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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 29/04/17 in all areas

  1. 15 likes
    this minter is living in the house, the wife is well chuffed.
  2. 14 likes
    My C70 just finished it and wait on the V5 30 years in a shed, i dragged it out after i sold all my running bikes in January ..I have a Lifan 110 to go in it after the MOT.
  3. 13 likes
    Just as a follow up to my last thread on farkling the GS - I've now modified a set of Shad pannier mounts and frames to make use of the space liberated by fitting a low level exhaust. I've had to buy a set of the SH36 panniers for fitting purposes as the new design SH35 panniers with aluminium outer panels have been delayed - so will have a set of SH36s to sell at some point if anyone is interested. These were ex-demo items and came with a set of mounting frames for the Yamaha MT-09, and very fortuitously these frames were much easier to modify for the new positioning on the GS than the ones that came in the GS fitting kit, so I only used the top brackets from that. With the original Shad GS fittings and the high level exhaust the panniers come out as 115 cm wide compared with the next widest part which is the hand guards on the bars which are 98 cm. With the mods I have made the overall width is now 101 cm, so only about 15 mm wider than the bars on each side. The new SH35 panniers look significantly flatter and slimmer in shape than the SH36, though they are supposed to have the same 36 litre capacity, so with a bit of luck once these are fitted the width will probably be no more than the 98 cms of the bars. I've made up some additional bits to attach the frames to the top brackets, and also to fit a pair of tool tubes, so the whole lot will be going off to be stripped and powder coated next week. In the meantime here are a few pics. With unmodified mounts (and my temporary £20 top box!) - 115 cm wide: Does my bum look big in these? (Perspective effect makes this look a lot wider than bars but they aren't.)
  4. 9 likes
    Best biking experience, if not necessarily my best bike, was back in the early eighties when I bought my CX500 brand new, and decided to take a solo tour around France, as not only my first bike tour, but also my first trip to Europe of any description. I got off the overnight Portsmouth to Le Havre ferry at about 6 AM and started riding south. There was early morning mist but the sun was starting to break through, and then the Pont de Tancarville came into view rising out of the mist with the sun glinting off its towers. Later I stopped at a cafe for a breakfast of cafe au lait with bread and jam, with the coffee served in one of those huge cups you used to get in France. The sheer foreignness and novelty of everything, from the food to the road signs, was just intoxicating. In a way I regret that France is now so familiar to me that the excitement of the unfamiliar is reduced, but I still love riding there. Picture below was from my next tour the following year when the poor CX was loaded up with two people, luggage and camping gear:
  5. 9 likes
    Not a bad idea but have you forgotten what a lifesaver/shoulder check is Frank? I once got complacent and didn't bother and nearly went into a car just like as you described. I gave myself a stern talking to and have always checked since, always do them in the car too.
  6. 9 likes
    1979 December I'm fitting a full exhaust on a Wolsley Six so I can get to work that afternoon, the whole lot needed replacing after numerous bodges to keep me mobile. Almost finished with two hours left, I was laid in the snow on my back by the side of the road ( got to get to work later that afternoon) with cold icy water running down my spine from the slush. All I had left to do was secure the pipe to the manifold clamp which is low down at the back between the engine and fire wall. Just two bolts, two nuts and spring washers and a gasket. I didn't have enough clearance to see it as I'm laid under the car which is sitting on ramps at the front. Half an hour trying to get this #*"*®π nut to start turning . Get on you ~*"#¥> . I was freezing cold and my hands are so numb, I'm trying to thread the nut on my finger end . 🤡
  7. 8 likes
    With a bit of time on my hands I managed some test rides today so a quick overview of my initial impressions. X-Adv. Surprised how big it is in the flesh, acres of angular plastic but well put together and some nice touches. Not a fan of keyless systems but then I do suffer from key paranoia! It works well and the dash start up proccess is impressive. So how do you mount it? Leg through, no chance so leg over it is, very wide seat felt awkward for me but I'm used to NC X and even taller CRF1000 with narrow seats. The X-Adv feels quite heavey lifting off the side stand, more so than the 750 X and again it feels very wide. Start up and she sounds good, very familiar NC sound, engage D and off we go. Straight away I'm struggling to find somewhere my feet feel comfortable but bear in mind I've never owned or ridden for any amount of time any type of scooter. On the road the motor feels it has more low and mid range grunt, very smooth, gear changes immaculate. Still struggling to get comfortable but the ride is plush on it's suspenders, turns in nicely and feels very stable, touched down the hero blob on the centre stand! Ooops! I'm no riding god! Really like the dash and the screen does a good job, easily adjusted and level 3 for me. Out on a dual carriageway the motor runs out of puff a bit over 75 ish but I have just ridden up on the CRF so may be a bit unfair on it. So a quick 20 minute ride but I cannot get on with the riding position, sure others will and I can see where the money has gone into it. CBR1000RR-SP Another 10k will buy you this. Very small and felt like a 600RR. This SP with it's Ohlins suspension soaks up anything you throw at it, very comfy or very racey you choose. It's faster than a fast thing with a rocket up its a#se. That's all I can say about it really, riding on normal roads it felt a bit pointless with all the power and gizmos, all in all didn't feel anything for it, it does what it does. CBR650F Riding straight after the FireBlade I thought it would feel gutless but it's not, it makes more sense in the real world, riding ergonomics are better (I'm old) and it has plenty of grunt, the revised suspension felt good but obviously not in the Blade Ohlins league. I really like it and in red it's a stunning looking thing, a mini Blade for a third of the money.
  8. 7 likes
    Lovely little silent film about early motorcycle manufacturing techniques. Enjoy.
  9. 7 likes
    Exactly. Regardless of the level, if the oil has just been changed it should look clear and bright, either golden yellow or red depending on what they use, but definitely not shi**y brown/black crud like that. Looks like someone has simply added a load of new oil without draining the old out.
  10. 7 likes
    Well, 36 hrs after starting to fit my spots eventually finished... at 10pm tonight! Ok, I had a few breaks for coffee, Britains Got Talent, Sunday Lunch and a hundredth birthday party. I even sacrificed watching Casualty and was in the garage til almost midnight last night. Soooooooooo... what went wrong?! What went right !!! I made sure I had all the bits I required, including the spotlights! I had wire, fuse, terminals, switch, mounting brackets etc. I didn't rush (as you can probably tell) as i wanted to do a proper job! First off, why is it that the screws and nuts and bolts that you need to remove are always so damn tight that you start off damaging the heads! I checked the wiring to the tail light and spliced into this to get my live feed and ran the cable with inline fuse back to the frunk. , Fitted the switch on the handlebars and the mounting clamps on the front forks. By the time i rushed in for Britains Got Talent I had fitted the spots and was well chuffed. All I had left to do was some soldering and connecting the lights in to the wires I had fed in. I was eager to get back into the garage and did so straight after BGT and my curry. Lights connected, checks carried out, job done... or so i thought ! Lights worked a treat and looked brilliant. Moving bike back into garage I noticed... lights were catching radiator when on full lock !! A few choice words followed by contemplating if it was a problem or cause any harm.! thought it best to sleep on it and consider my options! First thing this morning lights were off and I was trying to come up with options. Got some aluminium profile and made a bracket to go under headlight held by the fork mounting brackets. Job now done and I feel satisfied that I did it all myself, but a job I thought would only take about 4 hours... Will try and post some pics cause I am so proud (and i know my Mum would be too) !
  11. 7 likes
    Then you need to view some of my, most desirable, 'classics'. They're all out, standing in their field. No, I mean 'outstanding in their field' that's it! Incidentally, 'they' don't consider 'possessions' when assessing your ability to pay for your old age care. You can have a vintage Rolls Royce and a pristine E Type Jaguar and they don't give a shit. But if you have a little 3 bed semi? Tough! You're 'self funding'. Take me a tip from me, flog the house, buy some Manx Nortons (no V5 on a racer, see?) and plead poverty.
  12. 7 likes
    Most of it won't fit anything made after 1969 - it's going to last forever!!
  13. 7 likes
    Looking at Larryblaggs post with regard to comfort on his VN900, it got me spending the evening looking at Cruisers. On the VN1500 you have to drop the engine to adjust the valves on the rear cylinder as the frame stops you lifting off the cover for the rear cylinder head, really. ! Then I looked at the now no longer made Victory V90C 1500 compared to the large displacement H D. ( Pre V Rod ) The Victory was a bit frumpy looking but looks comfortable for rider and passenger and it makes 80 BHP . On the face of it the early Victory win's the USA made cruiser war hands down. Victory makes more power than HD. Victory is OHC and hydraulic adjustment. Not push rod as is HD. Victory primary drive is gear driven, not chain as is HD. Victory stator is outboard not inboard of the motor where it's hot as is HD. Victory belt drive can be changed easily unlike HD. Victory is air oil cooled the HD is air only. Victory has 6 quarts of oil sloshing around the engine the Harley has only 3 quarts. The Victory has only 6 gaskets or o rings in the entire engine, the HD has 36. The Victory runs at 70 psi oil pressure the HD runs at 3 psi hot. The Victory has solid con rods, the HD has hollowed ones. So the Victory is a more reliable lump then, ...er no. I then learned the Victory had fuel pump issues resulting in a recall of all bikes for replacement (often) It has throttle body sealing issues as the body sits on top of the engine causing running, fueling problems. It has fuel tee connection and pipe issues . ( Made in UK sadly.) It has loom problem in early 1999,2001 bikes and the ECU chip fails. It has stator and rec issues as not designed large enough to keep the battery charged. It has a gear box that drops 3rd gear. On 99 to 2001 engines. It had a redesign in 2002 that fixed that problem but gained a new one as a large batch of incorrectly heat treated third gear cogs was fitted to machines so the cog strips it's self at 20K. This does not effect all machines made 2002 / 2003 but does a high proportion. 2003 they then sorted that out and had to beef up the final drive sprocket with a Cush drive due transmission lash and had to redesign the rear belt sprocket as belts broke. In early engines 1999 to 2001 the crank positioning sensor was located on top of the engine case but is inside the engine case, so if it went pig you split the case to change it out and on later ones it's on the out side where it's easy to get at. Polaris who made Victory and still make Indian will continue to make spares for ten years for the Victory "freedom" engines but 1999 to 2003 pre "freedom" engines are hard to get parts for now. The goodish news is most of the later transmission bits will retro fit, but are very expensive. Then I looked at the " boring" NC common problems. The seat is uncomfortable. Some tyres screech when new. The screen does not suit everyone. Made I laugh 😁
  14. 7 likes
    I know this sounds patronising and others have said this before, but it won't be many rides before you think of the earplug sensation as normal and if you ever then have to ride even a mile down to the shops without them you will be horrified. At least thats been my experience. Mike
  15. 7 likes
    May I refer you to your very own signature.
  16. 7 likes
    The reason i bought the Lifan motor: when i first started the c70 engine after it's 30 year lay up rings had stuck at the bottom of the piston, they broke, so it started to let out the magic smoke ( i thought Lucas had made it ) then i switched off and it did not have enough compression to start again. DD a guy on the C90 forum said to me " if they have 161 lbs of compression they with run well, if they have 160lbs they WILL run, if they 159 they want run". I had 60lbs PSI on it after the rings broke. Tried to get rings or piston kit but not available from the people i spoke to including Honda and David Silvers, only option was a new motor as said at £200-ish so that is what i did, but i never stopped looking for a piston kit. Then after i had got the bike back together i found a company in the far east who had the correct size piston/rings but the piston was flat top and not a domed piston, nothing wrong with the Honda piston only the rings, so i bought the piston and waited 5 weeks for it to arrive. The postage was three times the price of the piston, Trevor ( stores man ) in my dealer let loose in the store room to find a set of points and a condenser and a gasket set...£10 for the lads tea club Honda gasket set retail is around £70 Chinese about £9..So as Mark sys re: the motor in 110cc form, better for real world riding so after the MOT in may get the Lifan transplant. The C70 is 6volt ( and peeps think the new NC has crap lights so the Lifan is 12 volts, i have all the kit to convert it CDI/ reg/rec coil light bulbs, the few extra wires that will be needed to go odd places have already been made up into a small harness and it will take a few mins to instal. The motor is held in with two bolts, i already have an exhaust to fit the 110cc motor as the C70 72cc inlet is around 20mm so the larger bore is needed. If the smaller unit is used they have this tendency to get rather HOT rather quickly in ffact they glow Red after 10 mins....More anon.
  17. 7 likes
    If that was my Missus, that would be her "happy" face....... Love the bike btw
  18. 6 likes
    Worry not, Mac. The British manufacturers weren't total idiots. The export models were different. Typically having higher bars, smaller tanks and skimpy (normally chrome) mudguards. But there was a 'downside'.. British riders (being human, after all) began to want what they couldn't have and clamoured for the 'glamorous' export bikes. "Ah ha!" Said the makers "Motorcyclists don't want weather protection, practicality and fuel range, they want 'bling'!!" And that's how we got to the situation we find ourselves in now.
  19. 6 likes
    Took my lovely Bonnie for my last trip on her to the dealers yesterday and came out with a Triumph Explorer for the journey home through a downpour with hailstones on the M4, no drama though the Explorer just got on with it and took me home in comfort. Photos to follow soon.
  20. 6 likes
    What I should have posted is, I know where there is a nice 1967 F reg BSA Thunderbolt. Andy.
  21. 6 likes
    Here she is then. Collected this morning.
  22. 6 likes
    I removed all the foam from my NC seat and started from the plastic base plate. Built up the seat in layers, with the hardest foam at the bottom, softer at the top. The layers are glued together using spray-on adhesive (which unfortunately ended up all over my dining chairs as well - thank god I'm not married). Then I used an electric carving knife to get it roughly to shape (the shape, incidentally, is totally different from the original and is cut to suit my own bum, which is enormous). After that I used a cheese grater (yes, honestly) to fine tune the shape and get a reasonable finish. Incidentally, I was able to make the section between my thighs when feet-down narrower than the original, so it's still easy to get my feet flat on the floor, despite the front part of the seat being significantly higher (it doesn't slope downwards, like the original, at all). Even the tiniest imperfection will show through the cover, so I then covered the whole thing in a layer of half-inch soft foam. The original cover was nowhere near big enough, so I bought some vinyl online (which looks almost identical to the original) and stretched it over. I bought plenty of vinyl because I knew I would need to refine the technique, and on the third go I was satisfied enough to put it back on the bike. There is one small wrinkle which I will fix next time I've got the seat off. About the stapler: you simply must use either a pneumatic one or - like me - an electric one. The manual ones are totally unsuitable. My electric one wasn't particularly expensive - less than £40, I think - but it puts those staples in a charm. It must draw a tremendous current for a very short time, because each time I triggered it I could see the lights in my extension dim for a brief moment. I would say the seat I've made is as good as it can be bearing in mind the constraints imposed by the size and shape of the seat pan. A perfect seat for me would go back a bit further. But it's certainly good enough that I no longer notice, or think about, the seat when riding, even after a couple of hours. The original made me uncomfortable almost straight away. The blue circles show the wrinkle which I will remove next time the seat comes off, and I will give those back corners a general tidy up.
  23. 6 likes
    So today was the day of the H-P's first oil change. Except the dealers only mechanic was taken suddenly on patternity leave. I believe you typically get about 9 months notice on this, but maybe not always. Their solution? Wait 3 weeks! I surprised myself as the toys stayed in the pram. No dummies were spat out. Maybe the excuse is better than many or I've just come to expect this sort of thing? Possibly 6 miles on the H-P to find a wasted journey just makes you think the next 6 miles can be ridden sooner? Anyhow, the drain plug must have dropped out while I was finding the garage key. It was lucky an old roasting tin was under the sump to avoid a lot of mess. Hot oil of course encourages Garage Frats, but I've trained them to change filters and sure enough the little ***s must have got in there. Seemed a shame not to just put fresh oil in at that point. Just having a cuppa then off to sort some wiring that was probably installed by someone more used to building suspension bridges or working on the national grid judging by the tension in the cable. Needless to say now I know how its done the dealer won't be seeing me again. Andy
  24. 6 likes
    It's been said before, but the Deauville in its various guises was a very underrated bike. Rather like the NC, it just does what it says, and it does it pretty well. No fuss, no frills, sliced white bread. I'm keeping mine, every time I ride it I remember why I keep it. A friend and touring associate has a 700 Deau, and has been looking/itching/scratching for a couple of years, but has come to the conclusion that his bike just does everything he needs so why throw several grand at something else just for the sake of it? In contrast I keep what I have and get another one to fill a gap in the garage. It's now full ................ or is it?
  25. 6 likes
    We used to have a train driver who when describing himself used to say " I'm the miserable old git in the corner that I used to moan about when I was a youngster" something I'm sure many of us can relate to. The warning sign is when you first find yourself uttering the words "In my day"
  26. 6 likes
    well simon, how much???? ,,,,,,lets say a fool and his money is easily parted. 3000 miles ,1996 model registered in 2003, then dry stored for 12 years, then 3000 dry sunny miles. Im in love. The wife will come round eventually.
  27. 5 likes
    Basically the same level of service poppet got from her dealer when I checked it over the day after the service too much oil (not changed ) dangerously tight drive chain and over inflated tyres - apart from that everything was fine ie they didnt touch anything else / should get better service from Honda believe she got a full refund
  28. 5 likes
    Fortunately, I don't have such an itchy affliction! I was cured in the 1980's when I bought a Suzuki GS850GT Shaft Drive. Much scorn and derision was put upon my Jap Crap by the local Brit Iron brigade. One weekend I had the misfortune to go out on a "run" with said crew, for a "proper burn-up" they said but mostly so they could continue to take the piss. It was like taking the dog for a walk. We had to stop at every bloody lamp post as they continually broke down in rotation! They'd all gather around, in a huddle, poking at the latest victim and muttering about "zener diodes", regapping points and cleaning spark plugs. You could easily plot our trail by the puddles of oil and discarded parts at the roadside. In seven hours we'd done twenty seven miles! I spent more money on cigarettes than petrol. Perhaps that's what they meant by a burn-up? When I was in the Army, we had some Norton Interpol bikes. I never ever saw one run, I only ever rode the Honda 750/4's that we (fortunately) also had! Things moved on for a reason! Anyway, get one as a nice ornament, if it floats your boat and you have the brass. Otherwise go to a museum or buy a magazine.
  29. 5 likes
    Fred it looks almost finished , so when are you selling it :0)
  30. 5 likes
    Proof positive that a medium capacity bike is all you really need. The CX was a simply brilliant road motorbike, far better than anything Honda make today imo.
  31. 5 likes
    My Deauville was left in for service amd MOT prep so I had an updated for 2017 BMW F800 GT out for a demo. A lovely light bike, enough power at 90bhp, a joy to ride. All the elctronic gizmos, riding modes, electronic suspension etc. etc. A fun bike in the twisties and frugal too. The only thing I wasn't keen on was the wind noise at 70mph, but then I'm used to screen and fairing of the Deauville so spoilt with that somewhat. Had a lovely spin in the sunshine on the North Down coast to Portaferry and back, about 65 miles, really enjoyed it. Got back and my bike wasn't ready yet so had a spin on an R1200RT. Always had an itch about these so had to scratch it. That's when I discovered I have height issues! At 5'8.5" I can flat foot it on one foot leaning to the side or on balls of both feet when level. Now that's ok on a flat dry surface but at a junction with a bit of a camber or loose grit I might come a little stuck. Apart from that it was a lovely smooth bike and surprisingly for the size of the beast turns into corners beautifully. So got back to the showroom and my bike was ready. So i jumped on my Deauville and headed on my 25 mile ride home thinking about the F800 GT. Now here's the thing; As I was heading home, I thought, "you know, even though my Deauville is 9 years old (14k miles), it is lovely and planted to ride, the quality is there and still shines through" Is a new F800GT worth over 3 times the value of my bike? I decided not. If I have enough spare cash lying about though I may change my mind! Sometimes though if you have an itch you just have to scratch it and find out rather than be left wondering.
  32. 5 likes
    These Dutch bikers you met are stupid ****holes. By far most Germans that could remotely have been responsible for WW2 and the evil that was perpetrated then, are dead, and the few remaining ones are well beyond riding age. I find it immoral to hold people responsible for the sins & misdeeds of their parents (in the loosest sense of the word). Some 35 years ago I had a similar experience near the Scottish border (I was walking the Pennine way). At a cafe the landlady was most unfriendly, because she thought my (then) wife and I were Germans. When she found out we were Dutch, not German, she apologised profusely, but I still felt offended. My experience with foreigners is in general very positive, irrespective of their nationality. The only exception are the two occasions when ladrones tried to steal my stuff and roll my wallet in Madrid, but even then other Madrilenos interfered: that is how I found out I was being robbed, I had no clue. And, while I very much deplore your Brexit, I hope we can still live as civilised neigbours after the dust has settled.
  33. 5 likes
    Living in France I have to disagree, it is my experience that it is the snotty British immigrants who spoil with their arrogance. I would also add that the courtesy that bikers get in France from other road users makes it a real pleasure to ride here and also the roads are empty, so enjoy your experience and stay safe. If you see a Police biker on his own be aware his mate is hiding somewhere as they always ride in pairs.
  34. 5 likes
    Sounds like that needs addressing then mate, do a shoulder check, you know it makes sense.
  35. 5 likes
  36. 5 likes
    Hi Mike, Nice to hear from you again, but you've been away too long and completely missed the Triumph Trophy that came after the Versys!
  37. 5 likes
    It might help to take a look at the tractive force graphs I produced for another thread. Note: this is for the NC700, not the 750. If I can find a dyno readout for the NC750 I'll update them. If you aren't familiar with these graphs, I'll just talk you through the first part. Looking at the NC graph: you have road speed along the bottom axis, and tractive force (i.e. how hard the engine shoves the bike) up the vertical axis. That dark blue line which sweeps down from upper left to lower right is the "ultimate tractive force curve", and represents the tractive force curve you would get if you had a continuously variable transmission which held the engine at maximum power all the time. In other words, it shows the maximum possible tractive force at any road speed, and it cannot be exceeded. The aim of a motorcycle designer is (usually) to get the gearing and engine rev range set up such that you can stay as close to that curve as possible. Look at the NC graph, and start with 1st gear, which is the bright blue line at the top. As you go up through the rev range the tractive force follows a curve which is the same shape as the torque curve (because it is the torque curve, but taking into account the gear ratio as well). At about 36mph you hit the rev limiter, and need to change up to second gear. When you change gear, you drop a vertical line down from the end of the blue (1st gear) curve until it intercepts the orange (2nd gear) curve. So you'll hit 2nd gear at, what, three fifths of the way along the 2nd gear curve? Something like that. But look at that point: you've just dropped a lot of tractive force (from about 2250N to 1600N) and you are well away from the ultimate tractive force curve (dark blue). As you continue to accelerate you approach the ultimate curve until the engine rev-limits at about 50mph and changes up again. Once more you drop a vertical line down until it meets the 3rd gear curve and suffer a big drop in tractive force. Each of those drops takes you well away from the ultimate force curve because the engine rev limits so early. Now look at the Versys graph. Each of those curves continues until they actually cross the curve for the next gear, so a correctly timed gearchange results in no loss of tractive force. Importantly, if you follow those curves, jumping to the next gear when the curves cross, you stay much closer to the ultimate tractive force curve, and therefore get much more acceleration out of the bike. Look again at how close you can stay to the ultimate force curve, and give Kawasaki a little nod of appreciation. Oh, and one last point: no matter what gear and what road speed, the Versys always produces more "real" tractive force and more "ultimate" tractive force, which is why it is decisively quicker than the NC under all circumstances. (By the way, racing teams use these curves to determine the optimum point to change gear.) Perhaps you can see how the rev limiter really holds back the NC compared with the Versys. Breathing on the cams, or gas flowing the engine, might make a slight difference (i.e. lift the curves up a bit), but unless you can free up more revs you'll always have those big drops in tractive force - away from the ultimate force curve - whenever you need to change up a gear. That is the biggest limitation in the NC's performance.
  38. 5 likes
    Just wear black is my answer. When the hi vis gets dirty bin it and start again. I have tried washing them weekly, Vanish, overnight soaks, Techwash, nothing really works.
  39. 5 likes
    Paul, you're so very right. I had a 900 Sprint for 7 years and took a few test rides in that time, but every time I rode home on the Triumph it was like putting on an old pair of comfy slippers. I sold it and got a BMW in the end because I wanted to go back to shaft drive. The shaft was good, the suspension was great but I missed the engine. Really missed it. Thanks for the report! Nice photo too.
  40. 5 likes
    I have a big cardboard box full of all the U.K. and American size stuff. Spanners, sockets, the works. I should sell it/give it away/dump it but I can't (or won't). There's a big portion of my life in that box. One day someone might say to me "I'm looking for the special spanner.."
  41. 5 likes
    When garages fit wheels using a windy hammer--you cant get the wheels off your self--they are unbelievably tight--and the use of a strong socket bar--a 6 foot scaffolding tube--is the only way to get them off--but it was hard work for the wobbly old wife--bloody hard work!!--I even got a sweat on watching her struggle--but if she wants to be a independent woman--let her be---and don't say I told you so to her !!! the looks could kill you--- no don't say we haven't got all day either -- offer her a couple of wet wipes when finished--but don't expect a thank you for them
  42. 5 likes
    Although the lifan makes the c-90 more usable in todays traffic ,I just couldn't change the engine,even if it takes less than an hour to change, ,I just couldn't. I went for a ride on it to my local honda dealers on tuesday, it rides like new, so an oil change and an iridium plug is all Im going to do to it.
  43. 5 likes
    If you think they were rattly you should have heard my Ducati Multistrada with its dry clutch fitted with a carbon ventilated cover. On one occasion I pulled up behind a young lad driving a real old banger of a car. He heard my clutch as waslooking around his car as if to stay now whats gone wrong with it
  44. 5 likes
    My Integra sounded like two skeletons shagging in a metal box. But it flew! So I never worried about it..
  45. 5 likes
    Not a fast bike as such, I was riding home on my GPz750 across Bodmin Moor, it was mid night and as I crested a hill the road turned gently left and went down a long fast decline. On my right was a lake which sat at the bottom of the decline and was sheltered beneath two large dark hills. In between the two hills sitting low and perfectly framed was the full moon. The reflection of the moon off the still lake bathed the whole valley area in a blue light, It took my breath away and I was mesmerised by the lake, the moon and the scenery ahead. This for me was the moment which defined why I ride a bike. The night was warm, the road was empty, the bike was singing and it was just me, the bike and the moon.
  46. 5 likes
    Plainly a young lady of absolutely impeccable taste! For me, a 'best bike'? Jeeze, that's a toughie. I'm delighted to be able to say that I have got my eager leg over quite a number of 'very special' bikes! From my early days I would choose the Vincent Rapide, Velocette Thruxton, BSA Goldstar and Ariel Square Four. From more recent times the RC30 stands out as exceptional. Absolutely brilliant. I had two of them in my garage for services and got up at stupid o'clock one Sunday to road test them back to back. Glorious experience.
  47. 5 likes
    I just ride my Suzuki 110 scooter for a week. Makes the NC feel like a perfectly sprung rocket ship...
  48. 5 likes
    Thanks for such a thoughtful reply. I admit to being conflicted. The reality is a year ago I had 8 grand in my pocket to spend on a bike, because I was bored with my Versys and just wanted a change. Strange as it may seem, nothing our there really floated my boat. Bikes are awfully "samey" these days. I wanted something "different" and "innovative" and "characterful", and all I could see in the dealers were rows of clones. You know what? - all we've had since Honda's 750 four arrived way back in 1969 are tiny little incremental improvements, accumulating over the years to make bikes much better in every way than that 750, but essentially exactly the same in terms of layout, functionality, and even the basic technology (apart from electronic engine control). Bike manufacturers are the most risk-averse product manufacturers I can think of, and I think that's our fault - the people who buy motorcycles are themselves extremely conservative and resistant to change. So of course I looked at loads of bikes, and the only thing that intrigued and interested me was Honda's DCT technology. I've ridden automatic scooters before, but this was very different. I did think about the 1200 VFR DCT but I was concerned about two things: firstly, it's a big, heavy bike which I thought might be too much for me to handle. Secondly, the DCT on that model is a couple of generations older than the one in our NC's and doesn't get such good reviews. In the end, here's what happened: I bought a DCT gearbox, which happened to have a motorcycle attached! In every way bar one it turned out to be a great choice. It handles better than the Versys, it has Honda's traditionally good build quality, and it fits me nicely. I love the low-revving character of the engine. And that DCT - it is simply sublime and the thought of going back to a traditional gearbox is quite off-putting. The only thing that disappoints me is the lack of acceleration compared to my Versys and all the other 600-750cc middleweight bikes I've driven (oh, apart from a 750 Guzzi I once rode). I love the feel of a bike surging forwards when I crack the throttle (I'm not interested in speed - I almost never go above 95mph, so 180mph superbikes leave me cold). So, I'm not dashing out to swap it for something else because I love the DCT and it's a great bike for me in every way apart from that one thing. Right now there is no obvious alternative, because whatever I choose would involve going back to a traditional gearbox. My brother says every vehicle you buy is a compromise in some way - the chances of finding something that is perfect for you in every way is pretty remote, so I should just acknowledge that and enjoy all the good bits about the NC. He is probably right. So for now, in the absence of any obvious alternatives, I think I'll end up sticking with the NC, at least in the short term. After all, it is a great bike for me in almost every way.
  49. 5 likes
    Sounds like it's time for a change. I feel the best way to get more power from an NC is to Part ex it for a faster bike. Be interested to here what you replace it with, I hope you will be happy with it whatever it is. 🏍🛵 I miss my NC, the power was never an issue, as It could keep up pretty well with anything else being ridden with a bit of restraint. And very few vehicles will keep up with a DCT off the line without a lot of histrionics on the throttle and clutch.😎 My replacement, a 125bhp Triumph, is nice but not really faster in normal use. It drinks like a blooming fish though and it's a heavy old bus. But I do love older bikes, horses for courses. It's always a bit of a revelation when you find you bought the wrong bike.🤔
  50. 5 likes
    Well the Integra swingarm is installed on my 2016 750X and I think it looks loads better than the original steel one. It went straight on without any problems. If anyone else is tempted to do the same bear in mind you also need the Integra wheel spindle and chainguard, everything else (shock, linkage, brake caliper etc) fits just fine.
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