first came out and later a red one that was good enough to take us on honeymoon. In the Domplatz Koln At Spa for the GP In York for our Honeymoon
  36. 5 points
    I cannot imagine what either £14K bike does that a £7.5K V-strom doesn't, except maybe require a bit less ACF-50 and tick a few fashion/voices in your head boxes? A Rally Raided CB500 or KTM would also be worth a look. If these were the only choices I'd pick Honda as likely to have put the cash into development instead of advertising the extended warranty trap, but that is only based on one person's experience over ten years ago. Andy
  37. 5 points
    Perhaps it’s a generational thing then? I doubt Simon Cowell was even born when I took my first faltering steps in the industry. And I have been retired 10 years next month You’re probably more in touch with current practices than I am so I will listen to what you say. But I still struggle to accept that someone completely unqualified can do a better job (having watched a You Tube video FFS!) than a properly trained dealership mechanic who will have done numerous factory courses in addition to his NVQ etc. Bit of a kick in the teeth for folks like, say, Trisaki is it not?
  38. 5 points
    I've done a fair bit of professional development work on air cleaners. In the UK today the air quality is pretty good compared to how it used to be (coal fires etc), and we don't generally have high dust concentrations. Small particulate matter (soot, diesel particulates etc are bad for this) is what tends to cause filter clogging, larger dust usually stays reasonably porous when in the airbox so doesn't impede airflow as much. Filter media are progressive, the dirty side has a relatively open weave/matrix which catches the big stuff, then it gets progressively finer going towards the clean side. This maximises the dirt capacity for a given pressure drop increase. I work on 25k miles as a perfectly reasonable life for most air filters in the UK, and if you're in clean areas (Scottish highlands etc) you could happily extend it further. Different markets will have different environments, some of the worst being Australian dirt roads with dust like talcum powder which cakes in my experience You'll usually notice that dirt accumulates in one patch on an air filter. This is intentional. If the incoming air is directed at one area the larger dirt particles will accumulate in that area and leave the bulk of the remainder of the filter relatively clean, extending the service life. Just one tip on the valve clearances. Take care engaging the cam cover fixings and don't overtighten. Only turn the engine in the correct forward direction (OK, that's 2 tips) in order to not load the camchain tensioner, the engine turns in the same direction as the wheels.
  39. 5 points
    I can honestly say that in my fifty years of twirling spanners for a living I never met anyone who wasn’t trying to do a good job. Some were better than others, true. But the same can be said of any profession from dustbin men to doctors. And (seeing how we’re pointing fingers) I love it that the OP claims to have done the job ‘properly’ then admits he never checked the valves..
  40. 5 points
    just couldn't resist😁
  41. 5 points
    I run three bikes all with tubeless and do about 15,000 miles per year so I get through a lot of tyres. The best thing I did was to fit my own. All you need is a compressor and a bead breaker. I got my compressor from Lidl (about £ 70) and I made my own breaker which is bolted to my garage wall (otherwise £30) So it pays for itself pretty quickly. Also very convenient - I try to plan ahead and buy tyres in bulk so I've got them when they're needed. And handy for fixing punctures. I usually buy from M&P/Busters (I think they're the same people) good prices and fast delivery. As you see I'm keen on Avon tyres Home-made bead breaker This stand lets me balance the wheels
  42. 5 points
    Just read this months edition of RIDE, which they tested 22 headlight bulbs, including one LED. The LED, which was a 'suitable' replacement for H4 type performed terribly, and came last. £6 OEM manufactured by Phillips was 4th £23.99 for two Osram X-Racer (bike specific) was 3rd £19.95 for two Osram Night Racer 110 (bike specific) was 2nd £17 for two Phillips X-Treme Vision +130 was 1st
  43. 5 points
    I'll just bring up a couple of points, but really it warrants a whole essay. I'll spare you that <sighs of relief>. Firstly, I think Hickky's summary of the current state of play in his first sentence (above) is spot on. Motorcycles seem primarily to be about styling (GP racers, off-roaders, Transformers), with performance the other major factor. Pretty well everything else gets ignored. "But not the NC!" I hear you say. But yes, I'm afraid the NC too. The "Adventure" styling contributes absolutely nothing whatsoever to its functionality, and in fact it works to its detriment. The seat is at least two inches higher than it needs to be (three inches for the passenger), all because Adventure-style bikes must have an enormous gap above the back wheel (even though the suspension travel is six inches if you're lucky). Also, no motorcycle is allowed to have mudguards that work because it would spoil the styling, so the NC (like almost all modern bikes) has no back mudguard, and the front mudguard is vestigial and about as much use as your appendix. When spray off the front wheel travels vertically up past the head stock and lands on the instruments (a la Suzuki DL1000, amongst others), then you know something is deeply dysfunctional. It's not just the NC - almost every bike puts styling front and foremost. Again, Hickky says it well in his first sentence. He says "What new do you want?", as if Transformers styling is already new, but really it isn't. There is very little new in the motorcycling world, but something different would be very welcome. Just basic stuff like I've banged on about before would be appreciated. Mudguards front and rear that wrap right round the wheels and catch all the muck and spray.* A fully enclosed drive chain (if you must have a chain)**. Stainless steel fasteners throughout and genuine protection against salt-laden roads. I want to see far more experimentation with the front end: girder forks***, leading link, hub-centre steering, wheel-centre steering, etc, etc. All of these have been tried before, many of them may not work, but I want to see some serious R&D in this area and some proper choices, instead of "telescopic forks or take a hike". I want to see my first hybrid motorcycle. An all-electric one I can afford. I reject Hickky's assertion that the Niken "ain't a bike", except in the most literal sense. In spirit it certainly is, and I take my hat off to Yamaha for having the courage to try it in a deeply conservative market. And there's the rub: bikes are the way they are because most of the bike-buying public is deeply conservative. If the rider can't feel like Rossi (or his off-road equivalent) when he's riding it, then he won't buy it. If it doesn't look like a million dollars and impress his mates, he won't buy it. There are exceptions. I said "he" above because I think the great majority of customers are men. I don't claim to know what women value in a bike, but in any case there probably aren't enough female buyers to influence the market except in developing world countries where bikes like the Cub are their primary mode of transport. Interestingly I also think most people on this forum are exceptions, as our taste in bikes seems far more eclectic, and we focus more on utility than the average motorcycle buyer. Even with us, though, I've noticed that whenever someone posts a link or a picture of a bike they like, most of the initial comments are about how it looks. As if the looks matter in some way. Hickky describes motorcycling as a pastime of the elderly (although I would say it begins in middle age, when more income becomes disposable), as if that is relevant to the state of the market. I don't think it has anything to do with age. I've noticed that the older members in this forum are amongst the most willing to try out "different" bikes that don't comply with the looks-and-performance-above-all mantra of the main market. Perhaps it is the middle-aged man who wants a new toy and needs something to reaffirm his fading masculinity, that shapes the market. Whatever it is, motorcycles sell in such small numbers that the manufacturers are reluctant to take risks with anything "different" (again, hats off to Yamaha, and Honda for the DCT). People like me (not just me, but many of us in this forum) - who yearn for more variety, technically adventurous engineering, more utility, and more choice - have to do without. * Royal Enfield Bullet ** C90, MZ *** Brough Superior
  44. 5 points
    Just got back from Honda diagnostic check, nothing showed up so sent away with if it happens again and wont reset by re-cycling ignition bring I back. (Apparently wet weather can sometimes cause erroneous readings). Nice touch whilst in the workshop they checked tyre pressures and put air in the rear which was a couple of PSI low. Was expecting a small bill but it was done complimentary. Thanks Chatfields Honda
  45. 4 points
    I certainly wouldn’t want to argue scooters with you Dave (you’re my ‘go to’ expert on those) but the above sentence highlights the problem for me. To me, the more ‘maxi’ you put into a scooter the less ‘scooter’ remains. I actually regard the maxi scoot as an ‘advanced motorcycle’, which is great for doing some touring or whatever but (in my experience) is less great in traffic. Try keeping up with a Vespa as it worms it’s way to the front of the queue for the lights! I see a ‘scooter’ as being a step through design with a ‘seated at the dinner table’ riding position. Vespa, SH300 etc and a perfect companion to a ‘proper’ motorcycle. The maxi scoot (advanced motorcycle) is something to replace a bike. Speaking personally if I bought a Forza I would, possibly, never want to ride the Bonnie again. If I bought a Vespa I would be able use each for what they’re best at.
  46. 4 points
    No, but you knew that 😂 oh and you seemed to have left this bit out 😉 Did you ever find Salisbury Plain by the way 😱 (Yes I said that) 😎 You're welcome to join me on a ride to the Dolomites and back next summer, I'll try not to leave you too far behind😇 Or if you can't spare the time, for a day trip, how about joining me for a National Rally full Gold run 🤔 1st weekend of July.
  47. 4 points
    Cub for me. Its based on the best selling, do anything vehicle ever. The competition as something to get people moving is the Army boot. Ride to work, deliver pizza or ride round the world, its ancestors did the lot. Nothing against the Monkey bike of course, but something designed to entertain hippies and surfers just doesn't quite tick the same boxes for me. If quicker turning is your thing, the little wheels could well be for you though. Andy
  48. 4 points
    You do realise that £70 per hour has to cover many things like rent, rates, insurance, heating, lighting, equipment, phone calls to order parts, etc. I will admit however that some dealers go over the top with rates they charge, my local guy charges £45 per hour plus VAT and even then some folk moan about it, you can't please all the people all the time. Andy.
  49. 4 points
    Everyone to their own but personally I found the power differential between the NC750 and the AT night and day. Both bikes were very good. The most significant difference, to me, was the suspension. The ride on my Integra was at times quite jarring, particularly through the forks. The suspension on the AT, when used in the road, was palatial.
  50. 4 points
    Happened on my X once. Turned it off and on, sorted. Even multi million pound aeroplanes I work on do it. Everyone gets in a tiz, turn it off and on, sorted. (When on the ground)
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