Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Tex

    Tex

    Supporters


    • Points

      426

    • Content count

      12,709


  2. Rocker66

    Rocker66

    Supporters


    • Points

      415

    • Content count

      15,447


  3. Andy m

    Andy m

    Supporters


    • Points

      331

    • Content count

      4,380


  4. embee

    embee

    Supporters


    • Points

      172

    • Content count

      3,832



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 24/03/19 in all areas

  1. 20 points
    After lots of deliberation and soul searching I have finally made up my mind and ordered a new white CB500X today. It is coming with the following extras fitted Genuine Honda Light bar Lights knuckle guards smoke screen tank pad Givi carrier R&G crash bungs R&G rad guard fenda extenda The following to be transferred from my Crossrunner Givi top box Satnav powered cradle SW- Motec footrests Once again I got a very fair deal from Kent M/Cs
  2. 18 points
    New bike now collected. Just need to wait for the extras to arrive
  3. 16 points
    Went to Kent M/Cs for lunch today which turned into a 100 mile ride meaning I have now done 220 miles. Not bad considering I only picked it up late Friday afternoon and couldn’t go riding Sunday due to it being Mothering Sunday. That mileage has been enough to convince me that despite the fact that I will miss several aspects of the Crossrunner ( OK who called out the motor) I have done the sensible thing. For example when I first got it home I went to push it into the garage which mean getting over a lip in the drive and using the amount of force that I had to use to get the Crossrunner in I nearly threw the CB the length of the garage. As well as moving it about I find getting on and off the CB much easier and confidence inspiring. I was concerned about the handling with the 19” front wheel but it’s fine and only slightly noticble when doing tight turns such as into the drive. The suspension whilst obviously not as good as the Crossrunner is more than acceptable for a budget bike. The riding position is comfortable with seat certainly superior to the NC but not unite as good as the Crossrunner. The engine feels smoother than my previous two CB500Xs and the extra torque certainly shows when accelerating. Something I find really nice is the really light clutch ( for those that can remember them) as in 1 finger operation. when riding it’s much easier to get round tight bends and more confidence inspiring when I have to come to a stop. One big consideration is of course running cost such as insurance fuel tyres servicing and so on. There’s no way that I’m say that the Crossrunner isn’t a great bike and that I won’t miss it but the CB is as much fun but in an entirely different way and I must say at the risk of upsetting some people on here I personally find it more fun than I ever did either of my NCs I got the footrestschanged over today and I’m looking forward to the rest of the accessories to arrive but of course being a new model they are not immediately available. Here’s hoping for some decent weather so that I can add to those miles.
  4. 14 points
    Tried this out today: My wife caught the train up to London this morning to spend the day with our Daughter so after I dropped her at the station at 9am I popped into local bike dealers Hayballs and took this out for half an hour. Bloody chilly, especially with open face helmet on but I only did a 16 mile loop with quite a lot of that in villages or through Salisbury so didn't get too cold. The bike had 600 miles on the clock and started first press of the switch settling to a smooth tickover - already one up on my Ennie. Clutch and throttle nice and light and the gearbox was a real gem, even from cold. The first few minutes was out of the industrial estate and through a 20mph section and I was immediately comfortable with the bike and able to trickle along, feet up, at walking speeds. Fueling is very smooth and no need for clutch slipping at slow speed, pulls very well from low revs with a nice burble from the exhaust. Suspension is set up quite soft (the rear shocks were on their softest setting) but bike handled well for the short time I had it and no weaving or sense of vagueness at high speed (I was fortunate to find a short stretch of private road in which it wound up to 90 on the clock with more to come) despite the high bars. The brakes seem well suited, I tried the ABS out on the rear which didn't seem overly intrusive and the front hauled the bike up quickly when I tried a couple of hard braking checks. The footrests are a little further back than I would like, most un-Enfield like, but I got used to them pretty quick and I don't think they would be a problem. I would adjust the bars though as they were quite upright and I felt twisting them to bring my hands a couple of inches further back would have felt more natural feel. The seat was a little hard, not uncomfortable on the short trip I had but would want a longer ride check it out, seemed enough room for a pillion and I would think it would make a very nice Sunday morning potterer but have enough about it for longer trips. Enfield really seem to have put together a nice engine/gearbox combo, a very decent first attempt and really a decent bike even if you ignore the absolute bargain price. I was using my 2015 Guzzi V7 as a comparison and I would say that the Enfield is a nicer bike, smoother, much comfier suspension, brakes as good if not slightly better, no silly intrusive traction control and better fueling. Not quite the character, possibly a little too smooth, the parallel twin felt very similar to the AT when wound up, although not as powerful of course. At £5699 it's an absolute bargain and, if I was in the market for a bike it would get my cash over the V7 but I don't think I'll be trading the V7 as any improvement is marginal and it doesn't look as nice as the V7 (IMO) and lacks that v twin character. I wouldn't argue with anyone who tells me I'm wrong though, the Interceptor really us a very nice motorcycle, well done Enfield.
  5. 11 points
    Had some Farkles put on the Monkey today. Now I just need to add the clock and leather tool roll R&G Tail Tidy R&G Heel Guards R&G Mirror Extenders R&G axle Protectors
  6. 10 points
    So, here we are. My take on the Moto Guzzi V85TT. I must preface this by saying my Tiger Sport is the bike I am comparing the MG against. So far no bike has been better than Tigger though the Tracer 700 comes close. Anyway, the MG is a very characterful looking bike. Chunky. Bike magazine reckons it looks like a Tonka toy and I would not disagree. Paint seems solid and it looks well put together. First off though I asked the salesperson to take off the panniers which are chunky aluminium and look the business. But I hate panniers so they had to come off – and guess what? They do not have a carrying handle. Sat on the bike. Nice, I can get both feet flat on the floor – I am a 31 inch inside leg. Bars are wide and set a bit higher than Tigger but not a problem. However, the ignition key is set just in front of the tank. Once you have a tank bag on – and I always have a tankbag on – it will be a nightmare getting the key in and out, though probably not as bad as the Tracer 900. Weight feels the same as Tigger. Start the motor and get that Guzzi rock which is nice too. Sidestand up and select first gear – light action but gear lever not quite where I was expecting it. The dash tells you what gear you are in – only it doesn't until you let the clutch out. This means that when you come to a halt you cannot be sure where you are in the gearbox till you let the clutch out... Mind you, the clutch action is fantastic, probably the lightest lever action I have ever experienced. The motor is vibey at low revs, to the point that the seat would be dangerous to sit on if you are a lady of sensitive disposition. At higher revs there are vibes in the bars and pegs though not dreadful ones. I would worry though that my arthritic hands would not like this. When you open it up the bike is quite lively considering it is 80bhp but the dashboard has an annoying colour display telling you to change gear. I ignored it. Up at 70 – 75mph it is apparent that the screen is as effective as a Street Triple flyscreen – so not very relaxing for motorway work. The handling is great though, even with weird tyres on it felt very planted in bends. The suspension must be ok as I just did not notice it at all. Bit soft at the front mind when you grab a fistful. And the brakes are not very sensitive. They stop the thing but you need to apply some effort. Very easy to do a feet up U turn on though as the weight all seems low down, like on a GS. The average fuel display read 47mpg which did not impress me. Even allowing the bike was new and as a demo probably being caned everywhere I would think it could do better – the Tiger 800 turns in 61mpg! And Tigger manages high 50s. Back at the dealership I discovered the sidestand was a bugger to put down, not easily to foot at all and a pretty ugly looking thing too. Now if everything else had been perfect the elephants in the room are still there – firstly those tubed wheels. If I bought one I would have to get them converted. Secondly, the dealer network and parts supplies. My nearest MG dealer is Wheels in Peterborough and that is over 50 miles of not very nice roads to get to. The only V85TT they have at the moment is the demonstrator and they are expecting deliveries sometime in May. Given the uncertainty of the unmentionable political thing I don't think I would buy one, even if it was perfect – which it isn't. So in my book Tigger remains the best bike out there for me. I think there might be an update at the end of this year so I'll be off to put some new tyres on shortly and be putting a few miles on.
  7. 10 points
  8. 9 points
    One reason I do my own. I do not believe you have to have them do this to keep the warranty. It only eases the pain if you claim. That said, they can reject any claim for mis-use anyway. If they are the cause, this is exactly what they will do. I will do anyone's oil change service for one bottle of decent red or four bottles of proper beer and a packet of suitable biscuits. You provide the oil and filter, but get to share the biscuits. I will stamp your service book. The bike will only be washed round the drain plug and filter unless you want a go on my jet wash while I eat biscuits. Tuition is free. BTW, I take my tea strong with a tiny splash of milk and the dog prefers playing ball to watching oil changes. Andy
  9. 9 points
    Apparently my new bike will be ready late tomorrow afternoon although all the accessories won’t be here yet. Weather forecast is good so it will be a nice change to pick up a new bike in decent weather. At least I will be able to take the new bike to Dungeness tomorrow.
  10. 9 points
    It's a two-way thing though, innit? You get the 'snowflakes' who go off in a tantrum that would make a three year old jealous just because someone made some mildly disparaging remark about his/her 'pride and joy'; eg "It would have looked better in black" or "It could have done with a lower gap between 1st and 2nd". Then you get the gits who mercilessly flay any bike which doesn't match their idea of a 'real bike'. As a one-time owner of a CX500EC I can tell you that it gets really irritating after you've heard the "it's a lardy piece of sh*t, innit" for the gazillionth time. I personally don't see the attraction of Brit iron, Elsies, Dukes, crotch rockets that require a weekly visit to a chiropractor, Harleys, BMWs, trikes, wheelies, donuts, faux carbon fibre, ... etc. But if YOU do, that's fine ... just don't take the piss out of me for have owned a C70, 250 Superdream, Plastic Maggot (I wear that nickname with pride ), 600 Revere, 650 Deauville and various NCs. They might all be boring sh*t to YOU but I enjoyed every bloody minute of them all (well except the Revere, it was pants ). ** When I say YOU I'm not actually aiming it at any particular individual. It's just a neutral, generic reference (My backside is well covered, I hope! ).
  11. 9 points
    I found the following improved my gearshifting dramatically. They became smoother, more efficient and faster than I could ever have previously hoped to achieve. Step 1: Got a DCT Step 2 (optional): Press "-" or "+" if/when required
  12. 8 points
    I read a couple of reviews where the only thing they could find to criticise the new 1250 GS about was the fact that the handlebar switches are not backlit, as apparently they now are on some KTMs and Ducatis. That set me thinking about whether I could devise a way to overcome this grievous shortcoming! Here is the result, using some LED lights on bendy stalks, intended for use to light up your laptop keyboard, covered with transparent heatshrink to keep out the weather. The lights are powered from a dual 12V to USB converter, and I have routed the power to that through a "dusk to dawn" light controlled switch so that it only comes on in the dark. I might try putting some red gel filter material over the lights, held on with some new heatshrink, to tone them down a bit and get that upmarket cockpit ambience as seen in some expensive cars! Light sensor:
  13. 8 points
    OK - you've got it. The lowered exhaust allows my Shad pannier rails to be fitted from the last GS, and I had already added brackets for the tool tubes to these. Also as Ralph has observed my wallet/bank account is a lot lighter and continues to be drained for mods and farkles! On the last GS I just fitted a big chrome exhaust from the RT model as the integral link pipe on this is at the required angle, and it fits straight onto the the outlet from the cat, just needing an extension to the hanger bracket. This was OK, and I actually grew to quite like the look of it, but this time round I was more ambitious and wanted to have the correct exhaust, but fitted at a different angle so that I could refit my Shad pannier rails. To achieve this I bought another RT exhaust, but a more or less scrap one with severely dented end can, and sawed off the link pipe section. I then bought a cheap GS exhaust with cracked plastic bits and chopped off its link pipe section. I also cut the heat shield brackets off this for re-use. I used the plastic end pieces that came with the bike, but wanted to keep the original exhaust unmolested for if (when!) I sell the bike so that I can put it back to standard. I then spent a lot of time grinding and filing to adjust the fit of the RT link pipe to the GS exhaust can to get the positioning where I wanted it. The final challenge was to work out the exact place to put the brackets for the GS heat shield, and then clamp them into place. Once I was happy with it I took the whole thing off to a local exhaust specialist who welded on the brackets and then welded the link pipe to the can in the orientation I had marked up. He did a great job while I waited and only charged me £15. Frankenstein exhaust fitted and with a coat of high temperature paint: I then had to fabricate an extension to the heat shield to cover the gap caused by the change in angle. I used some reasonably thick stainless steel sheet, and because I don't have any metal working equipment I had to improvise a way to curve it, but after the best part of a day spent cutting, bending, grinding and filing I was fairly happy with the result and inserted a rivnut into the flange on the original heat shield to fasten it in place.
  14. 8 points
    went to hunts in manchester today, now they have a 65 mile '18 model 500x with £500 accessories for 5k which is quite a saving on new, so the first bike I took out was a '17 plate 500x, Ive had one before and yep it was ok, but Ive been there before and I wasn't exited about it enough to want to buy another. Then I took a NC X manual out as my NC was DCT and I want something a bit different. Again nice , but been there and not enough to attract me to buy one. Then the new cb500x, ('19), I really thought 'this is a waste of time as Ive just ridden one. How wrong I was, my wife was pillion on all 3 bikes and the new 500 feels bigger and roomier, I've not checked the spec yet but it must have more changes than just a bigger front wheel. The motor feels slightly torquier, not massively , but it is smoother than the previous model for sure. The new dash is also very nice too. I'm picking up my new white one hopefully next weekend.
  15. 7 points
    These were some of my favourite bikes from today's classic bike show Several CB750s celebrating the anniversary of it's launch. This was my favourite One for Slowboy A rather nice special from Oxney Motorcycles Another special. I love the name on the tank. A rare Suzuki stroker unusual racer A MV for someone who is only very wealthy as opposed to extremely wealthy.
  16. 7 points
    Oooh. This could be a slippery slope...why do clowns have big shoes and small cars 😉
  17. 7 points
    Just been watching a YouTube review of the 2019 500X (very positive. ) and in the comments section someone said “Here in Canada you could buy four of those for the cost of one BMW GS!” And a different person added “Yes, and all four would weigh the same as one GS!” Patently untrue, but it tickled me..
  18. 7 points
    How dare you SIr! Denigrating the finest of British Engineering. Think of our car producers such as British Leyland and their magnificent models such as the Marina. Triumph motorcycles didn't rot as those early Japanese bikes did as they had a brilliant anti-rust oil mist system, and drip trays were cheap and plentiful.
  19. 7 points
    oh dear, oh dear, oh dear Ian, you've only gone and done it now
  20. 7 points
    Well 1st day was spent most adjusting things like handle bars etc to suit me and greasing yes my favourite ! ,as you lot will know , enfield use less grease then Honda if that is at all believable, rear shock linkage had zero grease on the bearings now well packed with the slippery stuff as is a lot of pivots etc . Rides very nicely , certainly no speed demon but copes very well with normal speeds and road conditions , quite happy 😁
  21. 7 points
    Having now taken the Forza to bits a second time I realized that I'd made heavy weather of it previously in trying to remove individual pieces of bodywork X9 style. There are screws that are a faff to access, especially to refit so this time I gave it more thought, and discovered that Mr Honda also put some thought into it and made it easy. 1. Remove the grab rails (4 bolts) complete with rack if fitted 2. Remove the tail top panel above the lights (2 silver self tappers) by pressing the top front lip down until the tabs unhook from the lip of the tub then slide it rearwards 3. Remove battery access panel (3 silver shoulder screws) 4. Remove the three self tappers at the bottom of the lip below the battery (1 silver in the center and 1 black on each side) 5. Remove the push pins on each top front corner of the seat tub, the 2 push pins holding in the tool kit storage and remove it, a further push pin on the side further forward and two more on the RH side opposite 6. Remove 4 silver bolts 2 on the top rear lip near the rear grab rail bolt and 2 half way along the bottom outside edge of the tub 7. Lift the rear of the tub up and pull it to the rear and lift it out. You can now access the engine, regulator rear suspension, engine mounting air filter etc easily (10 minutes work) 8. Remove 2 black self tapper screws under the beak above the number plate light 9. Remove a push pin either side on the lower lip of the side panel just above and to the rear of the pillion pegs 10. Disconnect the tail light connector and remove the 2 silver bolts on top of the light unit 11. Now pull the rear light, the tail fairing and both side panels rearwards feeding the wiring connector through, until the hooks disengage along the lower edge of the side panels and then lift the complete rear body assembly clear of the bike (further 5 minutes) Now the individual panels and the light assembly can be separated easily if required 1. 2 large silver screws on each side release the light unit which unhooks from the rear fairing by sliding forwards 2. A silver self tapping screw on the forward lower point of the rear fairing and a black self tapper on the rear outside flange separate each side panel from the tail fairing. Reassembly is pretty much a reverse of the above making sure to engage all the 'hooks' that hold the panels together, not forcing anything as you cannot persuade them in later without risking breaking the tabs off. The lip on the tub top edge can be persuaded to sit below the side panel top edge fairly easily and looks better. Remember to feed the tail light wiring through and reconnect the plug to the loom. You cannot get at this connector with the tub in place. The reason for dismantling yet again was to fit a little module with a relay and diodes with a single sounder so the indicators bleep but only when used with the ignition on. Previously I just tapped in a sounder to each side but it bleeped every time the indicators flashed when the key was detected or disarmed which was annoying. There is a disused power connector also at the back LH side which could be used for an underseat power socket or a light. This is there to feed the electric top box opener accessory which I don't think is available in the UK (yet).
  22. 6 points
  23. 6 points
    Twice. My actual first 'big' bike after I bought my test was pretty much an exercise in me buying the first thing I saw. It already had the 33hp restrictor kit fitted you see so I was adamant I wanted it. In hindsight, spending £800 on it should have told me what condition it was in. This was a Mk1 Suzuki Bandit S (the faired ones) as pictured below. I was the 11th person to own it, had about 47k on the clock. Ran like a dog, rode like a dog, felt like a dog. It was also an 830mm seat which, for someone whose 5ft 5, is simply too tall but of course 18 year old me wasn't going to be told that. I only rode it for about 2/3 months. It lied dormant in my parents' yard for months when I bought it's replacement till I put it up on gumtree, not even bothering to test if it still worked or not. Queue me frantically jump starting it until it finally ticked over, ran for a little while and took it for a long blast about two or three hours before the buyer turned up! I saw it in 2015, overtook me on the M27. Someone had gone to the trouble of fitting LED DRLs into the little side fairings. It's now untaxed and without an MOT to its probably sat in someones garage somewhere unloved. (Registration is V147 KPU for anyone interested). The first big bike I like to remember was the XJ900S Diversion, one of the later ones (WJ02 WWU). Borrowed £1500 from my grandpa to buy it from a dealer that was in a farm unit somewhere around Chichester way. Had to wait an age for the restrictor kit to come but got the train down to these teeny little village and walked through fields to get to the dealer. Had 52k when I started on it and had a lot more than that when I sold it. The drive shaft was corroded all on the outside but mechanically completely fine. Road like a magic carpet and even with the restrictor still tanked it way past the speed limit when wanted. Only bad thing was weighing the same as a small ocean liner and the fuel economy was rubbish. But that bike got me through storms, snow and ice, dirt tracks, midnight courier runs between family members...got me and my other half at the time around all of hampshire, took him back and forth to hospital on all his diabetic check ups. I sold it to a car dealer as part of a trade in. In the end they sold it on to their head mechanic who still uses it almost every day. I see it now and then when I go back to Gosport and have often entertained leaving a note asking them to contact me if they ever sell it. *sigh*
  24. 6 points
    Janet my over half picked Sportster 1200t superlow couple weeks ago. Bigger tank and greater fuel range than normal sportster. After riding Route 66 on a Heritages Soft Tail Classic, it gave her the confidences to go for somthing with bigger engine. She loves it. Even had moor confidence to go Sportster sickness ride to Donnington Park and back on Friday. Went for blastin the Yorkshire Dales together today. I'm ridng it next Saturday to Manchester Harley.
  25. 6 points
    Saw these really tasty bikes outside the entrance to Ashford Classic Bike Show
  26. 6 points
    I have just had a short 45 minute spin (motorway, rough backroads and A roads) on the 19 CBX. I have long had my eye on one of this model, but since the changes made for 2019 especially with the bigger front wheel, my interest has grown further. I now need to borrow the test bike again but for a day long ride. I currently have other bikes but my do it all bike (other than pillion work) is an X-Adv and that is a much liked motorcycle/scoot. My initial findings were not dissimilar to Rockers. This is a very good bike for the money. I too found that the motor was smoother than the Rally Raid version that I had previously ridden. I took it on to really rough backroads because that is where I live on my bikes mostly. It was more comfortable than my X-Adv in such conditions. However it was a little skittish suspension wise and the improved control of a better rear shock would probably help. To achieve the sort of performance that I like on such roads the motor was more than willing to rev freely and the gearbox ready to be well used. The tyres were not good with the rear slipping a little on a couple of occasions but that may have been due to their newness. However my experience has been that OEM tyres on Hondas generally are not good. I have no doubt that a set of Road 5's would make a huge difference. With 45 minutes to try this bike initially I did not get to find out everything about it but the overall impression was very good. I now have a dilemma. I am a little younger than Rocker at 68 but even so, pushing around a heavy bike is not ideal for me either with wall to wall arthritis etc. However for now I can manage and thus I still have a Suzuki VStrom 1000 for touring duties with my Wife fully loaded. I have noticed though that over the past 3/4 years I have been going off big powerful motorcycles. When not in use two up the Suzuki stays in its berth. I hadn't ridden it for a while until recently when I took it out to ready it for a weekend trip. On that day riding solo I soon found out again that it goes way too fast in any given situation on just a whiff of throttle. In short big bikes make riding too fast far too easy. A smaller engine will make one work a lot harder to attain similar speeds and as such one is much more aware of the speeds one is doing on a small bike. Since obtaining a CRF250L two years ago for trail riding I have rediscovered the joy of riding small bikes. That little bike has given a very good account of itself on the road in the company of more powerful machines as long as the road is plenty twisty. So as I say I now have a dilemma. What to part with to make room for a CB500X........
  27. 6 points
    The perfect bike is the one taxed, insured, going to start first time and in your garage on a sunny day you have free. The rest is just mechanical minutiae and top-trumps stuff to get conversation flowing over the first pint or on here when the alternative is listening to your boss talk about his ***ing push bike. Andy
  28. 6 points
    The stand is really not that heavy, I also find carrying a paddock stand around on long trips inconvenient.
  29. 6 points
    Too right, enjoy what you have, they are great to ride doing what they are designed for. I am ex-member of the "faithful" and undoubtedly owe apologies to those who were disenchanted before I was and tried to tell me. Life is easy when you believe everything is right so long as you have the right badge. It is a less nice feeling when you realise you are walking across the desert in MX boots because time spent learning about water pumps would have been better than keeping said faith. The "doom mongers" I find an odd bunch. I bought a Yamaha (light, easy to keep going, rots like Fridays fish supper on Tuesday) and on that basis came round to the idea that every manufacturer has something going for it (warning, this logic leads you to a Ural). Taking any bike and replacing the bits that were badly designed, badly fitted, bought on the cheap etc. leaves you with a DIY special no one actually designed and is still in the test stages. Why not just buy an Enfield? Sorry, more seriously, this seems to be keeping the faith just for the sake of it? The bike makers love the faithful though. Harley are an easier one to follow from creation, a National Marque with a traditional product and a lifestyle image from a golden period in the richest country in the world. Triumph have done a fair job along the same lines, giving buyers that Call the Midwife/Heartbeat vibe. BMW's message is either utterly confused or pure genius and I no longer get it. Back in the 90's it was based on the quality differences they had in the 70's (weight was seen as good by the faithful FFS), today I'm confused, some sort of "join the Elite" vibe? I like it round here. Possibly we should change the name to the "NC way of thinking forum" seeing as hardly anyone has one, but anyone who is thinking about it probably gets the bigger picture and can discuss it sensibly. Andy
  30. 6 points
    A lot of that has become rather familiar since I started frequenting the UKGSer forum! You get the badge fanatics for whom BMW can do no wrong, and when faults are reported, they round on the owner and more or less accuse them of incompetence and causing the fault themselves. They in turn get set upon by the doommongers who suggest it is all a BMW conspiracy to sell cheap Chinese rubbish disguised as premium German products, and that every bike is in imminent danger of failing, or even physically collapsing. I have to say the prospect of sporting that particular badge on my motorcycle made me think long and hard about whether to proceed with buying one - it was a definite disincentive in my eyes. All this is not helped by a series of badly handled blunders by BMW, admittedly all now recalled/corrected, but it took them a while to even admit to a generic problem. In each case it seemed to go through the early reporters being accused of misusing/abusing their bikes, before the weight of evidence from more and more instances caused a U-turn. We had the fork tubes collapsing due to a change in manufacturing methods, then the wheel collapses due to spokes becoming loose, again a manufacturing error. The first owner reporting that was accused by the faithful of incompetent brake maintenance, leading to the caliper coming loose and smashing the spokes! Finally we have brake fluid leaks after BWM started sourcing the front calipers for the new R1250GS from the American company Hayes instead of Brembo. A leaked email revealed that this was detected in early production and corrected, but BMW somehow failed to remove the affected bikes from the supply chain and fix them before they got into the hands of their owners, which incompetence was of course asking for trouble. In this latest fiasco the badge fanatics were insisting that a little fluid weeping from the calipers was a trivial issue and why were people making such as fuss, while the doommongers are all now setting out their plans to buy secondhand Brembo calipers to replace the "crap" Hayes items on their new and unaffected bikes. Apparently apart from the leaks, having the Hayes items on the bikes means they don't provide such good feel for their heroic pilots when using maximum braking effort while "outrunning sports bikes in the twisties". As for me - I just enjoy riding a bike which more than meets my needs and wants.
  31. 6 points
    Anyone who has a problem with GS owners is just jealous.. Oddly, driving to Gatwick this morning in pissing rain I was passed by a group of 5 boxers, 3 RTs and 2 GSs. All just swished past and sounded so, well, classy. Once you have boxers in your blood you’ll always be a little bit queer for them. And I’m dreadfully sorry if that causes offence to anyone, hopefully not,but saying ‘have a soft spot’ for them just doesn’t cover it.
  32. 6 points
    No, it's two of us who don't know what we're talking about.
  33. 6 points
    Took ruby out for a gallop today well actually a fast trot , if you have ridden one you will know what I mean , did actually overtake a car ,only time speed is a problem is long dual carriageways etc , town and country roads are great , potters along great at 50 /60 , all bedding In nicely- makes me smile , topbox and tank bag duly fitted hoping to modify some hinkley Bonneville pannier brackets to suit , pirelli mt60 tyres seem well suited , I'm chucking it about quite enthusiastically with no problems , all good so far with 1st service coming up which I will be doing some time soon
  34. 6 points
    This thread is teetering on the abyss, oil already mentioned and we'll be onto the California race blokes run in by 20 miles at full throttle any second now! The thing will all such information is knowing what the posters aim is. Most riders on here are leisure, touring and commuting riders. We want efficiency and reliability. I can sympathise to some extent with the "no clunk" people, but honestly if it's designed that way who cares for ten times a day, these gearboxes last 100000 miles easily, we aren't talking Enfields where a change of clunk possibly signals impending pedestrianism. I aren't changing the oil for such mechanical minutiae. The race people posting as "this is how you should do it" are basically just wrong and I have a lot less sympathy. Running something at 105% to gain the last 1% of performance is fine when you don't care about the state of it once the champagne cork pops. It is less fine when you need to go to work tomorrow as well. Race fashion is why we have useless mudguards and mirrors and brakes that run cold and chains that took 25 years to develop to a usable state. Andy
  35. 6 points
    I'm really enjoying my Forza at the mo - nice and light, comfy, fantastic around town and pretty nippy really for what it is. It'll do for me for a while especially with the meagre mileage I do until I'm ready to get my RE 650 twin.
  36. 5 points
    A few years ago following a very heavy drinking session with a friend who was heavily into these examples of Yank Ironmongery I became the owner of a Dyna Glide. Cost at the time was if memory serves £10,700. A couple of weeks and a £400 backrest later friend and I are on the ferry heading for the South of France with our respected wifes flying down to join us in a couple of days. Long story short, seriously considered ditching the automotive obsenity down there, reporting it stolen and flying back with them but basic honesty precluded this course of action. When I did ride it back stuck it on Fleabay and sold within days for £10,000, amazing, and for me the only redeeming feature. I also found the stick on "ponytail" and trying to "snarl" all the time to be a little tedious. Geoff.
  37. 5 points
    I would try a 'thread chaser' before going to the trouble of a helicoil etc, you can make one from a bolt with the same thread and cut a slot into the thread, probably a video on this on Youtube?
  38. 5 points
    Hell Fred, just fit a sound to light module and ... Fred's Mobile Disco!
  39. 5 points
    suffolk58

    KTM

    Just to add to the story... A chap I know was stopped by an eagle eyed motorist, who noticed black smoke coming from his KTM 1190 and didn't think it was right. The wiring loomed had started to melt, but was caught before it went up in flames. The irony is, the owner is a (retired) fire officer.
  40. 5 points
    And that’s exactly what you would be facing! Go for the pattern diaphragms from the USA. File the Chinky flat slides idea under ‘magnificently stupid’..
  41. 5 points
    For that sort of money I would do much more than that. Oops sorry wrong forum.. Just saw chains and lube and started typing..
  42. 5 points
    The picture is from here: https://www.rolandsands.com/blog/588/-bmw-motorrad-concept-101-the-spirit-of-the-open-road I'm really loving the new 1250GS Tony. It's even more grunty than the 1200, so when you go for an overtake it just goes into warp drive, regardless of gear, and even two-up, and you don't need to get it up to high revs either, which I guess is the benefit of having massive torque over a wide rev range. It makes 143 Nm at 6250 rpm or 105 ft lb in old money which is more than most other bikes, and has 120 Nm between 3500 and 7750 rpm. It's better behaved at low speed too, no doubt due to the softer cam the ShiftCam thingie allows it to use at low revs. Overall pretty happy with it even though I really wanted an RS. There are a few other improvements too, like the Hill Start. I didn't use the previous manually activated version because it needed a lot of revs to break the brake activation and the release point was a bit inconsistent which caused very jerky starts. The new version activates automatically on a slope, but the bike now starts off no differently to normal, so the only way you know it is working is that you don't have to hold the brake when on a slope. Very civilised - so long as it doesn't lock itself on one day!
  43. 5 points
    When I were a youf Honda were seen as bulletproof reliability but a bit soulless. BMW were seen as ultra high quality but a bit weird. Yamaha were like Honda but a bit lairy. Suzukis were built down to a price and had paint only one molecule thick and Kawasaki were the same only with insane power but none of these were necessarily true. My V Strom had a better finish to it than my CBF 1000 while the Versys was the epitome of sensible for instance. I think perceptions change over time as well. Triumph are now putting themselves out there as a premium brand and if you look at the specs that might be true. Ducati are marketing themselves as being Germanic in quality (owned by Audi, electronics by Bosch) so at the end of the day when I am looking for a new bike I judge it on real world reviews (Nathan Millward for example), test rides, and what I can find out about the bike. Over the years I have learned the questions to ask and the things that I need to look for - which might be different for other people. It is annoying that I still haven't found the perfect bike though I've got close!
  44. 5 points
    Andy that's how you choose a hedge trimmer or a new kettle not a bike The process should absolutely be; see something that looks great, heart rate goes up, do some brief research (totally ignoring any on line forum thoughts on mpg, how the indicator switches feel, the horn sounds or any other meaningless drivel) find one on the Bay of Fleas and if the owner sounds half honest and knowledgeable then a haggle a bit off and buy it. No need to go near a salesperson or dealership, in most cases they add a sum total of zero to the process unless you need smoke blown up an orifice
  45. 5 points
  46. 5 points
    Yeah, but they’re both tossers..
  47. 5 points
    If what your riding makes YOU happy that’s all that matters and sod anyone else’s image of it. As I have said before if someone slags off my choice of bike I just tell them “You sign the cheque for the next one and you can choose it”
  48. 5 points
    Auto blippers are fun! Then, after about 10 miles, become boring.. They’re part of the ‘performance obsession’ that create road bikes that would have won a Moto GP race ten years ago and are, for the most part, bought by people can’t hope to ever run one to it’s maximum. That would be 99% of us.. The quick shift is connected to the gear lever and kills the ignition ignition for a nanosecond when you change up (clutchless) which means you can hold the throttle wide open and not interrupt the drive to the rear wheel for more than is absolutely necessary. It’s worth a couple of tenths of a second a lap in a race. Not sure what it’s worth on the B276? The auto blipper is run through the same software as allows you to close the throttle on the way into a bend and (again, without using the clutch) just tread down through the gears. The auto blip raises the revs to match the road speed so the gears slide in smoothly. The technology is wonderful and it’s huge fun to just jab at the controls like a moron and have the bike sort the mess out. Is it ‘progress’? I suppose so. Racers like it. Which means racer wannabes ‘must have’ it. And will pay handsomely for the privilege. The ultimate quick shift is (obviously) DCT but you’re not allowed to race those so they’ll never catch on..
  49. 5 points
    Arhh , that’ll be a good combo Chinese metal and Italian wiring.:0))
  50. 5 points
    The red is too much like the red on the Crossrunner. There is also the fact that the official nickname of Spurs is The Lillywhites.😀 Now that’s got me thinking maybe Lilly would be a good name for it.
This leaderboard is set to London/GMT+01:00
×