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  1. Tex

    Tex

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  2. Rocker66

    Rocker66

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  3. PoppetM

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 21/03/18 in all areas

  1. 10 points
    I have always had maxi scooters until the Integra, and in a lot of ways prefer them. My first was an X9 250 with the Honda engine then an X9 500 which I still have and in between I have had a Nexus, another X9 500 and a Yamaha T-Max and at one point a Kawasaki GTR1000. Servicing is expensive if you use a dealer/garage, but the actual task is probably simpler than on a motorbike so even less technically minded owners could probably do their own. There are advantages to scooters in that you have no constant maintenance like chain oiling as 99% of parts once fitted just work until they need changing and have no adjustment to make in between. Apart from a sat nav holder and power supply, you probably don't need accessories as they have all the gadgets built in. Even a electro hydraulic centre stand on the X9. The reason I still have the original X9 500 from 2004 is that it is brilliant. There is no corrosion apart from a bit of tarnish on a few bolt heads and some p-clips, everything works, it's comfortable, quick enough, reasonably economical and I can strip it down and rebuild it nut and bolt every few years and it's as good as new again. In 70,000 miles I have replaced the regulator and water pump once, steering bearings, thermostat twice and the rest are the wear items like tyres brake pads each of which last around 5-6000 miles. The T-max suffered horrendous corrosion, the wheels peeled, the brakes seized, the discs tarnished and wore badly the front exhaust pipe rusted and the fancy trick matt black paint peeled off the fairing. The Nexus gave no bother apart from water pump seals but I couldn't get on with the poor weather protection so swapped it for a second X9 500 as a project as the dealer couldn't get it started - took me an hour. Comparably the Integra isn't fairing well either, the rear shocker looks tatty after only 19,000 miles, the brake callipers look very 'used' and all the little brackets that hold wiring or pipes everywhere on the bike are rusty, the engine casing refuses to stay silver and goes white and spotty no matter what protection you spray on it and generally you have to spend a lot more time and effort into cleaning and fettling, plus all parts are expensive. Out of the two it's probably the one that will get traded in or just sold. Maxi scooters, not trad metal bodied types, do need to be stripped down and fettled every few years to prevent unseen problems masked by body panels, but nothing different than an Integra plus with a decent top box plus the underseat storage and the curry hook you can carry a lot of 'stuff'. You do have to ride them within their design limits though, if you try to hustle them along like a motorcycle, they will tip you off, they lean over further for the same radius curve possibly due to the lower CofG and smaller wheels so they ground out easier, the smaller wheels don't like pot holes and the simpler suspension hates rough rippled surfaces but knowing this and adjusting to it still makes an enjoyable ride. Compromise between the two, scooter and motorcycle like the Integra, and you lose all the benefits of both, but Suzuki probably hit the spot with the Burgman 650 where they made a scooter with all the gadgets even a heated seat and electric screen, that performed like a good mid range motorcycle but gave all the advantages of a scooter. Too expensive though, always was.
  2. 9 points
    In the interests of inclusion I have found an adaption that will allow Rocker to retain the macho biker image after scooters take over the world. I think we can all agree its inspired.
  3. 9 points
    CB650F? That’s the faired version of Sue’s bike? Very pretty machine. I have been tempted by one myself. Tony, I love the ‘cheese sandwich’ thinking. I got told off in another thread for NC ‘bashing’ (despite my liberal use of smileys) so am wary of going there again. I don’t knock the NC, I could ride one to the end of my days and not need anything more. But that’s not enough to stop me wanting more. The current object of my affections really has no more power or performance than an NC, but I much prefer the way it feels. And, most importantly, the way it makes me feel. Unlike the commuters, I, personally, have no real reason for a motorcycle as a tool anymore. So if it ain’t fun I don’t bother. Peace & love boys and girls.
  4. 9 points
    well, the new bike has been collected. Ive only ridden it home from the dealers. It rides great and seems manageable for me.
  5. 9 points
    Love mine, very pleased with it, a good trail bike, an OK road bike, not quick, but quick enough and plenty good enough for a big solo trip. But don't take my word for it, read Steph Jeavons blog, "one Steph beyond" she's just finished riding round the world for four years on a CRF 250l, with very few problems with the bike http://www.stephmoto-adventurebikeblog.com/ They are a good price of kit, just get the rear preload cranked up to about 3/4 of the travel, it helps a bit. Apart from that, just ride and enjoy. temping picture alert.........
  6. 8 points
    Finally done some fork protectors on the printer for my NC750x. I do have a completely blank version that I could add text or images to for a custom design. The white is just vinyl wrap as it was quicker than painting it. Still needs a little tidying to get rid of tiny hair like stray bits
  7. 8 points
    Sheesh, I wish my weight was.......
  8. 8 points
    Phew... Thought for a minute someone had started a thread to discuss not wearing underwear
  9. 8 points
    I'll try to convince you that they are pony , underpowered foreign built tut , how we doing so far ? If you test ride one your balls will fall off and you will go bald and get a big belly . ( that should do it ) 😀 oh forgot this one . You will smell of cats 😂😂😂😂
  10. 8 points
    Wheeley bins can protect your bike, if not your dignity. During the Winter of discontent, in 1979, I crashed my plastic maggot and bent the front forks. Having straightened them by the normal process of jumping on them when the two ends were supported by blocks of wood, I rebuilt the forks, re-assembled the front end but made one crucial error, I didn't set the handlebars correctly but thought nothing of it. I then jumped on the maggot for a test ride. What has this to do with wheelie bins you may ask? Well they wern't around then and black bags were the only option. They held all sorts of assorted rubbish and there had been no collections for a few weeks. due to the binmans' strike. So, on the test ride I came to my first corner and had a huge moment when I found the bars would not allow me, (or things felt so weird that my little brain told me something was wrong ) to turn properly and I ran wide on the corner, onto the pavement with a wicked two foot low wall in front. At any other time I would have hit the wall, somersaulted over it and damage would have occurred. But this wall was lined with black rubbish bags, a sort of early air safety barrier and I ended up more smelly than previously but safe and sound. However black plastic bags and hot exhaust tubes are the marriage made in heaven so I spent the next few days scraping off the even more smelly plastic from the exhausts. My flatmate on his new CB650f couldn't stop laughing and my maggot was officially christened the Rubbish bike. I kept that one for a long time, clocking up over 80,000 miles, but bought a CB900f for weekends, just to beat my flatmate. The moral of these stories, rubbish collection receptacles are better for motorbikes than brick walls!
  11. 8 points
    It's not just suspension though, with some types of people it applies to anything. If you have a £3000 Gibson guitar it will make you a better player. If you have a set of expensive clubs it will make you a better golfer. If you have the best suspension it will make as good as a moto GP rider................It doesn't. There's a guy who gigs in one of my local pubs, he plays a Chinese made Squire Strat that cost £170, I know because I have one exactly the same. He can make it sing, unfortunately there seems to be something wrong with mine..............
  12. 7 points
    Until aged stiffness grabbed me I used both, but now it's only ever a Topbox only. Getting the right boot over panniers had become increasingly difficult but the Topbox is not a problem. I wish it was the reverse because then I would fit my Give E21 panniers from my Buell onto the NC to fill in the visual void over the rear wheel. Old ladies (plenty of them in my circle of friends) frequently ask why that void is there and my answer is that it's because the craze now is to use a single suspension unit in preference to a pair of side mounted ones. For normal road use there is nothing wrong with twin units and it makes a lot of volume available for other things which a central unit would occupy. A side mounted unit, as some bikes still have, makes good space-sense but then the swing-arm needs to be beefier to cope with the eccentric forces. A trade-off as always. After years struggling with stuff trying to fall out of side-opening panniers I went to top loaders. Much easier to get watertight and easier to get at the contents. Topboxes share those advantages but place the load less favourably. Along comes the Frunk. The Frunk on the NC bikes is brilliant for me nowadays. As well as being convenient, it places the load centrally and quite low. For my day-rides it holds all I need, including a one litre vacuum flask standing upright, and there is still volume to spare. This is what I carry in the Frunk: A few carefully selected tools wrapped in a rag. Tubeless tyre repair kit and additional bottles. Small first aid kit and part of a toilet roll. Swiss Army knife. Disc lock and warning cable. Helmet lock with cable. Wet cloth in a container and small towel for visor cleaning. Two-piece rain oversuit. (I always wear a two-piece leather suit.) Area map and reading glasses. Sunhat or beany. Thermos. Lunch. Phone.
  13. 7 points
  14. 7 points
    I took the NC in for a new chain to be fitted this morning, and whilst waiting, took this nice little thing out. I'm smitten, it feels like a very powerful NC but with lots of toys. You loose the DCT, but gain cruise control (which would be great for my arthritic right wrist). Also, how have I managed all my motorcycling life with a heated seat? Now just the slight problem of persuading the wife that I need £12000 (plus cost of luggage). There could be some heated negotiations tonight!
  15. 7 points
    While Kelly was at the gym yesterday it gave me an opportunity to have a "proper" ride. Took half a turn of preload off the forks which has reduced the slightly jolty ride at the front. If I was to ride any distance solo I'd do the same at the rear as Ethel seems to be a little oversprung for someone of my (low) weight - easily adjusted though like I said. Obviously I'm still respecting the fact that I've covered just shy of 300 miles but I also "explored" the upper reaches of the rev range yesterday. The power delivery is extremely linear (obviously without the initial arm-wrenching torque of the HD big twin) There is an initial pull which makes 2nd gear starts a doddle followed by a progressive push as the rpm builds. This is accompanied by a delicious induction noise which is a bit addictive at wider throttle openings. Not wanting to mollycoddle the motor too much I've been very progressively working it a little as part of the bedding in process. Same for the brakes, though to be honest haven't needed any and just get better and better. I'm getting used to cancelling indicators again and quite honestly prefer it as the HD could occasionally get confused. Handling-wise the CB reminds me of bikes from my earlier years with plenty of feedback but needing careful blending of throttle to keep an appropriate bank angle. This is quite different to the HD or even the NC which both had a gentle pendum-like quality with their low C of G. The CB thus rewards appropriate riding skills. My initial thoughts about it being an excellent beginners bike might need a little adjustment here. It IS a heavy bike and tips so easily into a bend that a little caution is needed in order to not overdo it. Of course, I need to bear in mind that I've had less than an hour riding solo on the CB and the dynamics are totally different to two-up riding as you might imagine. Seat is a bit 'ard but I think we've probably been spoiled by the armchair comfort of the Low Rider (or even the Shad on the NC if we're honest). Cleaning. There's a lot to clean obviously but it's a delight to do so. Everything is relatively easy to get at (barring the underside of the front mud guard). The lacquered finish of the alloy rims and stainless spokes means even the potentially fiddly job of the wheels is instantly rewarding as dirt just wipes off. I'm definitely going to purchase a hydraulic bike lift to save my knackered knees from any more abuse. The bike bubble (reviewed elsewhere) has been a very worthwhile investment. Ok, I could've bought a cheap shed for less money but we don't want any more "clutter" on our small back yard and the bike bubble packs away so easily into the existing tool shed. That's all for now folks. Loving the new bike more than any recent ones. Like the Dyna it's a "heart" bike. Unlike the Harley though there isn't the all-pervading feeling of having to "belong" which we found a little uncomfortable. Kelly and I have to honestly admit we're not "Harley" people. Incidentally a few weeks ago we encountered some verbal abuse from a biker near Matlock who thought it clever to impress his mates having spotted a lone Harley rider without the usual group.
  16. 7 points
    Loaded the baby GS up yesterday, box full, pannier's full and the good lady on the back. First time she had sat on the bike and the first time it's been loaded so we went for a 50 mile shakedown to see how we all performed. TBH even though it's a snug fit everything was fine, ok it was only 50 miles and in 3 weeks it will be Plymouth for the ferry but no complaints on the performance or comfort front and nothing fell off. Tank range is about 140 miles so stopping every 100 for fuel and a bum break will hopefully keep us in good order. I must admit my main concern now is bike reliability after reading all the adverse comments about BMW elsewhere on the forum, just hope I have not dived in to soon and bought a model that still needs the faults finding and sorting. One thing is for sure I will be taking a list of UK and Spanish dealers and phone numbers with me. I have ridden extensively in many countries but have very little experience on two wheels in Spain, any tips, thoughts or suggestions are welcome.
  17. 7 points
    Ive got a nissan leaf, 120 mile range, fast charge points all over the country now. 100 mile charge in 30 mins. Ive never found it a problem. Home charge is a doddle and paid for by nissan, and my elecy bill hasn't gone up. I certainly dont miss petrol stations.
  18. 7 points
    I don’t smoke seldom drink these days and no longer go to The Lane so I might as well as well spent my spare money on motorcycling. I worked long hours for it so might as well enjoy it. No point in being the richest man in the graveyard.
  19. 7 points
    I find the NC fun as I have not ridden anything in all my time riding above 500cc, it gives me a kick, but if you have ridden more powerful bikes in the past then I can see why you would think that
  20. 7 points
    Well I've just gone back to the NC after near on 8 years of commuting on a scooter, various bikes before that. Several reasons one was cost of servicing, I can service a bike, have built 5 frame up re-builds but the scooter is a pita to do yourself (mind you those NC panels..). Last scooter was an Xmax 400 and honestly hated it, even around town, the hour test drive was fine but its too long, wide and heavy for every day use. Also the front end always felt like it was about to give way. Motorways are tiring and nothing left in it to make a pass if needed. In real terms probably not much in cost of the actual service but at every 3k miles and then belt at 12 i cant say its annual ownership was cheap. If your going for a maxi scooter take one for a decent period and a long ride then decide. On the plus definitely better weather protection with a skirt on. Honestly chuffed to bits with the NC DCT.
  21. 7 points
    My SH300 has the same service intervals as the NC. 8000 miles with valves due at 16000. Belt replacement at 16000 is comparable to cost of chain and sprockets, access ease the same really as a chain bike with time taken with bits you have to remove. No need to remove plastics for servicing, it has a front cover for the valves which although shim you can pull to one side for changes. Tax is a lot cheaper due to smaller engine size. Mine does aroundund 85mpg. Easy to keep clean, not so many nooks and crannies plus it seems to get less dirty anyway as the grotty bits are enclosed. My smaller Suzuki Address 110 cc scoot has service with oil and valves every 2500. Easy to do and again no plastics to remove as it has an easy front cover and bath tub design. But if you weren't up to doing it yourself it could be pricey with services every 2500K. Belt is at 14K I think, not sure. Happy at 55mph, more than that is a bonus but never guaranteed! Round town or weaving between traffic its hard to beat a scooter imho. Weather protection and storage are excellent plus the SH300 will sit at 80 on the motorway with no buffet and not much wind noise from the higher screen. Easy 2 up as well but does get a bit sluggish loaded and a bit tippy on corners if you are going slow if loaded. Over the rough stuff its comparable to the NC which isn't fabulous suspension as we all know. You will end up dodging potholes a bit as its less forgiving than a motorbike generally. Cant scrape pegs but you can scrape the centrestand They aren't better than bikes, just different. Some things they are better at others less so. Biggest downside I would say is maintaining a steady speed in speed limits, the CVT sounds much the same at 45 as it does at 30, can creep up. Around the twisties I can ride the 300 as fast as I did the NCX but it doesnt feel quite as steady. You aren't quite as 'connected' to the road if that makes sense? Other downside is people love pulling out in front of you, maybe they are afraid of getting stuck behind a slow scooter. On the 300 I usually just blat past them.
  22. 7 points
    You don't want a CRF Lloyd, they kill your sex life due to the vibrations in the nether regions!
  23. 7 points
    Just changed the tyres on the CRF250, they have to be tubed whatever (no beads). At least it was easy to do at home. Good to know I'm still cool after all these years😎 And the C90's got spokes, how cool is that, I could be a cure for global warming at this rate.⛄️ Tubists, we scoff in the face of danger, we are the last warriors of ancient times, bravely riding from coffee shop to coffee shop. We were the future.....once (just the once) Er..that's enough for now, now where are my pills.
  24. 6 points
  25. 6 points
    I can think of many words to describe that and I can assure you that inspired is not one of them😂😂
  26. 6 points
    Hi Guys Well I tried one today. Although I was impressed with the weather protection and the cruising speed, 70mph for a 250 trail bike is pretty good, I found the engine a little flat. Very relaxed and comfy riding position but it didn't really float my boat but what I came away with is, my NC is a great bike, but it needs a better screen. As mentioned the weather protection on the rally was brill. Thanks all for your feedback Lloyd
  27. 6 points
    In the interest of balance I'm probably going to get nitrous fitted to my superduke 👍
  28. 6 points
    Just had my CRF250 Rally serviced to day. 8000 mile service, £89.85. Pretty happy with that. I spent an hour walking around the dealership, we all know how dangerous that can be. As regards a new bike, I just have two words....... Ducati Scrambler. The new ones, the Cafe Racer and the Desert Sled. Ooh nurse they are lovely. If I wasn't a poor pensioner these days, I would have definitely ordered one of them, probably the Desert Sled😍. Slim, light, good looking and great real world power. But enough about me 😂 In my reckless days I might have ordered both, and the pre reg'd ones on the dealers floor would still have been cheaper than a New GS. Write out 1000 times "I must leave the credit card at home"😇
  29. 6 points
    675cc Triple has more poke than both, who would have thought that?!
  30. 6 points
    There are some bikes I could mention, where I'd sit on it and admire the bucket.
  31. 6 points
    On our J300 once, a bloke on a dirt bike pulled alongside for a good look, nodded appreciatively then took off like the wind until it threw it's chain like a snake. We ducked just in time. The J300 looked very non-scooter from the front, we used to get quite a few nods from sportsbikers till they passed by wishing they could take it back
  32. 6 points
    I had a Triumph Sprint GT , 128 bhp, I had a Triumph Trophy 1215 SE for 2 years , 132 bhp, I currently have a BMW R1150RT, 95 bhp. None of the above bikes gave me as much pleasure as the NC750X. The NC is the quickest from stop up to 40mph. 40 -70 can make it sweat a bit, but I have learnt to ride the NC DCT in a very aggressive way if required. I never liked the Sprint, quick but I just didnt like the dials and the general setup. The Trophy was awesome, quick and a beast, but not a flingable as the NC, also like riding a jet engined barn door, compared to the lithe NC. The RT, is a great bike, plods on and and can be quick, but 70+ on the beemer doesnt feel anywhere as good as the NC. I personally dont get why people think the NC is underpowered, it depends how you ride it. I have to admit that apart from my Sprint, I have never had a sport bike nor would I want one. But the NC is far from boring.
  33. 6 points
    This isn't helping me. During the summer I may well be looking to replace one of my scoots with a naked style bike. Liking the Kawasaki Z300 but I might look like a pimple on a drum. I like the new CB300 as well. I could go larger, but its not speed and power that do it for me. Fair play to Rocker in going after what his heart is searching for. If you don't have to settle for purely practical get what makes you smile and look forward to the ride. I love my scoots but they don't entirely fill the gap left by a motorbike.
  34. 6 points
    It gets complicated as shown below The CBF650 as owned by Bonekicker now superceeded (His was yellow) Sue'S CB650F CBR650F the one I want to test
  35. 6 points
    Believe me I'm more than well aware of the Hornet Sue had one of the first in the country as the dealer let her have hers the day before they were actually released as it was her birthday. She then became one of the founder members of The Hornets Nest. Her first one was written off so she replaced with another which was to become much modified and well known on the Nest as Little Insect
  36. 6 points
    I reckon it's a CB650F ? Is the ashtray full on the X? 😋
  37. 6 points
    It's a shame that what we ride suddenly becomes determined by our ailments or limted abilities, there are so many bikes out there i would love to own and ride but know i don't have a chance due to physical difficulties.
  38. 6 points
    I no longer buy hard copy magazines but have the app readly, look it up, you get most of the monthlies including Bike and Classic Bike as well as loads of Yankee stuff and MCN. That's only part of the Automobile section so I won't even mention Playboy or Woman's Own, and all for a tenner a month. I know it's not the same as reading the mag, but it's a hell of a lot cheaper and I am no longer adding to my stack of mags under the bed or in the loft.
  39. 6 points
  40. 6 points
    Indeed sir, that and it takes you longer to get back from far away places, thus reducing the "opportunities".
  41. 6 points
    That's done it, she's ordering one .
  42. 6 points
    Mmm, listening do go on.... Two out of three, how perceptive....... Never happened, still a good effort and a persuasive but ultimately failed attempt. Even if all that did happen, it's still worth it😁😁😁😁😁😁
  43. 6 points
    Will Young???? Stephen Stills of CSN&Y might disagree....
  44. 5 points
    It does with guitars. I only ever had three out to use at any one time with another 12 or so in the loft in their hard cases. Every so often I'd swap them round. As long as when buying a new one you don't go for a radically different colour you'll be fine. I covered that by having natural wood, black and dark sunburst. It worked for years then the wheels came off when we moved house and I had to get them all onto the van.........
  45. 5 points
    I had an MZ in the loft for 8 years. I was only found out when I put 3 on the auction site and the wife said I'd got the advert wrong. Just buy the same colour every time, or get caught buying spray cans, then deny everything. Andy
  46. 5 points
    Sounds a bit daft, but its the somewhat liberating feeling of being on a naked bike, no protection from wind but leant forward enough that its manageable. No practical reason at all, just that feeling you get. Can't really explain it. The scoot is 80% perfect, its that little 20% which a bike is better at but 80% of the time makes it impractical. I suppose its that small intersection between toy and utility that no bike or scooter fully gets to. The scoot for me is closer to that than the NC was and its difficult justifying that 20% the toy sits in the garage doing nothing. Some folks on here are fortunate to fill those niches with different bikes, hard to do with two and impossible with one. If I use words like compromise or practicality the Scoot wins every time, I just want the cake and eat it So I am in no rush to change my outlook, but will keep an eye on the for sale section for a bike thats reasonably priced to fill that 'toy' requirement. Still a scooterist, just like a little walk on the dark side now and again.
  47. 5 points
    Well that was very easy. No problems taking off the black panel behind the front wheel. I don’t think one of the ht caps was fitted properly after the service. anyway cleaned everything up and all seems to be running well. Engine sprayed with a jet washer and no miss firing. Thanks embee and viva integra
  48. 5 points
    Thanks for the replies folks, I understand most of the do's and don'ts I have been standing in a few dealers and shops looking like Big Ed and feeling daft whilst standing and walking around shop floors with helmets on. I can fit in small and medium with no real difference in feel between the two sizes, no pressure points or discomfort so I'm probably best with a small. But now if the helmet has too much movement it's bad as it may come off, but not enough movement and that's bad as my head will rotate too much with the helmet..., any way here's a pic of me in various dealers and shops this week tying helmets, stood doing nothing....,
  49. 5 points
    The bedtime prayers of every right thinking child.. ”God bless mummy, God bless daddy and God bless John Bloor”
  50. 5 points
    I know that looks are a very subjective thing and we all have different taste but for me the XS2 was one of the nicest looking bikes around at the time
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