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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 19/09/18 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    So, in the last 10,000 miles on the little CRF, what's happened, what went well and what's gone wrong. During the first winter, after the rear tyre was all but worn out (3500 miles), I removed both the standard tyres,and replaced them with Heidenau K60's. These are a 50/50 tyre (road/trail) and I have to say I'm very pleased with them. Good consistent grip and stability on the road, with enough bite for a bit of light trail riding. Not great in mud, something more specialised is required for that, but for Road and mountain tracks, wet or dry they are excellent for me. I am now on my second rear, the first having worn down to 2mm in the centre after 6500 miles. At just over £70 a tyre they are good value. The front is less than 1/3 worn. Mechanically, nothing has gone wrong. From slogging along trails to buzzing up the motorway at an indicated 75, (really 68) it's proved to be solid and reliable. It's not fast, but is very capable of keeping up with traffic and taking sensible overtaking opportunities. Being a small engine you re up and down the 'box a bit, but it's a pleasure to use and one of the slickest I've ever used. The engine is reasonably smooth, and definitely improved as the miles increased. It's a single so you know it's running, but for me it's not intrusive and that's after a few 450 to 500 mile days. It's best between 4000 and 8500 rpm. It will run as low as 3000, but you need a gentle throttle hand to avoid engine 'shunt'. It runs up to 10500 rpm but it's not necessary unless you want to avoid a gear change during an overtake. The first (8000 mile) service was £89:00, it's just an oil change. I have had a new front brake disc under warranty, but that might have a bit (ok a lot) to do with me whizzing round mountain twisties in France in the company of some sports bikes. The disc was blue 😉. You could argue it should be able to cope, but I put it down to self inflicted injury. Oh and the ABS is excellent and works well. In terms of consumables I've gone through two rear tyres and one front, brake pads are still fine, but I did pay extra for new fronts when the disc was changed at 8000 miles. The originals were about 1/2 worn. I've fitted a new chain and sprocket set at 9500 miles, which I'm a bit surprised at, but there's no Cush drive on the rear wheel and singles give chains a harder time of it. It will be interesting to see how long the top quality DID chain will last compared to the OEM one. Over the period it's averaged between 85 to 90 mpg. I can get 190 miles out of a tank and there's still a bit over a litre left in it. Comfort wise, it's no Goldwing, but is ok for about 120 to 150 miles now I've fitted the sheepskin seat cover to it. Certainly the ergonomics are excellent for me (6'1" 84kg 34" inside leg), but the seat is an inch taller than that on an Africa twin, so it's not for everyone. The suspension is soft but well damped and it just glides over road imperfections and speed bumps. Ideal for the state of our current roads. It's no KTM though and responds best to gentle riding off road and can get in a bit of a knot if you try belting along. The fairing and screen are also very effective, and mine's been improved further by the addition of an adjustable air blade at the top. Overall, an excellent lightweight bike that has served me well over long distances (2800 miles over 17 days in France), can carry all my kit easily for camping weekends and hotelling (is that a word🤔) over longer periods. I have a simple rack on the back from Honda Thailand and a tank bag system I made myself. Finally, the quality of finish seems very good, and is holding up well, despite what I've thrown at it and occasionally thrown it at on a trail😳. (There're are two sorts of trail riders, those that have fallen down, and those that are about to😁). And you can pick it up easily. A good, solid, old school traillie, that can tour, scratch, nip to the shops and bounce along off road fairly well while revealing it's and the riders limited abilities.😂 And it's very cheap to run, I'm still enjoying it.
  2. 13 points
    After a number of delivery extensions from ordering, I take delivery of my baby BMW next week. F850GS Sport. The last few weeks have been productive. I sold both my VFR1200F DCT and my Tiger 800. Both for full asking price. Even the weather next week looks to be playing ball. I might book it's first service for next week when I collect it. I tried a lot of similar machines before putting my deposit down. I still wish shaft drive had been an option on the bike.
  3. 13 points
    *not a bike post alert* The temptation to post several selfies with a Leaf I’d collected after it’s fallen from trees near the office was quite high but you’ll be pleased to know I’ve not done so. Just making sure the inevitable puns are all covered off. My old man’s unfortunately been shipped off to Indonesia for some high stakes drama between the Navy and the Foreign office or something leaving my mam alone with the dogs for a while. They’ve not really been separated for any lengthy period of time since he came off the Campbeltown nearly 25 years ago so I spent some time with her over the weekend. Off for shopping trips and a lunch, she offered me the keys to her pride and joy, a 66-plate Nissan Leaf Acenta. I love all things wheeled and the gub’mint is determined that cars like the Leaf will, one day, be our inevitable future. I couldn’t turn it down could I? Stupidly I failed to take any actual pictures of it however a quick google for a Gun Metal Grey Leaf will give you an idea. Beyond the fact it has Zero Emissions plastered along the door sides and on the boot, it looks relatively...well. Normal. Yes, it has an unconventional bulbous shape rather than the very chiselled, angular thing most C segment cars go for nowadays but otherwise little betrays it’s special powertrain on the outside. It feels roughly the same size as most of the cars in it’s cars, perhaps a teeny bit longer than some, but no biggy. The inside, from looks alone, isn’t that unconventional either. Actually it all feels slightly retro. Big digital dashboards, two of them, and a centre console raised from the flush surface and covered in piano black plastic. The Fit and Finish is excellent, as you would expect from a Japanese manufacturer. There is an abundance of slightly hard scratchy plastics in places but it all feels solid. The seats are covered in this strange, artificial velour type material and you sink into them like armchairs. I once had the pleasure/displeasure of being carted around in an old Citroen CX, the leviathan cheese wedge shaped barges from the 80s, and the seats feel remarkably similar. Luxuriously comfy, very much likely. The battery pack fits somewhere along the floor space under the rear seat which inevitably leaves rear legroom compromised. I’m only 5ft 5 and I found my 29” legs folded up very high, uncomfortably so for any lengthy journey. Shoulder space is excellent; you could happily fit 3 Tolkein dwarves in there with no issues at all. For anyone in the heady 6ft regions you’re going to struggle, maiming might be your only option. Strangely the battery doesn’t compromise the boot which feels pretty sizable. Beyond having a bag to fit your charging wire in, it’s a nice deep square shape. Humongous loading lip so dogs might struggle but perhaps you could put them in the backseat while your >6ft passenger goes in the boot? Legalities aside it’s probably more comfortable for everyone involved. It’s only when you turn it on that immediately things get different. It’s keyless entry as standard which is lovely, foot on the break and push the starter button. Nothing. Well, that’s a lie. No engine noise, the car comes to life in abject mechanical silence. What it does do is produce a little jingle of some form sort of like house phones from the 90s. Rather starship like displays all kick into life with the upper dashboard having a digital speedo, eco meter, clock and external temp gauge. The lower display has your battery meter, battery temperature gauge, cruise control/limiter, mileage and diagnostic screen. Fully charged with 6,000 on the clock, this particular example read 87miles till she’s running empty. This is a MY2016 with the larger 30kWh battery. It’s important to note that this figure is built of a great many bits of information and is not necessarily accurate from the moment you pull away. The car knew that the electric fan heater is on which mullers the battery life, the car was not in “eco” mode which dampens the throttle response and so it predicts it will use more battery in normal driving. It constantly assesses your driving and electrical usage to give an accurate prediction of range and there is a great many things you can do to extend the range. For example, disabling the heater and switching on Eco mode put that almost immediately up to over 100 miles of range. The eco indicator is rather sweet as you build a little infographic “tree” as you continue to drive ecologically; it makes careful driving become a game of sorts. Actually driving it is curiously liberating. Flicking the little selector into “D” and pulling away in absolute silence is a strangely eerie feeling but you quickly get used to it. This is one seriously refined and relaxing thing to be in. It glides over almost any imperfection in the road and wind noise is almost non-existent. The only real noise is from the tyres but even then that’s a distant rumble rather than anything intrusive. In eco mode the throttle response is kinda like driving a hybrid; there’s a noticeable hesitancy under the pedal but with a decent shove it moves along pretty smartly. The advantage of electric is 100% torque at standstill so even in the supposedly eco friendly mode it happily romps away from traffic with a liberal application of your right foot. Take it out of eco mood and despite the fancy electric transmission there is enough torque to get the front’s spinning. The throttle response immediately feels more urgent, so much so it’s almost a little challenging to control when you’re stuck behind Dorris in a 20 year old Micra. It’s enormously satisfying to outdrag a 330d or some other executive car off the line as it’s bogged down by it’s transmission. Course it’ll catch up eventually but no one seems to expect a dowdy hatchback to be a silent rocket. Something to note is the savage engine breaking. It’s actually a KERS like system that recovers thermal energy under braking or throttle less rolling which it then shoves back in the battery. It’s a clever system by rather aggressive, especially when going up hill. I wonder whether the brake lights should show... Despite the range being pretty short on these things it’s remarkably capable on the motorway. Supposedly it’s only capable of 90 odd mph but there’s some left over for overtaking at 70. Certainly it feels just as quick and flexible as say a small eco-diesel until you’re above 80. At those sorts of speeds you’re going to be sapping battery at a frankly ridiculous rate so 70mph is the comfortable cruising speed. We travelled from Gosport to Southampton on the motorway and it didn’t feel out of its depth at all. It handles reasonably well too. Certainly the tires Nissan fit to it are more than a match for the components underneath them. I did have a slightly hairbrained moment hooning it onto a slip road into the outside lane where it simply understeered onto the rumble strips but that was more my own loutishness than anything. It does roll quite a lot in reasonably speedy corners but it never feels uncontrolled. Just floppy. Like a St Bernard with wheels. Around town and in car parking centres etc the power steering feels very very fluid, very light and easy to use. Parking it is a dream especially as the mid range models up have parking sensors and a reversing camera. I mirror park any car I’m not familiar with and that was easy enough. However, this does neatly segue into the key downside of Electric Car ownership; Charging it. The Leaf’s charging point, much like most of the lower end of the EV market, is mounted under the badge on the bonnet meaning you have to frontwards park if you intend to charge it with a pod while you’re oot and aboot. To my shame it’s the only element of driving in which I am utterly hopeless at. Parallel or Reverse parking, no problem. Frontwards? Rubbish. Took me about 3 attempts to get it vaguely straight confounded by the auto transmission which has quite a quick rolling function. The car has two charging connections on it; one is the Type 2 standard which appears to be pretty much ubiquitous and deals with slower and mid speed charging while the other is a CHAdeMO port for fast charging. The car comes, as standard, only with the slower speed charging lead. I think a lot of the fast charging pods have cables built in for supporting the speedy charging. Actually working out how to use the damn thing might as well require an engineering degree. Plugging it into the car is easy and it locks in place to stop someone nicking your cable which is great. The pods, however, are universally completely incomprehensible. The first we tried with Podpoint requires a little contactless card thing which was supplied with the home charger that came with the car. Could we get it to work? Could ever. No indication its actually doing anything at all until the car itself starts flashing on the dashboard to say it’s charging. Working out how to unlock the port on the pod was a nightmare and, once we got back, it took us nearly half an hour in the pouring rain to work out how to release the cable. Podpoint were then adamant that we’d paid for the charging despite it showing as a nil charge which was patently not true. After all that it’d only actually gained about 10 miles of range for the hour and a half we were there. Some shopping centres now come with entirely free charging points which West Quay does. That was much easier than the Podpoints at Whiteley. But it’s still a complete faff; with an ICE car the format and methodology behind putting the blow-up juice in is universal. I counted 3 different charging point providers when we were out and about and all of them accepted payment for the charging in different ways, none of them cross compatible. For something like a Tesla or a Renault Zoe that has theoretic ranges in excess of 200 miles on a charge its less of an issue but with the MY2016 Leaf it becomes rather prohibitive. It’s worth noting that repeated rapid charging can make the battery rather hot which will inevitably ruin the battery’s life. The pay back is cost. This car covers approximately 250 miles a month which costs around £15 in electricity or so. The car before it, a 2015 Corsa, would be spending nearly £45 in petrol to do that journey. Road tax is free, congestion charges (if applicable) don’t apply to EVs, the Itchen Bridge is free. I believe there is a consultation to even open bus lanes to EVs. While parking it and charging it is a pain, special parking reserved only for EVs is actually quite common now and usually really close to shopping centres. If you can stomach the initial outlay or, as mam did, buy a demonstrator as the residual values are appalling then as a second car it makes absolute sense. There’s a wider issue that has me hesitating as well. How ecologically friendly are they? The materials required to manufacture the batteries which have an effective life of 10 years at best are particularly unfriendly to the environment to mine and manufacture. There is an argument that EVs and Hybrids have covered so many CO2 “miles” before they even reach their recipient that the actual CO2 impact of one compared to a Ford Focus or similar is virtually the same. It also depends on the national grid which varies in its ecological friendliness from country to country. For me, any car that’ll be virtually worthless and likely at the end of its effective life after 10 years just isn’t worth it. It’s proof if there ever was proof needed that we have a long way to go before we’re ready for that. EVs have their place but until they become convenient, long range, long life prospects then they’re nothing more than a second car novelty. I think I’d rather have a thumping motorbike between my legs.
  4. 12 points
    Well, spent an hour or so looking for the "safe place" i'd stored the optimate lead........ Then, I remembered I'd loaned it to a work colleague! Spent the remainder of the morning routing the satnav power cable and arranging a location above the clocks.
  5. 11 points
    First impressions. Great fun. Lightweight. Very easy to ride and very planted at the front end. Went to golf along some country lanes strewn with damp leaf debris, gravel etc and it didn’t twitch. Perhaps I was a little gung ho but on a normal bike I would have been tip toeing along making sure the front end and the road did not part company. The two wheels up front just give you the psychological confidence advantage as I am sure most riders would just rip through the same detritus without giving it a second thought. I have always been very cautious. I was not riding the Tricity, pronounced Tri City, like a loony but it is just great fun. The motor could do with perhaps being a 300cc as it is a pretty bog standard 125cc performance. In today’s very, very strong headwinds I managed to get up to the heady speed of 58mph. However for 99% of what I will use it for it is great. Very comfortable and plenty of room. Easy to get on and off and the fact that my knees are straight in front of me means my hip is not splayed and it is going to work. Of course I miss the power of a proper bike but at least I am still riding. It is an absolute breeze in the traffic and extremely narrow. I have an on fashioned roll around vertical 3 panel garage door. None of the other bikes I have had, including the S-wing 125, would fit through the single hinged entry panel door so I always had to fully open the doors. A right pain. Remarkably the Tricity just scrapes through. Tomorrow’s forecast is terrible so I will probably have a go at fitting tracker, heated grips and tail for the smart charger. All in all it’s a nice little bike that does what it says on the tin. Photos tomorrow if I get a chance.
  6. 10 points
  7. 10 points
    We were all ready to go to the 1066 for lunch but when we opened the garage door Sue spotted a screw in her rear tyre. As it was a lovely albeit it chilli morning and we were all kitted up to go we decided to ride the 125s over to Kent M/Cs. Amongst the other bikes in the car park was this lovely bit of nostalgia which is in beautiful condition
  8. 10 points
    Fingers crossed its sorted. The ECU replacement is IMHO proof the dealer is incompetent. I meet this every day at work. The ECU is treated as a box full of demons and must therefore have been made angry by evil spirits. When replacement fails the new demons must be appeased by sacrificing many innocent parts. ECU's fail in two ways. You jump start or weld, smoke comes out of it and it's dead. Or, some internal connection goes, it looses contact with a bit its trying to read or drive and the fault code tell you exactly what it is. The failure rate on Landrover and trailer ECU's that have not met a welding set is literally one in a million, Honda will have the same. The warranty reject rate from dealers using joss sticks and fowl entrails for diagnosis is close to 100%. If you paid for the ECU tell them you disagree with the diagnosis and ask them to send it to Honda as a warranty claim. If Honda reject it, it was mis-diagnosed and they can give you your money back. Andy
  9. 10 points
    The other Saturday I got my hands on a Yamaha Tracer 900 GT for a few hours and decided to put it through its paces. Having picked the bike up from Brian Greys Powerbiking in High Wycombe, I took it down to Marlow to see my fiancée for a quick cup of tea before heading back to High Wycombe and picking up the M40 to try it out on my daily commute to Barnet which takes in both the M40 and M25. Having ridden my NC750 daily for the last 4 years I was used to the NC's more sedate approach to acceleration so when I opened the throttle on the slip road I was surprised to say the least with the acceleration of the Tracer, and I was actually glad that I hadn't changed the engine mode from standard to "responsive" as I had to quickly back off the throttle as a quick glace of the speedo showed I was going a bit on the quick side. Once I was at a more suitable cruising speed I decided to try out the cruise control which worked like a charm and is a big plus in my books as I spend a lot of time on motorways, my commute is just under 400 miles a week most of which is spent on the M40 and the M25. The only issues I found on this part of the test ride were the mirrors, which were prone to shaking at higher speeds, unlike the NC's which are rock solid at all speeds and there was also some vibration through the foot pegs and the bars which was noticeable at higher speeds and could become annoying on longer journeys. The other thing I did notice is that the fuel economy is nowhere near is a good as the NC’s and at higher speeds it emptied the tank quite quickly. On the way I decided to drop off the motorways and back through Amersham taking in some twisty bits and some pretty quick A roads and the Tracer didn’t disappoint. In town it’s easy to handle and at low revs very docile. The brakes are very good as I found out when a driver decided to pull out of his parking space with out looking first. On the twisty bits it felt at home and very surefooted with the bike going where I wanted it go without any complaint. It was easy to throw into the bends and felt safe and secure. I did try the traction control and couldn’t tell any real difference but I can imagine it coming its own in wet conditions. The only thing I hated was the quick shifter which felt very stiff and in the end I gave up on it and reverted back to using the clutch for upshifts. Yes, this is a great bike and well worth considering if you want to upgrade from the NC. I loved my time on the Tracer. Do I want one? yes, but do I need one? Then the answer is no.
  10. 9 points
    I wrote this article for the Scottish Africa Twin Group. I appreciate the routes etc are probably irrelevant for folk anywhere south of York but, hopefully the sentiment of the wittering will be appreciated by some! I am totally and unashamedly biased. As any one who knows me will testify to I love my 2016 Africa Twin. It is well used, slightly bruised and tweaked to suit me. Fits like a favourite pair of gloves and is a very comfy place to be on long and short runs. I have absolutely no intention of changing it because it does everything I want it to and I’ll hang onto it until my ageing back forces the issue! SO, I was quite surprised when the guys at Two Wheels asked if I’d like a run on the 2018 version. The deal was quite simple give it a decent run and tell us what you think .. no pressure then. Ok. So here we go. Well, it looks the same. It has some new bells and whistles on the display .. totally ignore them and select ‘Tour’. I wonder if I am the only person left to hankers after nice big analogue dials? Maybe I am a dinosaur. I guess there is no chance of going backwards on that front. Press the button an the first thing you notice is a fruitier rasp than on the older version. Nice. The riding position seems pretty much the same but it's difficult to tell as I have fiddled with mine to fit, swivelled the bars, adjusted the controls as you do. All very familiar. Off we go and onwards on my favourite test run honed over a lot of years. Down the A68, turn left at Carfraemill, through Westruther, over to Duns (coffee and cake at the garden centre cafe), back over the Lammermuirs via Longformacus, though Gifford and back to Edinburgh passing through Pencaitland. Through the traffic is feels pretty much like my ’16 model, once the road opens up a bit and the throttle is twisted the exhaust note certainly has a throatier growl. However, this is where the biggest difference immediately become apparent. It feels much smoother and responsive .. faster perhaps but most certainly far more refined. Very impressive. I never felt there was much wrong with the original but this is definitely a level up. Onwards and down the A68. Yes, it’s an engaging bike to ride and the standard tyres seem to be far better than the original Dunlops on the old model. Not that it started raining or anything but no sense of sliding, nervousness, unpredictability, traction control interruption .. all evident with the originals and immediately sorted once they were changed. That’s a good sign! Along towards Westruther and Duns, as those who know it will testify, this is a cracking piece of road. Undulations, fast corners you can see round, tight turns, bumps, great scenery. Lovely. I have ridden this road a lot over the years and until I tweaked the suspension on my AT parts of it were a bit like a bouncy castle. This model dealt with it with no problems whatsoever .. I don’t know if Honda have changed the suspension or perhaps this one had been set up differently as standard. All I can say is that it worked as well as mine does now after a lot of fiddling about and experimentation. Generally the bike handled really well and went where I pointed it. Full marks there. Usually there are a few other folk with bikes in the Duns Garden Centre car park to compare notes with but no-one around to chat to today. Oh well, the scones and coffee are excellent. Back over the Lammermuirs and it was blowing a hooly! My intention was to try and get couple of ‘off road’ photos up some farm tracks. However, the gusts were so strong I was getting worried about the thing blowing over so that idea was scrapped. But, that all resulted in an interesting observation. I have ridden my AT in some very strong wind conditions over a prolonged period .. i.e. all along the mediterranean coast through Spain and France with the Tramontane blowing full bore, then up the Rhone valley with the Mistral on song with some torrential rain for good measure. This version seems to cope with it better. I have no idea why .. possibly suspension set up. As a point of clarity .. luggage etc can’t be blamed for this as at least 300 miles of my trip was with no panniers, tank bag or any other bits and pieces. Down through the twisty slow bits with loose gravel, pot holes and all usual challenges, that make our roads such fun, all exactly as the previous model. Pretty much perfect at that. Along a section I know really well with some tighter but quick bends and it switches direction nicely in the Africa Twin fashion. No drama there. As the bike had only 70 miles on it I was not pushing anything but the brakes seem identical to the older model too. So back into town, return it to Two Wheels and gather my thoughts. One curry and a beer later: The original bike, in my opinion, is fantastic. This version is better. The question is by how much! Well, it is smoother and delivers the power instantly. This is a significant improvement. The other differences, real or perceived are subtle. I am sure some people will like the instrument display and functions. The sound track is a bit different but the original is fine. Some of the reported quality issues have been addressed no doubt but they never bothered me in the first place anyway. Would I trade mine in for this version? In a word ‘No’. But, that answer isn’t quite as clear cut as it sounds. If I was buying again and could afford it I’d get the newer version over the original. If I was after an AT but couldn’t stretch to the new model I wouldn’t shy away the old model for a second. Never say ‘never’ but I intend to keep my AT. I like the patina, the scrapes, the bashes, the memories. At the current usage rate it’ll have around 40,000 miles on it by its 4th birthday so we’ll have a review then .. assuming my back hasn’t forced me onto a cruiser by then!
  11. 9 points
  12. 8 points
    Despite the awful weather this afternoon I spent an enjoyable time riding a couple of demonstrators down at my favourite local dealer. The first bike ticks all the right boxes for me as it's: very comfortable (I could spend all day in the saddle), has lots of toys (heated grips, various modes, a screen with more functions than my TV, has a decent turn of speed, is economical to run, is well priced and doesn't look to bad. However riding it left me fairly cold. It was OK but was just like an oversized and more powerful NC (minus DCT). The other bike is completely impractical for my needs, it sent a cold blast of air and rain down my neck. My wrists were aching after a few miles. It was quite noisy with it's aftermarket exhaust and I just loved it. I'm still thinking about it now and I'm trying to argue with myself why I should ignore common sense and buy it. I can't have both sadly.
  13. 8 points
    Ok, it was stupid from the outset. But I am trying to determine whether I have bought the wrong bike (a '16 GS) , whether less power is more, and whether I am missing out on the best cheap bike in the market. For a start I have not really gelled with my GS, at least nowhere near as much as with my Integra. The int gives me instantaneous confidence, ignores my nervous twiddling at the bars and just goes where it has to, sacrificing its pegs if necessary. The GS in contrast leans happily into corners, sucking up all bumps and never misses a beat, just as instructed per the handlebars. Put in too much steering at your own peril. A little too much throttle? Runs wide if you are not man enough. Pulls like crazy, in any gear. At least it feels that way to me, because I do 3x as many miles on the weakly integra. It's somehow like a 6 feet high sofa on crack. So I belatedly tried the BMW R 1200 RS today. In a nutshell: The '17 engine feels a lot more refined (and somehow, a little tamer), the clutchless shifter works like dream, the handling is more composed but not stiff. The whole bike feels tighter, for lack of a better word. The ergos are obviously much less relaxed, and the stock seat is on the harsh side, but I should be able to deal with that, at just over 50 .... Wind protection is actually quite comparable. At low speeds, the handling is less nimble than the GS, which imho really is a miracle in terms of low speed balance. I found the bike interesting at the beginning of the ride, and liked it more as time went by. Not good. The second experience was on a MT-07. If the NC doesn't pack enough wallop, it is a glaring alternative, no? Just in order not to repeat the mistake of under-testing, I booked a test ride. It would have been a no-brainer to ride this one before the Beemer, but it just worked out this way. For a start it is diminutive. Not small enough to trip over, like a BMW R310 , but once I sat down, I couldnt see any bike any more, it's so small. I felt for the clutch an pulled away. To make a long story short: The bright spot is the engine. To me, it is literally bursting with energy, just begs you to rev it and dash off. Useful torque starting well below 3000 rpm and stretching to 11k. Not that you get a lot more power after say 7k, but you will never run into the limiter like with a manual NC. I was surprised how powerful it felt even having just sat on a 125hp bike. A fly in the ointment is that the vibrations are rather harsh and less pleasant than NC vibes. A bit like using an impact drill with a fresh bit: The getting on is gratifying, but it is not a nice experience. For the rest, there isn't much to write about. It feels like they saved money by leaving bits of bike away. Suspension is harsh and wobbly at the same time, the brakes are well defined but require two more rather than two fingers for a decent stop. Wind protection is nil. All in all, while the engine clearly leaves the NC in the dust, the rest of the bike isnt anywhere near them. I can see a lot more value in the bigger and much nicer looking XSR. To appease the missus for a wasted day, I plastered over some holes in the garden wall after I got home. I am still not sure whether I should just sell everything and get an X-Adv.
  14. 8 points
    Tried the RS and rather like it - if I were to get a BMW that would be the one - but my Yorkshire wallet just puckered up like a nuns wossname at the thought of spending all that money!
  15. 8 points
    I just picked this up yesterday.
  16. 8 points
    Currently a seller is pricing the basic model at just over £250 on that place not to be mentioned of auction variety. What a cracking good deal! I'm actually thinking of shelling out for this and as they set it up for your requirements exactly. This is for the NC700X variety. Have to decide quickly! Aaahh. Dagnabbit, I've gone and pressed the BUY IT NOW button and added my personal hippo weight requirements for comfort and road riding only. No pillions.
  17. 8 points
    Update (Day 84): So... IT'S FIXED. I rode the NC over 30 miles in fairly warm weather and intense city driving conditions and gear shifting was as smooth as it should be. It seems ridiculous that after 80 days at the shop, the culprit ended up being a very easy fix, the $220 shifting motor. So, I want to first thank all on this great forum who have jumped to the rescue with advice, tips, suggestions and moral support. It has been quite a roller coaster since my bike was first towed to the dealer on July 11. I am also thanking the dealer (Coleman PowerSports) which at first was slow to respond and provided sub-par repairs and testing. That coincided with them being at the height of the season and short handed. At a time were they seamed ready to drop the ball and not want my bike back in the shop, things kicked into gear and in the past month, I have seen huge improvements in returning calls and emails and keeping me updated on the repair progress. To their credit, Honda tech services provided guidance in the last repair and mis-diagnosed a faulty PCM (ECU).... As for Honda PowerSports Customer Care, overall a very disappointing experience. Their reps are obviously trained to tame the customer and talk nice but they pretty much limit the scope of their actions to facilitate communications between dealer and customer. I know their products are good (I bought 3 Honda motorcycles and 2 cars so far...) but as with many companies who manufacture good products, they get cocky and don't give a shit about isolated incidents because they know they will get buried in the overwhelming positive image the company enjoys. Things turned a bit sour after I informed them I had started a twitter feed to share my DCT woes. They took notice right away and my customer care rep called inquiring about my intentions to share this on social media... As for Honda's DCT, here are some thoughts. - After riding in town over an hour today, it keeps reminding me how great and unique the system is. That is the very one thing that would make me hesitate to fall back to a classic gear shifting motorcycle. For the record, I have owned Hondas XL125, CB500, BMW GS650, F800ST... - As far as I can tell, DCT is reliable. There are plenty of reports of riders with 30, 40, 50K and so miles with no issues at all. But if you search carefully, you will also find incidents here in there, most minor and easily taken care by resetting the DCT. More serious issues are related to a bad battery, loss of power, faulty connections, defective shifter pin or sensors. - DCT works well and can save your clutch pack from premature wear but with its 6 sensors, shifting motor, dual clutches and PCM, it definitely adds complication when comparing to a traditional bike. Despite the pretty thorough checklists in the service manual and the error codes the computer is supposed to record, there are obviously some gaps to fill when troubleshooting problems. In my case, there was no clear fault code that indicated a faulty shifting motor... - I am happy to keep ridding a DCT bike in the city but in regard to my latest experience, I'd be a bit leery to do a long, adventure journey on one. Coincidentally, as I was leaving the shop today, a mechanic told me a NC700X with 2,000 miles was brought in the day before with a similar DCT problem. I wished him good luck. Thanks all!
  18. 8 points
    I think it’s a disgrace that they charge so much for a test ride. Most dealers offer them for free.
  19. 8 points
    The sheer practicality of scooters was demonstrated to me yesterday. Diesel and I were sitting in Mrs T’s car in a supermarket car park while she popped in for a ‘few bits’ when a 400 Burgman purred to a halt beside us. The young (? never saw her face, but she was trim with a lovely bum) lady stepped off and flicked the stand down in one, easy, movement. She popped the seat open, to reveal a cavernous trunk, lifted out a sizeable rucksack with one hand and popped her helmet in with the other. And she strolled into the store.. The whole operation took no longer than getting out of a car. I spent the evening researching scooters on the internet. Just need to teach Diesel to ride pillion..
  20. 8 points
    The weather was dry and sunny if a bit windy this morning and I have sorted out insurance from today so I thought it was about time to take the Forza out for a run. Initial impressions are smooth and quite quick for 300cc, not a long way off the X9 500 at lower speeds. It has a lively and smooth launch and reasonable acceleration so much that when you look at the speedo you are going way over the limit! Not as quick as the Integra but not too shabby for a scooter. The ride and handling are superb, similar in some ways to the Integra, you can feel the family resemblance, but it is way better than the Integra. Maybe lowering the NC using dogbones ruins it as well. The Forza ride is firm but not jiggly and never jarred your spine like the Integra did. Bumps, potholes and repairs were taken without any undue feedback into the saddle or handlebars. The front and rear are well balanced, you would never know the rear was pivoting with the motor. No need to modify anything. No vibes through the bars but I will fit grip puppies as the grips are a bit thin and hard to keep squeezed. The dash is clear and easy to read and average consumption for a 50 mile 'thrash' was 74mpg and I was giving it a bit of stick, I don't subscribe to the soft running in technique. One gripe is the indicator button is stiff to flick and I constantly kept sounding the rather pathetic horn every time I used them. So used to the horn being below the indicators as on the X9 I think I sounded off at least 10 times in the 50 miles! Similar problem I had with the Integra, you get used to it. The horn will get an upgrade sometime, when I find where it is and how to get at it though it's a pathetic "peep". The brakes are good but not astounding, but they are new and may need more bedding in. I prefer the linked brakes as grabbing a handful of left lever stops rapidly but without the linking, it's more like throwing a trailing anchor out that doesn't dig in much. The fronts are more than good enough and I suppose with ABS the likelihood of a front lock and washout is reduced. The screen is less efficient than the X9, quite similar to the OEM Integra when in the highest position, with more helmet wind noise. Ducking a couple of inches quietens it considerably so maybe a lip would make it perfect. In the lower position you get almost a 'screen-less' effect, great for hot days tootling around town or country lanes. Adjustment on the move is a doddle. The lights must be OK as no-one pulled out in front of me, all drivers seemed to see me coming and no one ran in the back of me either. I was slightly disappointed in the mirrors despite reviewers saying they were superb, they aren't. I don't know what they are comparing them with but compared to the X9 Evo they are poor. Half the mirror shows your elbows and shoulders, there is no view of what is behind you at all and no adjustment improves this. They need to be 2 inches further out in line with the bar ends. They look good though. So in summary: Ride and handling - superb very Gilera Nexus or Tmax like Performance - very good for the cc Brakes - OK prefer linked though Lights - hard to say as not used in the dark Comfort - fine could ride it all day Dash and info - easy to see, clear and speedo rises rapidly! Noise and wind - not too bad screen on top setting is OK Comfort - seems well padded and good enough to ride all day
  21. 7 points
    This morning after coffee and cake at La Hogue (rates five stars on the glendon Cakeometer) Giles and myself rode the scenic way down to Mototechniks in Stowmarket where I had booked test rides on the Tracer 700 and the Tracer 900 GT. Giles had brought his licence so he did the same. What follows are my impressions of the two bikes. Entirely subjective and coloured very much by my experience riding Tigger. I started out with the 900GT and almost immediately got a sinking feeling. This is supposed to be a much lighter bike than Tigger but I could not tell any difference lugging it around. The ignition lock is sited so that only a right handed piano player can easily get at it. However, the dash is very pretty and has many functions, accessed by a wheel on the right hand bar. Apparently this works the heated grips as well but I didn't manage to work that out. Sitting on the bike I could not quite flat foot it (31 inch inside leg) and my immediate impression was the seat was hewn from fine English oak. Starting the motor revealed a nice muffled burble, proper motorbikey sound and nicer than Tigger who sounds like a bag of nails at tickover. Pulling away the ride was firm, indeed as speed increased it felt jittery, not nice at all to me compared to Tiggers sumptuous ride. The motor is undoubtedly star of the show, revving freely and sounding great. Toque happens from very low down and the power felt pretty comparable to Tigger except the torque felt flat, rather like the Tiger 800. There was no excitement to it at all. Whether this is a good or bad thing is up to you but I prefer the manic top end of Tigger. The quick shifter was nice and the cruise control worked well but only in 4th gear upwards so no help in 30mph limits. weather protection and stability were, I thought, pretty average. Giles found the screen in low position worked better than high - he also found the seat comfortable though so what does he know? So when we got to Ixworth we swopped bikes. The Tracer 700 is, in my humble opinion, a much better bike for the money. The riding position was immediately comfortable and though the leg position was not a luxurious as on the 900GT it was still fine for me - and I could flat foot it easily. The ignition was in a sensible place and the dash was simple but showed what you needed to know very clearly. The bike felt light when I moved it around in the car park as well. The motor is fabulous. It jut begs to be red lined and I saw 98mph without much effort. It does not have the urgent shunt for overtakes that I got on the 900GT or Tigger but then, it is 40bhp down so what do you expect? The screen is crap. High position is ok up to about 65mph but low is no good at all. I would factor in another episode of the never ending quest for a decent screen if I bought one. If I were coming from an NC , CB500, Aprilia Mana etc I would not hesitate to buy a Tracer 700. I think it is a nascent classic. The trouble is, I have Tigger and despite his porkiness, in every respect he is better than both Tracers, by a big margin. Consequently my quest goes on. Giles and I will be visiting Lings at some point to try the Tiger 800 (Giles) and Street Triple R (me). I know, it has no weather protection but surely someone makes a screen........
  22. 7 points
    My only advice on the AT is do several test rides before deciding. It is a niche bike and IMHO takes time to understand if it fits what you want. I must admit I got one for the gearbox, and found the engine and ride acceptable enough when I tested it. However after a few month of ownership the compromises became irritations. First off it is a very tall bike, if you see one next to a NC750X in a showroom the NC looks like a monkey bike in comparison. That's OK on the road as it carries itself well, but if you need to push it around at home it can be a struggle. Secondly there is no getting away from the fact that the front wheel makes it a slow turner. It is fine on long sweeping bends but if blasts down B road twisties is part of your regular routine then there are obviously better options. The engine has more poke than an NC but not as nippy as say a triumph triple, it is solid rather than special. Avoid the 16 plate several including mine had qc problems with rust, electrics and grips. I sound rather harsh on it which is maybe a little unfair. Some find it a great bike. My conclusion is it is an off road bike that will do a great job of carrying you down to Spain before you have fun on the green lanes. If you are going to be 99% road only, a Tiger, small GS or Tracer would give fewer compromises, and better value for money. Just my experience many would disagree.
  23. 7 points
    New Peugeot Metropolis inbound on Wednesday Can’t ride the X at the mo coz of my gammy leg so I thought I could lock this upright when I stop. Hope I can get the hang of it! url=https://postimg.cc/9DmCMs2G][/url]
  24. 7 points
    Just an observation whilst I catch up reading on the latest posts, especially in the "Other Bikes" section. An awful lot of folk are looking at or already have (myself included) smaller cc bikes, be it scoots, 3 wheelers, monkey bikes etc. etc. that we all love, enjoy and enthuse about. For the commute or fun around town they are hard to beat and I don't have to spend so much time getting geared up as much. Things seem to go full circle. I started off on a scoot. Then we progress up to the NC750's, feel the need for more power, be it Tiggers, VFR's, etc. etc. Then we need something smaller for the real world as we're not touring every day so get a 125 again.
  25. 7 points
    This one is a real paradox, it is oh so simple yet oh so very complex. The basic answer is pretty well summed up in the "realisation" statement above. There are however many other factors that play into this. As a young man the size of my bike turns into a bit of a "willy waving contest", nothing wrong with that it's just part of our historic genetic makeup, look how I can master this powerful machine so I must be the better breeding stock option. As we age many things happen that feed into our chosen motorcycling lifestyle, as we age we become more cautious, we become more thoughtful and more risk-averse. Our male competitiveness starts to subside and our physical flexibility, mobility and balance all deteriorate. The potential impact of our actions on our loved ones becomes more apparent to us. The environment in which we live and the way it is policed also impacts greatly. I could go on for a very long time about this simple/complex subject but I think we are pretty much aware of the factors judging by the very informed and mature posts displayed on this excellent forum. Geoff.
  26. 7 points
    got my bike back with new frame
  27. 7 points
    Picking up on some of the comments here on the forum it seems to me that scooters are becoming more and more relevant to more and more of us. This was highlighted to me at the weekend when I bumped into a chap who I know. When I first got chatting to him about a year ago he was riding a Triumph Street Tripple. About 4 months ago he popped round with a new Versys 650 GT that he had just bought. When I saw him at the weekend his opening shot was "you'll never guess what I am riding now" turns out he had chopped the Versys in for a Vespa GT300 and he was literally bouncing about it, said he'd never had as much fun on 2 wheels for years. He went on to say how free it made him feel and that he was under no pressure (interesting). Maybe just maybe due to many factors not least how life has changed here in the UK scooters may be indeed the future. Geoff.
  28. 7 points
    It's always the last thing you look at.
  29. 7 points
    Well here's the update..... At the weekend I tried the Kawasaki Versys 1000 GT. Such a sensible bike, with so much offered, for not a lot of money. This was the latest model and it felt much easier to ride at low speed than the one I rode before (with the twin stacked headlights). It went well enough, particularly at speed and the clutch was very light, but I left it feeling a bit unfulfilled. Yesterday my meeting finished early, and I popped over to see what my local Honda dealer had in. As it happens he'd just taken in a year old, 6,000 mile Africa Twin with all the toys in matte black. They forced me to take it out for a test, even though I'd decided that I wasn't going to like it, with that huge 21inch. tubed front tyre. I had about an hour on it, taking in town riding, country lanes and dual carriageways (I didn't try green laneing). The result....I put down a deposit and should be picking it up this weekend. I hope you'll let me stay here as part of the growing Africa Twin contingent.
  30. 7 points
    I once popped into our local Sainsburys on the Pug. Put the helmet in the seat and went in. Half an hour later came back out with a car load of shopping and nearly walked past the Pug before realising I'd not actually come in the car. Had to leave said shopping with customer services (who found it rather funny) , go back and fetch the car.
  31. 7 points
    In other news, I sat on the new Monkey bike today while waiting for my bikes paperwork. It was really comfy and I didnt feel cramped at all. Also sat on a Grom that has a seat like a plank of wood by comparison. I really want one for no sensible practical reason whatsoever.
  32. 7 points
    Hi Tumo I felt I owed it to you to read through the 11 pages of the thread in your link. Hmmmm, not particularly encouraging. Here's just a few more thoughts, some relevant some more wild cards, but anything might lead to a solution. A couple of simple things first. The engine will only start when the trans is in neutral. From what you say it sounds like it always starts fine once it has actually found N. If it can't get to N then it won't start, this is not a fault. Forget about this. The clutch initialisation is only that, it's not "resetting" the DCT electronic shifting system in any way, it just allows the clutch take up to be learnt by the system which affects the pull-away take up of the clutches and the shift quality, it won't prevent or allow it to shift if there is a fault elsewhere. I'd suggest set this process aside from here on. Certainly sounds like temperature of something may be a very relevant factor. I doubt it's actual engine coolant or oil temp as such, but may well be the effect of temp on some component or connection. Having said that, certainly check the connections for the oil temp sensor, which is down near where the shift motor is. There are a couple of basic connections to check, first and most important the one on the back of the instrument panel can cause various issues (the panel does some processing), and the main earthing point at the front left side of the rider's seat on a frame rail behind a panel. There are about a dozen wires all arriving here for a common earth point, essential for complex electrical systems. Clean/lube/refit as appropriate. I suspect it's not these but they need to be eliminated. The instrument panel connector should normally flag a MIL fault code if it is not clean, but you never know. I've been running a lithium battery for a few months now, the charging voltage is fine and stable. I suggest definitely checking the charging voltage when the engine is running, the system voltage is an absolutely fundamental aspect of any complex electrical system. Check it when first started from cold and again when it is hot after the sort of time when you get the fault happen. The MOSFET reg/rec used on the NC is very reliable, but they can fail and often these sort of faults are heat related. Again, eliminate the charging voltage. One person has reported a failed reg/rec due to corrosion on a well used bike. I've had a couple of electrical issues with mine. The connector from the right side switch gear with the supply and return from the kill switch had tarnished pins which prevented it starting. Not the same as your fault but be aware that those connectors can have poor contacts. Take apart, inspect for corrosion/tarnishing, spray with aerosol contact cleaner, refit a few times to clean the contacts. Definitely check the connector onto the shift motor, it's low down right on the motor itself so potentially susceptible to road dirt etc and could possibly have a delayed heat effect as the whole unit warms up (just a possible). I've also had a cooling fan relay go faulty. Not significant as such, but it's exactly the same relay as for the fuel pump (and maybe other things too?). Someone had a problem with a poor connector on the engine coolant temp sensor causing idle speed issues. again, not your problem but check the temp sensor connector/wiring (it's in the thermostat housing, top of engine right side). Definitely check the sidestand switch just to eliminate it, it will prevent a gear being selected from N but I don't know what would happen if it went faulty (open circuit) when it was already in a gear, I'd expect it would kill the engine (switch off fuel pump). There are 3 (identical) speed sensors in top of the gearbox case. One is vehicle speed, the other 2 are the shaft speeds for gear ratio confirmation. These should be very reliable sensors (simple magnetic pick-up coils or variable reluctance pick-ups I believe) but one owner on here had to have one replaced, can't recall the exact symptoms. Again, check connectors for any corrosion, and check the continuity between the sensor pins, I expect the workshop manual will give a typical resistance for the coil, I'd expect a few ohms. If they all measure the same then all should be well. Since the fault is so fundamental, I'd also suggest taking the shift motor gearcase off to check that all the bits inside are in good condition. It only has grease in it and each of the reduction gear shafts has a pair of ball bearing races. It's just possible there could be a mechanical issue in there, I doubt it but possible and it'd be nice to eliminate it. It's a simple easy job, just needs a new paper gasket (silly money for a paper gasket, but hey ho). I just have a small niggle in my mind about being able to coax it back through the gears when stationary by rocking the bike (allows the gear selectors to move the gears in/out of engagement) so it sounds like it wants to shift but sometimes something stops it doing it.
  33. 6 points
    So, I popped into the dealership to say that I wouldn’t be going ahead with the AT (counted 15 new and used bikes being readied for delivery this weekend, mind) and my mate (the salesman) smiled and said.. “Oh, I knew you wouldn’t” ”Why?” ”’Cause if I had your Bonnie I would want to keep it too! And anyway, when the right bike comes along you’ll know straight away - no need to try three different bikes in one morning..” Plainly he knows me better than I know myself!
  34. 6 points
    It's OK, I told them my name was Pike. I had a conference call with Germany the day after they lost some football match 6-0 or some really bad amount. They claimed they were now England fans. Its hard to breath with tea coming down your nose during a chorus of: Zwei WeltKreig und Ein Welt Cup, doo-dah, doo-dah..... They do have a sense of humour that goes beyond fitting three indicator switches. Andy
  35. 6 points
    Had a lovely run out to Forest Row to meet up with Tex for coffee. The riding position is definitely the solution to my hip issue. Sitting with my knees straight forward takes all the rotation issues away from my hip. It was the first time I had ridden for more than 20 minutes and not ended up with excruciating pain. I had to fill up on the way home just over £7.00. On the way back I came up over the North Downs and saw an indicated 62mph. GPS showing 58mph. That is about as fast as it is going get. Saying that it has only just done over 1000 miles so might loosen up. I will just have to change my mindset and get used to not having power on tap and bob along and enjoy the ride. I have also get out of the habit of nodding at other riders as not one has nodded back so far🤣🤣 It certainly holds its line and I was able to go through the lovely bends on the way from East Grinstead into Forest Row at the speed limit, with confidence.
  36. 6 points
    Tex, my advice (feel free to ignore ) is to walk away, forget about that shiny new bike for a couple of weeks and then decide whether you still have a strong desire to change. From your posts over the last year or so the two main things I've picked up is that you absolutely love Triumphs, and your current bike in particular, and that you don't get to ride that often or that far these days. While you could make a case that both the AT and the 800X are 'better' bikes in some way than your Triumph, neither will stir the soul like your Triumph once the initial 'thrill' of having a new bike in the garage wears off and, unless you plan to change your riding habits, both will likely give you less pleasure of ownership. Added to that the the possible loss you stand to suffer due to the residuals you mention around your Triumph will be far higher on either bike in a year or two's time as they are both much more expensive (and therefore will lose more) and neither are exactly holding their residuals, for different reasons, on the second hand market. Far better to spend a few hundred pounds further personalising your Triumph and as much time as possible riding it BTW was it a DCT AT that you tried out?
  37. 6 points
    For sure the AT isn't as sharp as a sportsbike but the only time I felt a little aprehensive was when I took it to an IAM skills day and the morning sessions were wet however that feeling didn't last long and I was able to keep up with one of the GSXR's in my group and even pass another, in the wet. I guess it depends what you're used to and also (dare I say it) how much you analyse these things? Maybe having a variety of old tat that I ride alongside modern bikes then I don't really notice a bit of wobble here or less than pin sharp accuracy there? My mate, an IAM examiner, never ceases to amaze me on what differences he can feel between tyres and suspension set ups but then he has to have the suspension changed on every bike he has ever owned After my 4+ hours out on the AT yesterday it reminded me what a superb bike it is for foul weather, crap road surfaces and getting a real move on, its certainly rock solid at three figure speeds .... even if on the AT speedo that might only be about sixty Probably shouldn't post this on this forum (please no one bother to type and tell me your opinion on it) but, out of interest, I tried no hands on the A30 at an indicated 85 yesterday in less than perfect conditons and it was rock solid, even with tyres not too far from needing replacement. I'm not saying the AT is perfect, like most modern bikes it's way too heavy, Honda missed a trick not having fly by wire cruise control and the seat is a bit of plank after 2 or 3 hours but it's a hugley capable bike and I can't wait to put some decent Winter miles on it. Not sure I would replace your Triumph with one though, it's a bit like the NC, a truly great bike but not one to fall in love with ... IMO of course.
  38. 6 points
    It's the realisation of what you need rather than what you want.
  39. 6 points
  40. 6 points
    Well, the economics may well stack up for you company car / car allowance wallah out there, but for the remainder who have to buy our own, it just doesn't work out. You've got to save a hell of a lot of road tax and liquid fuel to overcome the £5k plus premium to make the init ian purpose. However, on a slightly different note. As I was exercising the Versys this afternoon, I went past a farm advertising "Hybrid Chickens". I didn't stop to enquire as to the purchase price or running costs, but I thought what a great idea. After all, battery chickens went out of fashion years ago, so this has to be progress. And I thought "Green" chicken was something you only ever found in the back of your local Chinese
  41. 6 points
    It’s a race bike. You’re supposed to take the sodding things apart every five minutes! That aspect alone would put me off the 450. Take Brian’s 10k miles and divide by 4 litres of fully synthetic every 620 miles.. go to France on holiday and you’re gonna have to do a couple of oil/filter changes during the trip. I can take a joke but that’s a whole bloody pantomime! Edit: What I do like (a lot) is the new 300 Neo Café Sports. What a cracking little thing that is. Hopelessly impractical for a huge great lump like me, but I could buy one just to sit and look at it.
  42. 6 points
    Funnily enough I thought the same, but it's turned out to be a really capable bike. The trip that settled it for me was my trip to France. We left from Bilbao and over the next 12 days rode all the way to the Normandy beaches. In the company of my friends 1200 GS, it never felt like it was struggling to keep up. It copes with luggage without really noticing and it fits me like a glove. The seat could be better, and with the sheepskin cover it is a bit, but overall I'm really pleased with it, it takes me places I couldn't get to on my other bikes.
  43. 6 points
    Ciaran....have you ever considered a career in automotive journalism? ☺...brilliant report...enjoyable read👍
  44. 6 points
    Walking stick through the front wheel. Sorry mate, didn't see you - was just waving my stick to get some dogpoo off the end. Hey, you look cool with no skin on your face. Never mind, they can do wonders with plastic surgery these days. They will just take a graft off your bum. Not sure what they'll do about your knees, elbows and the palms of your hands though. This might seem an extreme response but my wife just spent three months in a wheel chair following a fall and subsequent surgery and it is older folk who are most at risk from these lunatics. If I got knocked down by one of them I dread to think of the potential grief involved.
  45. 6 points
    Valentino Rossi uses one as a pit bike - so it has instant ‘cred’ then.. More seriously, I remember ‘Cager’ being really impressed with one. I will try and dig out his review.. Edit: Here you are..
  46. 6 points
    That’s exactly why in my opinion cyclist should have to have third party insurance.
  47. 6 points
    What a big disappointment. Same old same old. Innovation is virtually dead in the motorcycle industry.
  48. 6 points
    Exactly Simon. The problem with magazine reviews is that the said magazines tend to be driven by advertising so when a manufacturer gives you a bike to review a bad review could be suicidal. Tell the truth, an average ride with a jerky throttle response crap low speed handling, and said manufacturer will take his advertising revenue to a more sympathetic publication. Of course the endless junkets and launch parties coupled with favourable reviews become self perpetuating and are good for both parties. Let's face it you can review a bike on the roads round Manchester, you don't have to go some swish resort in the Pyrenees for that but it does oil the wheels, so to speak. This is one reason I rarely buy magazines these days. Once you remove the adverts and the dubious reviews there's precious little content to justify the price. I much prefer real world reviews provided by people on YouTube.
  49. 6 points
    Around town I would choose the SH (or another step through). On the ‘open road’ the big fairing on the Forza would carry the day. Bugger! Now I want two scooters..
  50. 6 points
    You lot are OLD 🤔😁😁 I was riding a Raleigh Blazer with stabilisers when they were about. Maybe I should add that one to the list of bikes I don't want back? 🤔😁😁😁 Andy
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