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  1. Tex

    Tex

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  2. slowboy

    slowboy

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  3. larryblag

    larryblag

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  4. Andy m

    Andy m

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 07/11/19 in all areas

  1. 22 points
    Got the new bike at last after the release of the new RS was delayed from March until September. A slight health glitch with me being laid low with a kidney stone threatened to delay things, but fortunately after a morning in A&E it sorted itseIf out in time! I have to say that the dealer, and Mark the salesman in particular, have been extremely helpful in making it possible for me to run a new GS for six months while I was waiting, without it costing me an arm and a leg to change, partly due to them putting together a good deal for both bikes, and partly by them helping me to get a significant contribution from BMW towards the RS in recognition of me having to cancel the original RS order when the bike was delayed. I've included a picture of me picking up the bike just to prove to Andy that not all BMW dealer staff are his suited lizards, but are actually human beings! A friendly bunch in PidCocks in Nottingham, and they all seem to be enthusiastic bikers, and in Mark's case he has raced in the past and is planning to get back into it next season. Initial impressions of the bike, riding it back from the dealership are very positive. In particular, a much slicker gearchange than the GS, approaching Japanese standards, and unlike the demonstrator RS I rode, no problems in finding neutral. The bike has all the optional packages, except that I deliberately omitted the GSAP (Gear Shift Assist Pro quickshifter). I never used this on the last bike, and don't like using these devices as I believe they inevitably put more strain on the transmission, and it saved a useful £500 or so! I suspect the nicer gearshifting may be something to do with this too as the lever now goes directly to the gearbox and not via the quickshifter gadget which introduces some play into the system which I suspect it what makes it hard to get neutral on bikes so equipped. Not a big fan of personalised numberplates, but Mark found one of the available registration numbers they had available ended in my initials FB, so I though why not, so that was kind of cool!
  2. 22 points
    Mate, I've battled with clinical depression my entire adult life. So far I've had five major episodes, two which left me curled up in bed in a foetal position, crying for my mum. At it's worst it is the most appalling of diseases and honestly, there simply aren't any words to describe the hideous, black, profound despair. Mine began at the age of 21 with a sudden dizzy spell. It took months before anxiety was diagnosed, and back then they dished out valium (diazepam) like sweets. I've got to say, it worked brilliantly, and for a couple of hours I'd feel wonderful. I once was prescribed a full year's worth of 5mg tablets - 360 in a large brown bottle! Nowadays you're lucky to get four. Although not technically addictive, they are in effect because their efficacy drops off as your body habituates to the drug, so you need ever larger doses (or more frequent doses). In truth they are only useful for short-term relief of serious anxiety symptoms. I went through my twenties battling with chronic anxiety symptoms, and as I entered my thirties it gradually morphed into more classical clinical depression. Nowadays anxiety and depression are regarded as symptoms of the same disease. Or rather, anxiety is one of the symptoms of clinical depression. I spent the next twenty years searching for an effective treatment. As well as working my way through the traditional SSRI anti-depressants (prozac, et al), I tried every alternative and complementary therapy I could find. Faith healing, homoeopathy, Bach's flower remedies, aromatherapy, reflexology, group psychotherapy, individual psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, Transcendental Meditation, blah, blah.... the list is very long. In truth, it cost many thousands of pounds and not a single one of them made the tiniest jot of difference. I went from being open-minded about complementary therapies and all that stuff to being utterly sceptical. I'm of the view that they are all complete bollocks - or rather, nothing more than placebo. Things turned around for me at about the age of 50. My research revealed a drug called venlafaxine. It is an SNRI (that is, it acts upon two neurotransmitters) and is regarded as amongst the most effective of anti-depressants. The side effects experienced by some people (heart arrhythmia due to it messing with the neurons that carry the "beat" signal) - but never by me - mean it is not widely prescribed by GPs any more, and now it is mostly used in psychiatric hospitals as a "next level" drug. Anyway, my GP agreed to let me try it, and although - like all anti-depressants - the effect was not immediate or transformative, I gradually realised that whilst I was taking venlafaxine I didn't get any major episodes. At the age of 54 I was carefully weaned off it by the GP, thinking I was cured. Six months later I had another breakdown so I went back on venlafaxine, and - touch wood - I've had no episodes since. It hasn't cured me. I still struggle with chronic, low-level depression and anhedonia (inability to feel pleasure) over the winter months, but I've now found a way of managing my life to make it tolerable. One other major thing I noticed: stress is definitely a trigger for a depressive episode, and in truth I learned that my threshold for stress is very low. So as well as the drug treatment, I have now adjusted my life and my career to avoid as much stress as possible. It has held me back, but it's something I've got to live with. I'm writing this because I wanted to say that physical symptoms have been a major part of my disease. I've had heart attack symptoms, stroke symptoms, and no end of gastro-intestinal disturbances of all kinds. Sometimes the stomach problems are so severe I literally can't eat. I once remember doing battle with a Rich Tea biscuit, and it took me over an hour to force it down. The last time I had an episode severe enough to put me in bed, I lost three quarters of a stone through starving. Interestingly, one of the very first symptoms of an episode is diarrhoea, and it is now a reliable warning that I'm on the edge of an episode. The diarrhoea begins even before I've noticed any emotional disturbance. Speaking personally I've not noticed much cognitive decline during depressive episodes, but loads of people do and it is really very common. I would consider it as a dead-cert symptom of depression, from what you've said, and not worry about anything more sinister. Sorry to go on at such length - I just wanted to give you as much detail as possible in case any of this is familiar and you can relate to it. Depression can be a creeping, insidious disease that takes years to reveal its true nature, meanwhile causing all sorts of unpleasant, worrying symptoms. Take heart - it isn't curable, but it is definitely treatable.
  3. 21 points
    Sometimes things come along that you don't expect, don't they. Sort of out of the blue as it were🤔 The last couple of months I found myself keep looking at one bike in particular, one which seems to have so many fine features. Especially so as I like retro styled bikes. Anyway, wasn't really thinking that hard but I was looking at a review, when management looked over my shoulder and said you like them don't you. I confessed I did. So why don't you get one if you like it that much. We'll because I also like this one. We'll decide which one you want and why not get one. Seriously? Yes. So today I went to look at both, and having had a good sit and poke around each, came to the conclusion that while I would like both, one suited me more (and I was only authorised for one😇) and it would be a nice addition to the stable. So I came home, did a bit of research and then found someone doing a really good deal that my local dealer, having been given the chance, couldn't (wouldn't) get anywhere near so a couple of phone calls later, with a bit of haggling, my new bike should be delivered to the house before Christmas. Timeless design, sensible mudguarding, fully enclosed chain, single seat, neat touring rack, you've guessed it, he's only gone a bought a new Honda Super Cub. In Blue, with a rack and a racing red seat.😀 (And the one I didn't buy, a Honda Monkey, but it was a close run thing) Sometimes you've got to indulge yourself, if only a little bit😉 Oh and it's got tubeless tyres, to keep Tex happy😂😂😂😂😂
  4. 14 points
    Garry, I'm sorry to hear of your depression but glad you are getting some medical help. Of course it comes as a surprise as you come across as an extrovert, fun loving, happy comedian type chap. Maybe it is related to 'balance' or cover up. I don't know, sometime that is my way of dealing with feeling down or facing a sad event is to turn to humour. But what I do know and what I want you to know is that you are among friends who care for you and that you make a big difference and contribution on here. When you were absent for a while the place just wasn't the same and you were missed. You touch our lives and cheer us up with your humour, videos, alternate view of things etc. Maybe like 'it's a wonderful life' you are depressed but don't realise the positive contribution you make on others. You are much better at sharing than I am, hopefully that helps you realising that others care. Don't disappear again becase we would be worrying. There are lots of people that are in a similarsituation but don't admit it so it may seem like you are the only one when you are not. Personally I find my bike and a special place a great therapy, so when I am feeling down I go out for a ride and short walk to my special spot, admire the beaty of the coast, mountains, forest, wildlife and see the big picture and my problems seem to get put into perspective. Good luck Garry!
  5. 13 points
    Oops! Posted this in entirely the wrong place (Tenere' 700) but that's my head at the moment. Apologies. I repeat it here. A bit of better news, the doctor thinks the counsellor has it completely wrong and that my memory issues are more a symptom of the depression I'm struggling with. To make sure, she wants to see me and Kels together on Thursday so she can do some memory tests and ask Kelly how I am at home. She is also going to refer me for a neurology appointment which she admits is a bit extreme but that's because the "memory clinic" for dementia isn't available for someone so young (thanks for that Doc ). Though think that particular policy is a bit awry. Signed off for another month due to my safety-critical role. She has also ruled out any appropriate medication until the results of my tests/checks so as not to distort any results. Thanks all, for your support, it's been most welcome. It's a difficult thing to talk about despite the very positive media coverage of late which tries very hard to dispel the stigma. Still no DL650 G
  6. 11 points
    Daytona 900. Lovely lovley bike. Smooth and steady, enough power to have fun and kept its looks and quality over the years.
  7. 11 points
    I’ve two. The old XJ900 I had being the main one. Mine was bought for about £1500, had a good 50k on the clock when I had it and I put a lot more besides in. Rain, sleet, snow, storms, ice, I rode this thing around half the country and it never missed a beat. Only work I had done was a service and front wheel bearings. I even dropped it twice and beyond smashing an indicator it didn’t have a mark on it. I wish I still had it today. The second was the FZ6S2 (attached). Being an S2 it had 100bhp which for a pretty light 600 seemed amazing back when I owned it. Again totally reliable, slightly tatty with corrosion but nothing major. Howling down a slip road on this is still the most fun I’ve ever had in a bike. She sounded like a tortured banshee and Felt like she could outdrag the universe (even if this was very much an illusion!).
  8. 11 points
    Given the number of car drivers I see apparently unable to see and hear emergency vehicles on "blues and twos", I find it hard to believe that a noisy exhaust will be of much use. Also, any time I've had a 'weekend warrior' whizz past me on the twisties, I usually don't hear the git until he's scared the excrement out of me ... So I'm pretty sure a noisy exhaust is of little to no use as a 'safety device' and just pisses (nearly) everyone off.
  9. 11 points
    Thanks so much everyone for your tremendous support A proper consultation with a very nice, upbeat GP lady yesterday helped no end to be honest. It's nice to know I'm appreciated on this forum too - even sans bike. But I knew this of course One day at a time for now, I've had a very positive day today. Xxx
  10. 11 points
    I think humour is important. When I got ill, and while they were still running diagnostics, I started to slur my speech and struggled to say things. I just couldn't get the words out, I knew what I wanted to say but my mouth wouldn't cooperate. One evening in the pub I was trying to say something and stalled when my daughter, who shares my sense of humour, started to try and guess what the word I was struggling with. Of course all her suggestions were completely ludicrous and pretty soon we were all laughing so hard it hurt. After that all my friends started doing it and it cheered me up no end. I'm sorry to hear that you're not well and hope you feel better soon. Let the vets do their thing and get better, I never expected to get well, at one point I thought it was good night Vienna. That slowly changed to I'll live but won't ever work again to well I'm back part time I wonder if I'll ever be well enough to work full time to deciding that I felt so well that I'd take early retirement and enjoy life as much as possible and here I am. I never really expected to live this long....................................
  11. 11 points
    I've got one for a couple of weeks in NZ early next year so will let you know what it's like, first impression is pig ugly thing .... the bike
  12. 9 points
    This, because it was probably the ultimate development of the 916, the most beautiful bike ever conceived, and because it was engineering and art joined together in near perfection. but my goodness it was agony to ride any distance. There's a space on my wall for it still
  13. 9 points
  14. 9 points
    Well lazza being all lanky and smug like . I’m 4’11 and 6ft wide so I have to turn my socks down or they come over my waistband.:0)
  15. 9 points
    Love it! Planning your next bike before you have even picked your new one up! Good man.
  16. 8 points
    Original Street Triple R in THE best colour.
  17. 8 points
    Hi Just changed the air filter on my Crf 250l, 1 screw to remove panel , 4 screws to take side of filter box off, pop in filter and rebuild, less than 5 minutes oh I wish the NC was like that!.
  18. 8 points
  19. 8 points
    Do you have the "check engine" light on? If yes then find out what the fault code is. Does it have oil in it? Do the brakes get unusually hot? Can you push the bike easily in neutral (brakes not binding)? Check the voltage at the battery when the engine is running, the battery might be good but if the volts go low when running it can upset things. You should see in the region of 14V running. Check the airbox for foreign objects or blockages. The spout, filter etc. It is not unknown for rags or mouse nests to find their way in there. Check the exhaust tailpipe doesn't have something stuffed in it, kids can have a strange sense of humour sometimes. Check the throttle is actually opening, not the twistgrip but the actual throttle cable cam on the side of the throttle body. Do a basic compression test. I'm assuming it's a manual. Put it in gear (1st or 2nd) and either try pushing it or if you have a centrestand do it on that and turn the rear wheel by hand. If you feel definite separate compressions then all is not lost. The tips above regarding fuel are right. Have you recently filled up somewhere unusual? Did it start to play up shortly after refuelling? Does it perform OK when cold or is it bad at all times? If in any doubt get the old stuff out and add some good fresh fuel from a busy station (turnover of fuel), and if you use a can make absolutely sure it is clean before getting the fuel. I had to sort out a neighbour's mower 3 times before I eventually looked in the fuel can he was using to find about 1" of water in the bottom. There are more intrusive things which could be checked of course, valve clearances for example.
  20. 8 points
    Well this year will be the last year the RS takes us anywhere for a while. We were considering going out to the East Coast to Cape Breton and tour the Cabot Trail. I hadn’t been out there since 84’ on the 650 Kawasaki and my wife had not been since she was a teenager with her family. Then we got a request from one of my oldest friends to celebrate their daughters wedding in Tennessee. It turned out it was the wiser choice, as there are few BMW dealers in Nova Scotia, maybe none, really. The initial trip to Knoxville was going to take two and half days, bypassing most large highways going south from Buffalo. We got on some amazing roads and through some depressing coal towns, but still friendly as long as you didn’t linger. We decided that since we were down this way, and that neither one of us had been to Nashville, we headed off. It was a meandering day ride, about six hours. We had the trailer with us, so we could camp in the tent if we wanted so we reserved two days at the Nashville KOA. It was close to downtown (surprisingly) with a hourly shuttle. Best of all, for $30 more you could leave the tent in the trailer and rent a air conditioned cabin. The temperature when we were there never went under 85°F and was tipping 100 during the day. We opted for the cabin. We really enjoyed Nashville, we walked through the tourist area, took public transit out to the edge of the city and back. Walked all over the place. Even went to the Grand Ole Opry. It ended up being the best place around to get stranded. Three days later we left for Memphis, the next city we had both never visited. I decided we would travel southwest from Nashville and go along the Nachez Trace Parkway, then head due west into Memphis. Two hours later those plans were null. I felt something change in the motor as we crested a hill and the bike sounded louder. I pulled into a parking area quickly and directed the bike, facing out so it could be put on a flatbed. They towed the bike and trailer to Bloodworth BMW in Nashville. We stayed at a motel across the street and they did what they could with what they had, but parts had to be ordered and we needed to be gone by Sunday. We left the bike there and flew home with a box that the dealer gave us to throw what needed to come home, came back with us. Everything else stayed there until I flew back in October when the bike was finally fixed. Oh well I have an NC750X! I took two days to get back and then we decided it was time for something newer. Just another adventure…
  21. 8 points
    What's this - Jessie's Fashion Tips now is it? . So conversely, I'm 5'6" but with a 29" inseam I feel all in-proportion with myself today - yay Another bit of better news, the doctor thinks the counsellor has it completely wrong and that my memory issues are more a symptom of the depression I'm struggling with. To make sure, she wants to see me and Kels together on Thursday so she can do some memory tests and ask Kelly how I am at home. She is also going to refer me for a neurology appointment which she admits is a bit extreme but that's because the "memory clinic" for dementia isn't available for someone so young (thanks for that Doc ). Though think that particular policy is a bit awry. Signed off for another month due to my safety-critical role. She has also ruled out any appropriate medication until the results of my tests/checks so as not to distort any results. Thanks all, for your support, it's been most welcome. It's a difficult thing to talk about despite the very positive media coverage of late which tries very hard to dispel the stigma. Still no DL650 G
  22. 8 points
    Been there Tony. Seem a decent bunch of guys, not the usual BMW lizard types. They did a free BBQ at weekends over the summer and I went down with a chap who wanted to test a few bikes - he fell in love with an RT but dunno how he got on. Not heard or seen him for a while. Actually that would be a good place for a forum meet up next year, great fun if we could get Andy M in to see if he spontaneously combusts in the presence of a BMW......
  23. 8 points
    After my counsellor session I went straight to the Greyhound (only a few doors away) and treated myself to one of these. Jam Donut Pale Ale. Shouldn't work but it does. It was just what I needed too.
  24. 8 points
    Yup, sounds like a bargain. Sadly too tall for me - but I realise by it's very nature this particular genre of bike always will be in order to have the necessary amount of suspension travel to be considered a serious contender rather than a dressed up "scrambler" which only looks the part.
  25. 8 points
    Yeah, no good for going places Of just getting out for a laugh Or special occasions Or.... Andy
  26. 7 points
    The CB500 is now at 12000 miles and will be two years old in May. Purely on the basis there are weeks due when riding will not be nice I've started the ball rolling to refresh everything that's likely to wear out over the summer. On the basis I might swap it at three years old and figuring aftermarket stuff lasts longer than OE, this will hopefully be the only major work until then. I have ordered Tyres: 1 pair of PR-4's, the current pair with 8000 on (the OE Dunlop were awful) have enough tread for a few runs until the snow arrives but are squared off. Chain: The original has needed adjusting twice in the last 2000 miles which suggests it is not the best. Air filter and plugs: The main reason I' ll post pictures, getting down to the valve shims puts you within fingertip reack of the drain plug, coming in from the top, so no way am I going back in later. DOT 4 and a new bleed pump. Fluid will be changed by the slow but safe method. Pictures to follow when I get going. Andy
  27. 7 points
    Such a pretty bike with huge character. Sometimes too much character through bumpy bends at over 160km/h.
  28. 7 points
    Well said, Martin. I have been watching some of those ‘Biker incidents’ videos on YouTube (yes, I do need to ‘get a life’ and certainly need to ‘get out more’ but I have my reasons). I have been perplexed by the use of the ‘rev bomb’ by these twerps. Typical scenario - rider going too fast for conditions, car begins to encroach on riders trajectory, rider lifts the clutch and revs his engine to the limiter, car continues it’s path and rider now finds himself in trouble because he’s wasted valuable reaction time making himself look an even bigger tw@t. The vast majority of these incidents would easily be avoided by a little restraint, forward observation, planning and an acknowledgment that the streets are not their exclusive playground. As I type this the BBC are showing go pro footage of some absolutely shocking riding filmed by three riders on the A21. All three have gone to prison (and quite right too!). I still love a bit of speed - but I choose my time and place carefully.
  29. 7 points
    Gaz, how about one of these? I think they’re the titz. https://www.jsgedge.co.uk/pages/used/used-bikes/2018-UO-HONDA-CB300R-300cc/5d9f1351119a0cf37.htm Edit:
  30. 7 points
  31. 7 points
    A friend sent me this video because I do big(ish) miles on my bikes. But this is amazing - a CBR600 with over 200k - and a track day at 223k! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZUTfpw8NUM&feature=youtu.be
  32. 7 points
  33. 7 points
    I thought I'd done stuff over the years - but reading this lot above it appears I've led a rather sheltered life Also. I'm feeling a bit better
  34. 7 points
    I'll tell you what causes a lot of confusion: we've ended up using the word "depression" for two quite different things: an emotion, and a mental illness. Everybody on the planet will experience depression-the-emotion at various times in their life. It's the natural reaction to things going wrong, emotional hurt, loss, poverty, injustice, etc. Unfortunately, lots of people think this is the same thing as depression-the-illness. I've met many, many well-intentioned people talking about their depression and how they overcame it by various lifestyle changes, or by altering the way they perceive things. They think they can relate to others with the same thing and help them - a laudable aim. I think there is something in it - depression-the-emotion can be helped by other people and it's good that they try. Psychological support and coaching can help change your emotional response to an unpleasant situation so you no longer feel depressed. However, depression-the-emotion is very different from depression-the-disease, and this can be a curse if you suffer from the disease because no amount of well-intentioned coaching, assistance or "positive thinking" can help much, and sometimes your caring friends and family can become frustrated at your lack of engagement with it, or the lack of results. Indeed, there are plenty of people who take the harder view: that a sufferer should "Snap out of it - I did it, so can you!" In reality they snapped out of the emotion. Nobody can snap out of the disease, any more than they can snap out of cancer or diabetes. Calling the disease "depression" has led to an enormous lack of understanding of its true nature. I try to differentiate by using the term "clinical depression", but it hasn't really taken hold. Anyway, that's it - this is my rant about whoever decided to use the same word for the disease and the emotion. Thanks for letting me use up this space with a personal beef!
  35. 7 points
    My business partner brought me a fake Tag Heuer back from the Far East. It looked the part, worked OK except for a sticky rotating bezel. Anyway a couple of years later I was stood at the bar in the pub and this guy came over and said 'Excuse me, I can't help noticing you've got a Tag Heuer - Tell me, have you had any problems with yours, 'cos mine is constantly going wrong and every time I take it in Tag want £500 to fix it' 'No I said I must have been lucky and got one of the good ones off the production line' (True story) Mike
  36. 7 points
    Blow up doll autopilot:0)
  37. 6 points
    https://www.flickr.com/gp/153918776@N06/n8uJT8
  38. 6 points
    Hi all, thanks for all your input on the enfield, I was lucky enough to find a very low mileage bonneville T100 2014 MY and it was 20% cheaper than the enfield twin, the seller was very kind to let me ride it for an hour or so in my local area, I found it to be very similar to the enfield but the extra 20 or so HP was very evident. that said so was the extra 20kg of weight, so my garage homes a ducati 749s, the NCx and now a t100, may need a bigger shed or kick the GTI out and get a few more bikes. Again thanks to all who put the time in to reply
  39. 6 points
  40. 6 points
    I think you're looking back through rose tinted glasses. I'm afraid the reality was that if it didn't have one it still broke down and far more regularly. I started driving in 1974 and I still remember that seeing cars and bikes broken down at the side of the road on a depressingly regular basis. Today that is something of a rarity. In fact it has become such a rare occurrence that many of the hard shoulders on our motorways that were completely free of broken down vehicles have been turned into a fourth lane. As for the motoring journo I have to wonder what he was well known for? I had a 2000 Merc SL AMG and kept it for 15 years, non of my previous vehicles were as reliable. During the entire 15 years of ownership it never once broke down and the only cost of ownership was replacing consumable parts. On one occasion I couldn't get the transmission out of Park into Drive, however, there was a manual override switch you could press with a screwdriver or pencil. That was simply a failed micro switch that cost under £5 to replace. I'm currently driving round in 10 year old Fiat that has never let me down. I've had a few minor issues that was solved with a cheap ODBII reader off fleabay and some free software for my laptop to tell me which sensor was playing up, and it was always a sensor and nothing mechanical. So far......... I also had a BMW R1100RS, it was a 1994 ex demo bike. I put 185,000 miles on it in 5 years and that broke down only once. One morning I started it and it would tick over but not rev. I phoned BMW and they knew straight away what the problem was. It was a 90p reed relay that cut the fuel supply in case of an accident that had failed. They told me which wires to short to bypass it and posted me one free of charge. You think the modern world has gone tech mad but is that a bad thing? One of the reasons is that the mechanical parts are better made with better tolerances and have become generally more reliable and one of the things that helps keep them reliable is the plethora of electronic sensors that continuously monitor them. They can then shut things down to prevent possibly catastrophic and expensive failures. Yes, you have an additional step to check the sensor isn't faulty but that's far better than having to take the engine apart looking for some undefined problem or to replace a lot mangled parts. Anyone that has have ever watched programs like Wheeler Dealers will attest to the fact that often potentially expensive problems have turned out to be a relatively cheap electronic sensor or wiring fault that were fixed for a few quid. There's also a reason your GP spends more time looking at his computer. They don't have X-ray vision and they usually can't see what's wrong with you. You could go back to the time when you reeled off a list of what you felt were symptoms and they gave you drugs based on that and told you to come back in a two weeks if you didn't improve at which time they'd try something else and hope, emphasis on hope, that would work. These days they take samples and get them tested and the results, via the computer, tell them exactly what's wrong, they then know what to give you to fix it. Yes there will always be examples of modern cars failing for all sorts of reasons but in the main they are much more reliable than older cars. Cars and bikes have moved on mechanically and electronically and you have a choice. You can update your skills and tools to cope or you can pay someone else or, as you suggest, buy an old car/bike that matches your current skill set.
  41. 6 points
    The C90's front brake's only points are to provide somewhere convenient to attach the spokes and to act as a bowel loosener for the pilot
  42. 6 points
    I don't know Simon, it's not that far round a Ducati...........
  43. 6 points
    Yep, my C90's pipe is entirely bolt on 😇😉 Smug rook to pedants knight 4 Your move.......
  44. 6 points
    Here's some more support - only worn once.
  45. 6 points
    Well said, Mike. Very well said, indeed!
  46. 6 points
    Have never been able to find long bodied shirts, so ones that won't stay tucked in I just wear untucked. Wearing shirts loose helps disguise the surplus pounds around the waist anyway!
  47. 6 points
    My wife and I, and most of our friends have exactly the same issues with trying to remember names and sometimes words. I don't think we can all be heading towards dementia so I prefer to believe that this is just part of the aging process. Personally I've always been hopeless at remembering names anyway, but good with telephone numbers and other numeric information. For example I can still remember the wi-fi router password from the apartment in Sitges we rented from our friend a few weeks age. (I logged into it to change the wi-fi channel to something different to all the other apartments in the block as they all seemed to have defaulted to the same channel, so potentially interfering with each other.) PS: benefit of reaching 65 a few weeks ago - cheaper tickets to Motocycle Live - only £12 for oldies like me.
  48. 6 points
    Reading these intriguing posts regarding persuading the other half to allow a change of bike or using subterfuge to get away with it makes me realise how lucky I am that Sue shares my passion and understands the pleasure of getting a new bike..
  49. 6 points
    Clearly worth every penny...……………….. just. I suspect we've all been there, done that, got the T-shirt …………………. which shrank in the wash and is full of holes.
  50. 6 points
    Well holy freaking cow. The DCT reset sorted it. Bike is now smoother than a cashmere codpiece.
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