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  1. Tex

    Tex

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  2. Andy m

    Andy m

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  3. Rocker66

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Showing most liked content since 30/04/20 in all areas

  1. 16 points
    How cool is this! You know you want one Rocker
  2. 13 points
    After having four Ncx Honda's over the last eight years I thought that I would try something else. Had the Tracer 700 dropped of today and said good by to the NC750x. I have only managed 130 miles on it but that was enough to let me know that the seat is to hard for me. The bike is so much punchier than the Honda and the breaks are also better, plus it feels lots lighter. Already missing the trunk though. After fitting some extras that I had already bought, tomorrow I will be out for the day and I am hoping to put another 200-300 miles on it which should let me know if I need to order a comfort seat.
  3. 13 points
    With apologies to Don Maclean... Along long time ago I can still remember how that single used to make me smile I knew that if I had a chance I could make that CB dance And maybe I'd be happy for a while But lockdown made me start to quiver And when would Sainsbury's deliver Bad news on the doorstep We could even take a step I can't remember if I sighed As I looked at my dear bike outside Something touched me deep inside The way that CB flys So No going to the pub for a pie Rode my CB to the Derwent But the Derwent was dry The good old boys were drinking Cider that's dry Singing this'll be the day that you'll fly This'll be the day that you'll fly Did you write Keith's Code of bends And do you have faith in Michelin's blends If the Roadcraft tell's you so? Do you believe in rock and roll Can biking save your mortal soul And can you teach me how to dance and flow Well we know that your in love with her 'Cause we saw you flying over there (yeah I know😎) You both kicked back and start to cruise Man we dig that CB's Tunes Just a happy middle-aged broncin' buck With red CB and a lot of luck Today, no need to give a *##* Today, day that CB flys
  4. 11 points
    Corrected for you. Its a Ural. Made out of special cheese and toffee like materials by people who drink vodka in pint glasses so that no one ever makes it to the Polish border ever again. This is the best all round outfit I had [/url] The BMW R1100R-Meteor was better looking and faster (110 mph +) but the handling was flawed. The Watsonian scooter outfit Griff posted is a reduced scale Meteor. The shape is allegedly based on a DeHavilland Mosquito drop tank. You meet lots of people with a dog in a sidecar. You need to drive one before you buy, they are a completely different vehicle, nothing to do with bikes. The closest is a quad bike. The scooter and monkey bike outfits worry me slightly as one or two point fitting is not strong enough. For a bit of fun a few miles from home maybe they survive, but if the adjustment goes out it will ruin your day. For a light outfit I'd go Jawa-Velorex or start with an SR500 or one of its clones. Andy
  5. 10 points
    Now it's got just over 800 miles on it, the Cub is really settling in well. Finally managed to get a run in. Next task is to get one of those clip on Jerry Cans. Now a bit of advice would be welcome if you've used them. Would you get the Rotapax ones (very expensive) or would you get the ones that look similar that Itchy Boots uses that are a third the price? Have I just answered my own question?😁 Meanwhile, somewhere in Devon, yesterday.......
  6. 9 points
    Great photo Brian. Up to 186 miles now. Going well. Filled up at Tesco yesterday £2.36!!!!!!!!! I have a Sigg fuel bottle and was wondering how I could safely carry it. Still pondering.
  7. 9 points
    To be completely honest now, it's absolutely fine for what we need. If I start to go down the road I've been down before so many times before, I know it's fraught with stress, cost and ultimately disappointment. At this point in our lives, having a bike that can do huge mileages, touring etc. It'll end up not being used for anything which the little CB can do anyway. When we retire, we'll reappraise the situation but for now it's perfect. Plus, it has a surprising degree of character that both our previous NC's didn't have. The CB is light, flickable, fast enough and hugely entertaining. With Kels on the back none of this changes to any degree. She's such a, good pillion that the dynamics are hardly changed. AND, I've become rather attached to the little CB300R 👍👌
  8. 9 points
    A bit late as I've had the XS650 now for about ten months but I was a little busy with selling my business then toddling off to NZ for much of that so have only just started to think again about what needs doing to it. This is what was fitted today: The front brake was ridiculously poor, I give it a 1 out 5 as it does just about slow the bike down if a full four finger death grip is used but even then there is zero chance of locking the wheel no matter how slow you're going, even on gravel it only just locks at walking speed! Fortunately the rear drum is powerful and has good feel so the combo was just about usable. It still had the original rubber hoses so I've gone for a new pair of the same from Yambits and fitted them today along with new pads (aren't they dinky? ) and bled a whole bottle of new fluid through. A quick scoot shows the brake is noticeably better as more of the Death grip force is now used trying to press the pads against the disc rather bulge the brake pipes. However the lever feel is now quite soft so I hope a combo of pads bedding in and me finding some air in the system with a marathon bleeding session will see the XS with a 2 out of 5 front brake soon. The headlight was also the original, made in Japan, 45/45W sealed beam unit, a bit dim but still working after 48 years, won't be much made today that will still be doing the same in 2058. Yambits do a straight replacement 60/55 which has the added bonus of being left side dip rather than the 'made for US' right side dip' of the original. I had a spare Philips Nightbreaker that went in and headlight is now up to about late 90's spec, 3 out of 5 I reckon Hopefully the alternator and brand new Motobatt battery will handle the extra 15W! I also stripped the front forks as they were pretty soft with lots of static sag. The oil was a weird grey colour so possibly original, or at least not been changed for decades, but the springs were bang on max length backing up my thoughts that the 4800 miles may be original. I thoroughly cleaned the fork internals and reassembled with slightly heavier oil and 5mm of spacers on top of the fork springs to slightly firm up the front end. It now sits a few mm higher and noticeably more damping but I'll reserve judgement until I've out a few miles on it. Fortunately changing oil grade is easy if I want to fine tune as the forks have a drain plug and top plugs can be easily removed in situ. I'm waiting for a new original pattern seat cover to arrive as the existing one is super smooth and shiny (and looks awful) so even the feeble brakes have me sliding tank-ward at every stop . When I do fit it I'm going to try and augment the foam with some options I have in the workshop as the original is a bit soft and slightly forward sloping so a bit more density and reversing the slope should help comfort. Fingers crossed this cover arrives this week. I've also got a fuel tap repair set to fit as the right one leaks when you turn it, it's okay once you've finished turning it but it will only get worse and petrol on the gloves is never a good thing. I'll put some miles on it once these mods are finished to bed them in and see what the overall effect is, I'm hoping it will make a nice bike a bit nicer .... and safer. Next up might have to be a twin disc conversion (as the European bikes had) and some expensive shocks to make it more comfortable two up but the aftermarket ones on there are brand new and look the part even if a little harsh so I'm hoping the seat mods will make enough difference for now.
  9. 9 points
    Mine might only be 30 years old but it is the one bike I will never let go of.
  10. 8 points
    Until the borders open again at least there’s YouTube. Never been to the Alps, really should..
  11. 8 points
    The Triumph dealers in St Leonards re-open on Monday. 01424-423520. Let me know and I can either meet you there or, at the very least, make an introduction over the phone. Mention my name and they’ll charge you double and frisk you when you leave.. 🙄
  12. 8 points
    In fact the cobblers is a symptom of the current problem in the bike market. During the boom in the eighties and nineties, the big four created the myth, using the (very) compliant and complicit bike press that we needed bigger and bigger bikes. That myth perpetuates to this day, because the juggernaut won't steer off the course because they managed to entrench that myth in our riding culture. This has turned off the youth and in any case they were still selling to most of us who were around then so they didn't have to try too hard. That and increasing government pressure to get bikes off the road means they shot the golden goose. Now it needs a concerted effort to market biking and the fun to be had and the money you can save if you don't buy into the myth. It will need some left field thinking to get people engaged. The other issue is our safety culture where all of us have to be protected to the Nth degree and the general belief that motorcycles are dangerous. Many people die and are injured cycling, climbing mountains and in the home, they seem to fret less about that. Unless something changes, we've had the best of it, yet we perpetuated the worst of it. When we were young, bikes used to be small, light and fun. Now, like many of us, they've become big, heavy and serious. They need to be small, light and fun again, and they need to focus and sell to the generations coming up and worry less about our generation if they are to survive, at least in our market. Rant ends😁
  13. 8 points
    My success rate with women was such that I gave them up for real ale. Finally got captured by wife one after many attempts on her part. She thought I was playing hard to get but I was actually just inebriated most of the time.
  14. 8 points
    I forgot to post in here some time ago, though I know I did put it up. SHAD UK gave me three different answers. Yes it will fit, no it wont, yes it will but the tank shape has changed and it won't look perfect. In the end I got it and it fits pretty much exactly like the original. The passenger seat was a bit of a sod to fit and the little pull out rubber supports on it where a nightmare but got there in the end. It doesn't feel hugely different just sat on it but the fatigue after a food 100 mile ride is considerably reduced - says to me its doing its job.
  15. 8 points
    One step ahead ... I’ve basically spent lock-down doing this up and it’s now ready for an MoT.
  16. 8 points
    So the progress so far. I'm most of the way through the mower part, some of the engine bits have arrived. over the last four or five days I have been turning bits that looked. Like this into reasonable material again; And gradually refurbishing these bits with a bit of paint and some stickers. The cutting cylinder was as bad as that bar above and actually cleaned up pretty well. Trying to use only hand tools, mainly because the one thing I'm not short of is time right now Heres some I finished earlier More to come😁
  17. 8 points
    hello all just a small note for all of you that fit your own tyres. i have been doing it for years but but it does not come up very often that the reason for the little yellow dot on your tyre is a reference point to line up with your valve.it indicates the lightest point of the tyre hence you put it next to the heaviest point of the wheel ,where the valve is. i hope this is help to all diyers. ride safe
  18. 8 points
    Morning Ciaran! Did you sleep well? Dream of a new bike?
  19. 8 points
    The image thing is for the weekend crowd. Two words for the ones who can't understand the fun - Maria Costello. Gooner in his youth (now pushing 14 and happily decrepit, currently looking out of the window and trying to remember why he got out of his bed to do this) had two interests, balls and food. A secondary interest was people as they may have a ball or food. When the picture was taken the Old Girl was trying to get him to face the camera with a squeaky ball. Dogs in sidecars need harnesses and training. Gooner for example logically assumed stopping and arriving were the same. Having him get out at traffic lights was not a good idea. The noise is also frightening. You need to sit them in the chair stationary, then go on short trips to places they like. You need water and doggles because a fly in the eye can lead to infections. Gooner practicing wearing goggles/doggles Andy
  20. 7 points
    A bit of a bimble on the CL confirmed what I'd already guessed It's not uncommon on these 350 Hondas and once you've found the sweet spot on the carbs and timing you can feel what's going on. While it'll sit at 70+ down hill, once you really work it the seal goes. At least the diagnosis is easy and the 30 mpg it gets on some runs isn't just down to me eating too many pies and thrashing it! So, the 350 will be on very local duties until August when the insurance runs out and the head will be coming off over the winter. Can anyone recommend a garage heater? I think electric even though I'd plan to turn it on the night before I planned to do some work. Cheers Andy
  21. 7 points
    In the spirit of finding myself something to do, the. Last week I've started on a restoration that I should have done years ago. I dug the offending article out from under one of our trees where it's been a garden sculpture for the last three years. Sadly I've no pictures of the item as a whole, you can guess how it looked from the bits I've not started yet. I include a few pictures below of progress over the last 10 days. I reckon it will take me about 4 to 5 weeks. Its a 1962 Suffolk Colt lawnmower that my father bought when him and mum bought their first house. I still have the original manual and bill of sale. It was too heavy for our steep lawns in Devon so we used it as a "sculpture"😂 In the garden. It was looking a bit sad so I thought I'd restore it to running condition. I was amazed when it came apart so easily and how well it had fared considering. It'll need a new set of bearings though (ordered) and I'll save the engine until last, but it spins freely and smoothly, so fingers crossed....... As stripped.....😂 Some bits we saved earlier......
  22. 7 points
    Reminds me. I remember on the Briskoda forum I was having a little fun with car names inspired by the Yeti: Nissan Kumquat Landrover Freeloader etc etc. I got a right good telling off by someone who thought it inappropriate (doubtful) and childish (definitely) - but that's me 😁
  23. 7 points
    It was attached to a 1935 Velocette 500 MSS and was a two seater. However I had removed the seats as I had brought up all my belongings to college (Dundee). With my best pal and his rather large brother we decided to go to the pictures so one was facing forward and the other backwards leaning on each other. We were going down a narrow (cobbled!) road with cars parked on both sides and a car was coming towards us but it didn't give way when he had the opportunity. I realised we were going to have a 'head-on' if I didn't take avoiding action. I saw a small space on the left and hauled the handlebars first one way then the other way applying my brakes as hard as I could. The rear wheel went skywards and the aluminium nose of the sidecar ground along the cobbles. The rear passenger saw the sky while the front passenger found himself paddling furiously on the cobbles. The car continued and smashed into the wall at the end of the road. The driver had died at the wheel! Naturally I had to take it off the chassis but I was only insured for a sidecar so I strapped a plank of wood along it and tied a 56lb weight to it hoping it would help keep the sidecar wheel on the ground. I had another pal (I had some!) on the pillion going along the Kingsway dual carriageway with a very large grass central reservation. Unfortunately.... the plank started to oscillate, then broke. At this moment I had to take to the reservation as the third wheel was rising to an alarming height. Once again I slammed on the brakes and we ploughed a furrow as the bike frame dug into the grass as my passenger 'climbed' over me as I tested by ability to reproduce on the tank and petrol filler looking at the ground over my headlight (I managed 20 offspring...) Meanwhile....... The 56lb weight was continuing along the road with sparks flying and to my horror it looked as if it was going to hit a slow car in front. Fortunately the camber took it back on to the centre reservation. Oh and my passenger was Bela Hatvany - look him up on Google. Full marks for anybody has got this far..... Have I told you about......
  24. 7 points
    Due to extreme levels of boredom and cabin fever I resorted to delving back in to the murky world of chain maintenance. Most of it is supposition, superstition, claimed 'facts' without evidence, religious lube fanatics and the downright weird. Having enjoyed Youtube videos and websites of all types both amateur and professional a few interesting nuggets come out of it. It breaks down to. 1. Don't bother, doesn't need cleaning/lubing 2. Smother it in tacky gloop 3. Smother it in non tacky gloop 4. Use gear oil (often recommended by chain manufacturers and bike brands) 5. Use a Scottoiler or similar of your choice 6. Use one of umpteen snake oils Cleaning is pretty much a mix of Kerosene, expensive dedicated chain cleaner, WD-40. So what I determined after this barrage of infobesity is that tacky is bad, avoid tacky. Tacky makes grinding paste. Use an oiler if thats your thing. Wax lubes work ok until it rains. Then there is the technical approach where you think about what lube actually does. Mostly on the outside its just corrosion resistance, also a bit of help for the rollers. The main action takes place inside the O ring boundary so don't try and affect that. Some say any lube is a waste of time as the pressure of the rollers squeeze it out anyway and thats not the main wear area. What I am going to try, and feel free to wade in and call me a heretic is to clean it with either some of the Kerosene I have, or just WD-40. WD-40 is mostly Kerosene or Naptha anyway with some Alkanes and a light mineral oil with a bit of Vaseline. So its mostly a cleaner with a mild lubricant quality. Not much of one but ok for protecting the outside of your chain a bit and does zero damage to O rings as proven by actual tests on o rings over extended periods in solution. There you go, cheap chain cleaner with 'some' lubricant qualities. The part wanting a little more help is the rollers as they aren't sealed. I could brush on some gear oil but buried in all the nonsense is some tests of PTFE spray lubes that mostly dry completely. Not GT85 which has only enough PTFE in so they can write it on the can, I mean a dedicated PTFE product, about £3 from some outlets or if you can't wait a fiver for WD-40 PTFE dry lube (recommended for chains). Decent squirt of that along the rollers, let it all dry and I am done. Hoping for a dry running chain that is actually lubricated 'enough' and easy to clean without much effort by a blast of spray and a wipe. Bring it on, do your worst
  25. 6 points
    ... well, beach car park actually. Don't see many of these around. Had a brief chat with the owner, asked about maintenance and he said that sadly Haynes haven't got around to producing a manual yet and Morgan themselves never documented the engine build. Definitely a case of DIY then. Lovely 'old car' leathery, oily smell to it too
  26. 6 points
    You could to say something like “You do not have to say anything. Anything you do say will be reported back to a bunch of pedants and, almost certainly, will be used against you. It may harm your defence if you are talking total bollox if you do not mention this now.” Then everyone knows exactly where they stand!
  27. 6 points
    I think someone misunderstood the brief when they specified it should be capable of being off road for large proportion of the time.
  28. 6 points
    Repro wiring harness went in no problem and we have electricity! Other bits done include, new front brake caliper, lines and master cylinder all bled out and working, new indicators, the front mounts are always bent after even a small drop because they stick out 4 feet either side of the bike so used these fork brackets. LED warning bulbs. Brakes Indicators.
  29. 6 points
    Tall and thin and light and lovely The bike from Kawasaki goes riding But when it passes, each one it passes goes "Ahh"
  30. 6 points
    I've finally managed to get my hands on it. Spray down with disinfectant either side as I was borrowing 'rents pressure washer to clean my car (that's become rather expensive, bloody birds). I digress! First impression when you step on is how roomy it is. I think people considerably taller and wider than I would feel right at home on it but I didn't feel "outsized" by it like I do most adventure bikes. The seat is lovely and squishy though I do wonder whether that might not necessarily be a good thing for very long rides - still felt supple to sit on for a short test ride. When you start it there's a very gentle little burble, nothing thunderous or dense it's just a nice thump. Gearbox feels lovely and positive with a light, forgiving clutch. Clicks into first far more smoothly than my NC does for a start! What do I do? Stall it immediately. And then stall it again. You need to give it some beans to get it underway, more so than I am used to at any rate. Pulling off the line is nice and linear though and the engine feels fairly sprightly for something so small, certainly enough for every day pootling around riding and them some. It responds well to my preferred short shifting though I think more beans would get more go so to speak. It keeps up nicely with the flow of traffic up to 50mph. It remains remarkably stable at those speeds, feels rather unfussed by anything. Suspension is nice and comfortable too, ride quality is certainly nicer than the NC is. Not too bouncy but more forgiving, There are a couple of negatives. The well publicised brake issues were present - it's the first bike I've ridden where he back brake feels sharper than the front. It works of course just requires a fairly hefty pull on the lever and since it's the exact opposite in sharpness terms of my NC I was confused somewhat. Overtaking would require some planning and going much above the 50mph mark I don't think overtakes would be a safe venture without an extra lane (like a dual carriageway etc). Lastly the tyres didn't suit me - the sort of semi-nobblies meant I felt a definite 'step' when I tipped into a certain lean angle. It's something you'd get used to but it felt quite alien to me. Overall an awful lot of bike for the money. I never once felt out of my depth on the countryside bimbles and actually not having the power to overtake things seemingly at will meant I felt more "at ease" with the gentle country life. It's nice to ride an adventure bike made for shorties and it doesn't really force any compromises anywhere - just the usual retraining to become used to a bike as we all have to do when we buy one.
  31. 6 points
    I just found this while scrolling through some You tube offerings....maybe some of you folks on here have experience of these bikes....I'd love a ride on them...enjoy.
  32. 6 points
    Oooh! I love a lawnmower build thread! Well, OK, I admit this is my first - but I can tell I am going to love it!
  33. 6 points
    I remember those days! The deckchairs, not the MZs. Bare floors with just the odd rug. Clattering up and down stairs with no stair carpet, the whole bit. But it was ours. And we had our love to keep us warm when we couldn’t afford the heating.. Luckily I was working in the bike shop when I got married so my commuter was anything that had a bit of tax on it. I knew when the boss was pleased with me, I got the CBX six cylinder. When he was just ‘so, so’ it would be a 400-500cc something-or-other. And when I had pissed him off he would try and find a shitty old Lambretta! I certainly wasn’t a scooter fan in those days, I tell you that. One that was surprisingly enjoyable was a, well thrashed, CB200 in green. Lots of fun. Equally surprising (and even more fun) was the CB400 automatic. Pulling away from a traffic light whilst ostentatiously fiddling with my goggles was a favourite pastime. My ‘own’ bike was an early LeMans, but when the draughty windows became a problem it had to go. Replacement was a CX500A and a house full of double glazing. I soon learned to love the CX (if not the DG) .
  34. 6 points
    I rode my first bike into skip. 1979 CB100N in vile brown. The previous owner had for some unknown reason drilled into the crank case. It was flat out at 40 mph, did 45 to the gallon and had 6V electrics that had no discernable function except to blow the fuse or lamps. Rode it to Shipley to trade it for the MZ. Had to top up the oil and wipe down the crank case before going into the shop. The dealer offered me fifty quid more than I'd paid for it but I had to take it back the week after. More of a bet than a trade in. When I got there he had planks up the skip and I just rode it in. Deserved scrapping just for being a ****colour. Andy
  35. 6 points
    Not sure if I mentioned it previously but Watsonian do a sidecar for a scooter. The owner a Lady living locally to me got this job done as a special. From memory the scoot is a Vespa 300 four stroke. The dogs were her primary reason for doing so. I have no doubt Watsonian would be happy to do so for any bike.
  36. 6 points
    As one who does 15,000 miles per year, and ride all year round, here's my take. - I seldom clean a chain - I avoid proprietary lubes (unless cheap at autojumbles etc) - I use engine oil (or WD40, silicone spray etc etc) In winter an oil/grease mix. - Anyone who says that O ring chains don't need lubrication has obviously never ridden in the rain. - Once water gets past the seals on an O ring chain and a link seizes it's dead. There is no way to free it….. - ….or maybe not. The above is the subject of a long-term experiment I'm running. A chain with little wear but some seized links is in my garage steeping in a oil/white spirit mixture. I'm 18 months into the experiment. No conclusions yet. - For longest life buy DID - Alan's point about sprocket wear indicating friction is very relevant. And where there is friction you need lube. - I have got 25,000 miles out of chains on my FJ1200 & SV650 and half that on my CBF250 because it's used in winter. So power doesn't kill chains - water, salt & grit does. All of the above is just my opinion and may well be rubbish.
  37. 5 points
    A halogen heater with the 3 bars, cheap to buy, cheap to run.
  38. 5 points
    As I said earlier I've been thinking about adding some fuel capacity to the Super Cub. I had dismissed the Rotapax set up, dimensionally not ideal for me, and sooooooo expensive. The Chinese alternative is much cheaper, but I have concerns about how robust the plastic mount might be. Anyway, I had a go at making a mount to fit an ordinary 5L can in my Topbox. In the end I made a bracket for a tiedown strap and made it all from bits I already had, including the 5l fuel can. That gives me another 130 to 150 miles on board basicly for free. I made sure there was no fear of chaffing, no one wants a topbox full of fuel😳. And it looks like this Even room for my tubeless puncture kit alongside.😁
  39. 5 points
    I agree with most of that...to a point, and the point is this. Instead of "blast up the motorway then start having fun" what I've done it try to make that fun start sooner and don't go near the motorway. Getting out of South Devon for most is a thrash up the A38 and join the M5 at Exeter. There are other, much quieter and more scenic options, but they're slower. I do understand that when your time is limited sometimes you just want to cover some miles. On non motorway (dual carriageways are included in that) routes, I can average between 30 and 40 on the C90 (got a gold on the 2013 national Rally on it that suggests I'm not far out) and I don't see why the Cub, with a comfortable cruising speed of 50-55mph (even though the top speed is about 58-60 indicated unless the wind or gravity is assisting) wouldn't be able to average around 40 - 45 or even a little bit more if it's clear. I've certainly done back to back 300 mile days on the C90 without too much trouble and always arrived by tea time (say 18:00) and in well under 10 hours. One of my longest trips on the C90 was leaving Diss at 09:00 and arriving home by 20:00. A distance of roughly 350 miles by the route I used with all stops included. The range on the new Super cub is a potential issue, with about 90 to 100 miles to the flashing dash and about 120 to empty (3.8 litres max). My plan to solve that will is a clip on 3 or 5 litre can that I can fill at a service station and will give me up to 250 miles of independence from them. Top up after a couple of hours or so is a bit of a faff, but just needs a mindset reset. It's the price I'm happy to pay for my style over substance choice 😁. Now Rocker's CB 125 with a near 300 mile range would be interesting. My 250 Rally knocks out between 180 to 210 miles on a tank (10 litres)
  40. 5 points
    You know what they say - if you want to go out in the bush get a Land Rover. If you want to come out again get a Toyota..
  41. 5 points
    Plenty progress this week, clocks and warning lamps finished, brakes done, indicators on and rewired with new harness, will get more pics up but here are the clocks.
  42. 5 points
    Have you and others on this forum formed a cartel to drive me to financial ruin? It's bloody working you sods.
  43. 5 points
  44. 5 points
    They are an expensive item - £100 Not the few pence of simple side stand plunger or micro switches of old, https://www.fowlersparts.co.uk/parts/6590909/nc750x-abs-dual-clutch/stand For that outlay i would first persue a good squirt of contact cleaner, followed by a few 'Wangs' Then a squirt of spray grease for the pivot - again 'Wang' to ensure even distribution... Wang - 'to move in an arc to limits, usually with varying force and expression at intermediate points of travel...' While thinking 'Yep', 'That feels a bit better', 'Ah nice' and finaly 'Mmmmm... that should do it'
  45. 5 points
    Hmmm, your pooch doesn't seem to be speaking to you. Maybe he/she can't stand these buggers who park up on the pavement? I had an inkling for an outfit at one time but watching Arthur and Olive in "On The Buses" put me off them!
  46. 5 points
    I have absolutely no use for a scooter / sidecar / trailer combo.... but I really want one! 🤪
  47. 5 points
    I started off riding two strokes and the one for which I have fondest memories is the Suzuki GT500. The GT was a development of the T500 with a disc brake & electronic ignition. I rode one from the late '70's to the mid '80's. It was pretty dated by then being a '60's design. It was crude compared to the Suzuki triples but offered decent performance at a low price and it was easy to repair & maintain. I toured Britain, Ireland & Europe on them and they never let me down.
  48. 5 points
    I use Putoline chain lube, I rate it very highly and it suits my purpose admirably. I probably have enough ‘in stock’ to see me out if not I have a 5litre can of EP80/90 left over from my AA days and an old, soft paintbrush. I like WD40 chain cleaner (but I have to pay for that, so don’t get it often) as it’s quick and easy. Paraffin (effective but messy) is my fallback method. Oooh, I get all excited thinking about chain care. Aren’t we lucky that motorcycle manufacturers realise how much we enjoy grubbing about with the filthy things. I mean, they could fit road machines with a modern, clean, silent and convenient drive system, but that would spoil it for us, eh? There’s a belt drive kit for my Bonnie for around £800. I’m not seriously considering it (I already have the GDP of a small African nation tied up in it ) but I would cheerfully have paid an extra £800 for it when new.
  49. 5 points
    For many years I used MZs for commuting. I was working for the local council in an old school building and I parked the bike in a shelter in what was playground. One evening I was heading home and the shelter was full of smokers. I thought "you like smoking? well get a load of this - ring ding ding ding".
  50. 4 points
    I owned an A10 with a double adult sidecar. Actually it was a 1950 model with a sprung rear hub so maybe not an A10? Anyway, it was very short geared so it went away from the lights like a V2 rocket - complete with cloud of smoke and often flames spurting from the carb. The linkages to the side car were a bit weary so it always wanted to wander off to the left. After a long ride you got off it looking like Richard III, all lopsided from wrestling the damn thing. It always started first prod though, hot or cold, which I thought was impressive. I still occasionally awake from dreams where the sidecar is somewhere above my head with a screaming passenger aboard. Happy days
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