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Showing most liked content since 18/05/18 in all areas

  1. 16 points
    This morning my 1992 Yamaha FJ1200 passed 100,000 miles. I bought the bike in 2004 on 15,000 miles. The engine has only ever had routine maintenance and the bike has never failed on me. I've not used the bike for a couple of years but thought I had to get it back on the road. These days I mostly ride my 2006 Suzuki SV650 which is a lot lighter and just a quick in the real world. But the FJ is comfortable, smooth, fast and a real torque monster - an effortless high speed long distance machine.
  2. 15 points
    Colleagues! Yesterday I traded my NC against a different bike. I felt I should say it was "with regret", but of course it wasn't as otherwise I wouldn't have done it. You may recall from previous threads that I'd been very impressed by the BMW F800GT and wanted to try out a VFR800F, but it turned out to be a real problem. No dealer has any demonstrators - all that Honda is interested in providing demonstrators for are the whole of the new CB range and the Africa Twins (plus one other model I can't remember). Apparently the VFR is such a well established model that everybody already knows whether they want one or not. There are a good number around second-hand, but dealers basically don't want people just taking them for a joyride to see whether they like it or not, because it's just putting miles on the clock and each time it comes back it needs another valet. I see their point. I had the same experience at Pidcock Triumph in Nottingham yesterday morning (the VFR was a trade-in, presumably) - they basically won't let you ride it until you are ready to shake hands on the deal. Anyway, I did get a good look at it and sat on it (don't worry, I didn't make engine noises). In the end I decided against the VFR this time (but not forever) for the simple reason that the BMW seems to fit my body better. The handlebars weren't quite right for me on the Honda, although of course there are aftermarket risers and stuff for both bikes (all bikes), so none of this stuff is a show-stopper. I was also hoping for a ride on the Crossrunner, but again there isn't a demonstrator available locally, although my local Honda dealer (Vertu Nottingham) was willing to ship a second hand one over from another branch. In the end I decided not to pursue that route because of time pressure, although that only means not this time - see my thoughts on that next. Yesterday I realised something, which I should have realised at the beginning: none of this is that important, because whatever I buy I can swap it again next year. Meanwhile I'm certain to enjoy it, whether it's an MZ125 or an FJ1300. Also, and importantly, I'm aware that I'm pushing things a bit for the "sweet spot" to move on my existing bikes, with biking being such a seasonal pastime these days (they've depreciated £25 each since last week). So, I bought the F800GT from Pidcock BMW in Nottingham. It's a 2017 model, 5000 miles on the clock, fully loaded (comfort pack, dynamic pack, pannier boxes), two-year BMW warranty (identical to a new bike), and a Givi screen. The cost to me was my two bikes (NC and Versys) plus £2.2k, which is £200 above my budget, but sod it. I already know I'll like it, and if I find something else I like more (like a Crossrunner, Africa Twin or VRF800F?), I'll swap it again next year. The "clean" trade-in price for the NC is terrible: I think mine cost me about £7,800 new in 2016, with all the extras, and the dealers all offered me the same money for it: £3,900. When it comes to value you can ignore the accessories, so let's say it has depreciated from £7,100 to £3,900 in less than two years. Yes, I realise I could probably get a bit more if I sold it privately, but that still feels like a shocking rate of depreciation. The ten-year-old Versys did surprisingly well - £1,900. I would have thought nearer £1,200, but there you go. I very much intend to stick around (if you'll have me), having made some great online friendships and I find this place to be an oasis of reasonableness, good manners, tolerance, modesty and good humour (although it does go downhill a bit when I'm online). Oh, and expertise, too; we have access to people who actually know what they're talking about - what a rare delight on t'internet!
  3. 13 points
    Can I just chip in my two penneth on the CB500 range, I have for the past 50 years been a serial "bike changer" sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. Never kept a bike longer than a year so if you do the arithmetic and factor in the fact that some bikes never even made the year mark and by some considerable distance then the numbers are quite frightening. The CB500X is just coming up to 1 year old and try as I may I cannot find anything that I would like to replace it with, ok I have tailored it to meet my requirements (Heated grips, gear position indicator, grip puppies, fenda extenda, tank protector, Michelin PR4's with "Tyre seal installed", shaved seat, rack and Givi Blade top box, rear hugger, sidestand plate, center stand, Hawk accessory bar with spotlights, Daneli mini soundbomb, Givi XS319 tanklock bag, loobman oiler, Evotech radiator guard, Fuel Micro Mini minus baffle and a liberal coating of Acf50 oh and a detachable sheepskin seat pad, lovely.) but I can think of only two reasons for arriving at this point. 1) The 500X is the perfect, and I use the word with due consideration, motorcycle for my requirements and or 2)I have eventually "wised up" to what really matters with regard to a motorcycle (may be one and the same thing thinking about it). I have test ridden all sorts of very diverse bikes over the last month but nothing for me come close to the packaged delivered by the budget, A2 little Honda. I really don't know whether to rejoice or worry. Geoff.
  4. 12 points
    The Deauville's hard to beat. Personally I like the built in panniers, suits the lines of the bike and of course very handy. Went for a spin on Saturday night down to Newcastle (County Down) for an ice-cream and a walk along the front. Yes, it is only about 70bhp, but for the lovely twisty roads through the Mourne mountains down to the sea it was more than adequate. Surprisingly, with my wife on the back it doesn't handle any different with no noticeable reduction in power or torque. Only time you'd notice a pillion was turning at walking pace, but I guess that would be the same on any bike. That's our friend's bike beside mine, a Ducati Multistrada 1200S; nice bike but out of my league!
  5. 10 points
    Lat week I had the 1st service done on Victor. At the same time I had the lowering kit fitted and the following bits transferred from the NC750X that I traded in. Running lights Top box Footrests SatNav holder Gebring and Optimate leads. Since then I have added one bit of bling which were the reservoir covers. This means that Victor is now fully farkled. Well at least for the time being image uploading site photo hosting
  6. 10 points
    Far more fun than the hum-drum little Fiat. I could wear a helmet and he could wear doggles.. Only price stands in my way (sigh).
  7. 9 points
    I need to share my experience with trying to eliminate tight and slack points on a chain with my newly acquired NC750x dct bike that has done 11,000 miles. The variation was 30mm at tight point and 40mm at slack point. I decided to replace the front sprocket and chain ( DID 520 ZVM-X chain JTF 1373-17 sprocket) as rear sprocket showed no signs of wear. After fitting I still had the same chain tight and slack points? Further investigation revealed that the chain had a tight spot every 180 deg turn of rear wheel which meant that the rear sprocket was running eccentric. So I decided to replaced the rear sprocket and the result was the same? This led me to the conclusion that the rear sprocket was not a good fit on the wheel hub and needed to be centralised on fitting, as you could move the sprocket on the hub before tightening the 5 locking nuts ( about .005 ins of play, same on original Honda one) Having some 3m foil tape, I placed this in four places around the side of the hub making a good tight fit and centralising the sprocket. This worked and now the chain has the same tension in all places. My conclusion is that I replaced the original chain and sprockets unnecessarily and the problem was with the tolerances of the rear sprocket not being close enough.
  8. 9 points
    Sold the Deauville last night and just rode 90 miles home on this baby. She has 6K Kilometres on the clock and had one careful lady owner(really) Initial impressions:As much fun as the CRF250L but better able to manage open road and even motorways. I did a short motorway section earlier and she ran well up to an indicated 140KPH(87 mph) so overtakes were not as scary as on the CRF. ABS brakes are a big improvement and the increased tank range, body work and screen make a big difference to comfort. I will have to follow Brian and look for a dead sheep for the seat. Planning to take her to France in September Rumour has it that she is being called Sally the Rally
  9. 8 points
    Took a ride on this new CB1000R today as part of Honda's week long "Neo Sport Café" range launch. So what is it? It's not a retro or another super naked but as Honda tend to do very well it's kind of in a class of it's own just like the NC range and also the X-ADV. I found it very comfortable even stepping off my CRF1000 armchair, very similar to the CB650, slightly more over the front and higher pegs. As seems to be a theme with bike tests the left hand mirror was loose! The last four Honda's with bar mounted mirrors have been the same so I couldn't get this one in any decent position for it to be any good. Out on the road it's very light and handles beautifully the engine is super smooth and with 140 bhp is enough for anyone. I found Sport mode a little snatchy at low speed but a quick button press into standard mode smoothed it out. I would recommend a ride if you get a chance and take a look around it, this is Honda quality and attention to detail at it's best.
  10. 8 points
    Took the Guzzi V7 111 for a brief test ride earlier this week, left me quite bemused. For the first say 1/2 mile I thought what a dog, then things began to change. The character of the bike started to gradually seep through. Like the tentacles of some living organism, it began to wrap itself around me and at the same time delivering a relaxing, comfortable ride, not as being on the bike but as being part of the bike. I have owned several of the modern classic air-cooled Bonnevilles and they did not come close to the experience that the Guzzi delivered. This may sound a trifle fanciful but I cannot think of any other way to describe it. I only rode it from Thirsk to Helmsley about maybe 30 miles at most but I was glad to give it back before it got even more under my skin. I would not part with my 500X as I know that I would regret it terribly but should I decide to add another bike this would rank as a serious contender. Geoff.
  11. 8 points
    I'm sure you'll be able to get an after-market seat from Vietnam. You'll be able to fit Mrs Spindizzy, your mother-in-law, two children, a grandparent and a goat on it with room to spare..
  12. 8 points
    I had a 650 V-Strom. Cracking engine but a heavy lump at low speed. Getting at the "back" sparkplug is a faff which is why the dealers use a teleporter or skip to the service book stamping stage via time machine. Definitely more fun but less practical than the NC. I was looking as XSR-700's, basically the MT styled by an adult but limited by starting with an MT. Love the bike, won't pay what they want for them. My conversation about how they could SELL me side panels but expected me to GIVE them the ones fitted to the Hurley-Pugh was a laugh. I had an XT600. If you buy a Yamaha warn me first, I'll buy shares in ACF-50. BMW? Take your bull**** detector and go talk to their suited reptiles. Keep repeating to yourself that they are just the same components the Japanese use assembled by workers with less practice. If you like the bike and that doesn't worry you go for it, just don't let them convince you free coffee and toadying makes any difference. Andy
  13. 8 points
    Some months ago was invited to a corporate track day at Cadwell and as is usual with me i left things a little late to sort out. I chose one of the Benelli's to ride and it hadn't ran for nearly 2 years, new battery was fitted last Tuesday and she fired up first caress of the button, sounded great. Loaded the van and set off Wednesday lunch with the eldest lad and a mate for a night at the White Hart prior to the Thursday track day. Very interesting 16th century pub, don't know if any of you have tried it? All went well, weather was good and as usual the bike drew quite a bit of attention, I think because people don't believe it can survive a race track and are waiting for it to blow up, this time it didn't happen. Bumped into Hick'y in the assembly area and offered him the bike for the Isle of Man, for some reason he didn't seem to keen, but he did end up taking people round the track in a fancy Beemer during lunch, my lad had a go and thoroughly enjoyed it. Packed up and set off for the long drive home about 5 and we exchanged tales all the way, brilliant day.
  14. 8 points
    Why would they extend it? No one ever walked out of a bike showroom in disgust at the service interval. The company accountants on the other hand limit my choice of repmobile. Do not assume the mileages are set by engineers. We have evidence they are not. Oil from VStroms in the US suggests the life could be doubled. Triumph posted me a new service book on the day Harley went to 6000 arbitrarily adding 2000 miles to give 6 . Long distance riders routinely ignore the intervals and few suffer mechanical issues (low quality electrics get you). I have been to meetings on this (not on cars, larger vehicles) and the loudest voices are the parts salesman (wanting shorter intervals) against the vehicles salesman (wanting longer). Servicing is just a product to be sold in the market conditions. Andy
  15. 8 points
    Only the dictionary definition of a sidecar stands in my way.. Sidecar. - An abortionate device designed to make a motorcycle slower.
  16. 7 points
    Well folks....I've pulled the pin on a CB500x 2018 model in silver....after much deliberation I thought why not give it a go....so the NC will be going next Saturday. ...time will tell if I've made the right move☺. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GdOuRGE-TDJijd53PWtICKyxsS7t_Ei3/view?usp=drivesdk I had a shot of the CB650f yesterday....a lovely bike with a creamy smooth engine and plenty of go in all gears contrary to what some reports say....a great all rounder....it's just the riding position didn't really suit me...and I decided Ilike the extra wind protection of a half faired bike. I had a test ride of a Crossrunner as well at the Honda weekend in Glasgow today....what a cracking piece of kit....as soon as I drove down the road you could feel the difference in suspension quality from the NC....and the seat....so comfortable. ...you could ride this bike all day.....and that engine....glorious.......I suppose that's where all the extra money goes Anyway.. CB500 here we come....there may be a couple of goodies for sale soon that came off the NC ☺
  17. 7 points
    Perfectly, that's actually me and my five siblings when 'I were a lad', Mum riding, Dad on her lap, I'm second from the back in the red T shirt
  18. 7 points
  19. 7 points
    I'm at 187 miles used it 20 times. Once for a Smidsy in Ashbourne and nineteen times when trying to indicate .
  20. 7 points
    Took the Crossrunner in to have it’s first service tomorrow plus having lowering kit fitted and some extras transferred from the NC I traded in. When asked what I fancied as a loan bike I surprised them by asking if the Rebel demo was available. As we was a nice sunny warm day I thought it would be ideal to ride home through the villages which it proved to be. It’s certainly not a fast bike and seems to at it’s happiest at 60-65 MPH although it’s capeable of more. It was certainly capeable of several overtakes The riding position seemed a bit cramped at first but the seat seemed to be extremely comfortable. When stopping and putting your foot down it feels as though the ground comes up to meet you. Certainly no need of a lowering kit on this one😀 To summit up for anyone of short stature who is not fussed about high speed I can certainly recommend this bike.
  21. 7 points
    Absolutely agree with you regarding the Deauville which is why I had 4 of them. I bought them as second bikes to use on my commute but more than once actually took them on holiday as can be seen in this picture of me down in one of my favourite places Dingle. imagehosting
  22. 6 points
    I bought myself a Royal Enfield Himalaya.. It got delivered Thursday............. In my umbel opinion it looks great,,I just love the look ,,its in black...Ive done about 150miles onit allready..it needs servicing at 300,,and I think its going to cost me!!... I really got it todo some off road riding ... and really probably should have stayed on road for the first few hundred miles ,, but the Larkes where singing the sun was out ,I just had to test off road,,,and you no what!!!! it was fan (bloody) astic ..I,v had a great couple of days.. the bikes is actually better than I thought it would be... all in all I,m dead chuffed!!!!!!!!
  23. 6 points
  24. 6 points
    As you know, I'm in search of a replacement for my NC750X DCT. See this thread for more of the discussion: Before I continue, I should mention that I've been diagnosed with "Severe degenerative changes to the facet articulations L3 - S1", which means I get terrible pain in my lower back, which comes and goes in severity but never goes away. Up until now I've always assumed I need an Adventure-style bike because I like the upright riding position. I also dislike the high seat height on them, and the stupid styling which requires them to have no protection for any of the moving parts against salty, gritty, dirty water flung at 70+mph from the wheels. However, everything changed today when I tried the BMW F800GT. First impression: a really low seat height, dead comfy seat and very easy to handle. When I rode it several other things really stood out. Firstly, the suspension is marvellous compared with anything I've ridden before - it handles great and most of all it's extremely comfortable, helped by the excellent seat. Damping is electronically adjustable. The whole bike feels like it's in a different class from those I've ridden up until now (which it should - they are considerably more expensive, and out of my price range if I buy new). But this is the most important thing: I was expecting quite a reach to the handlebars and therefore back twinges, but I was quite wrong. In fact the forward lean is quite modest and I would say if anything it's better for me than an Adventure bike in terms of back comfort. The slight forward lean stops bumps going vertically up the spine. The engine, though, is most strange. There is a surprising amount of clickety clacking from it, although I've noticed this a lot with bikes that have bodywork - they direct the noise up to the rider. But most of all it's really weird to listen to a 360-degree parallel twin - it's 30-odd years since I've ridden one. Also, there is a surprising amount of intake noise when you're giving it some beans (again, I suspect due to the bodywork). In terms of performance, it is quicker than the Versys or the Tracer, which you'd expect as it has 90bhp. The Tracer feels like it has a flatter torque curve - the BMW pulls as well as you'd expect, but unleashes maximum acceleration if you let it rev pretty high. It will easily outgun all but the fastest cars - 0-60mph is sub-four seconds. The other notable thing about the bike is that it runs hot - the temperature gauge hovers around 100C and the engine covers are too hot to touch. It's deliberate, apparently - optimises efficiency. But it does blow quite a lot of hot air up at the rider (which I don't think would bother me, to be honest). The fly-by-wire throttle takes a little getting used to - it seemingly deliberately has a rather "soft" response at small openings. I stalled it when pulling away at a T-junction because, being used to a cable control, I didn't give it enough twist. Easy enough to get used to, though. Personally I don't like the soundtrack at all, but in every other way I really, really like the bike. It's a classy bit of kit. The big lesson for me is that I should be trying Tourers, rather than Adventure bikes. Hoping to find a VFR800 to try out next.
  25. 6 points
    So, I've owned the F800GT for a few days now, and I thought I'd give you my further impressions. Firstly, this one doesn't have any of the clickety clatter from the engine that I mentioned when riding the demonstrator. Bit of a mystery. The bike feels understated and very competent, and not "in yer face" in any sense. It certainly isn't characterful, but it's definitely quick enough to pass the "fun" threshold, which sadly my NC never did. The ride, handling, steering and overall feel is really good, and if you like things that feel a little bit "special" in terms of quality, then the F800 delivers on that. It feels low, light and easy to manoeuvre when you are astride or beside it. "Discreet" is a good word for it - it doesn't look exciting, it doesn't sound exciting, and it's not scary or larey to drive. If you like discreet and understated, and don't need to show off, it would suit you. The fly-by-wire throttle is weird at first; I think we don't realise just how much our muscle memory has got used to pulling on a physical Bowden cable which has an unchanging 1:1 ratio between the movement at each end. The FBW throttle has no play in it; you can't feel it take up the slack in the cable; you can't feel the throttle plate opening. Also, it tries to be "helpful" by making the ratio slower at small throttle openings (this is based on how it feels, not what I've read), so it's rather easy to stall it if you are used to unleashing 30bhp at the merest crack of the throttle plate on your supersports bike. The switchgear is interesting. You can tell when operating it that there can't be any "proper" wiring to them: they are just too small and light in their action to have any big contacts inside. The bike uses a CAN bus, and I strongly suspect the switches have nothing more than signal-grade wiring connecting them back to a CAN controller. I don't know if I can blame the CAN bus for this, but there is a short delay in the gear readout responding to a change of gear - maybe a third to half a second; and interestingly that is also true of the Neutral light, which definitely isn't connected directly to the neutral switch in the gearbox, but must get a signal from some electronics somewhere. Now, you may think a third- to half-second delay in the neutral light and the gear indicator responding is too small to notice, and certainly too small to moan about, but it isn't! Almost every time I drive in traffic I notice the delay, and have to make a mental allowance for it when I'm searching for neutral, for instance. This is definitely a strange feature of the F800. The gearing is quite tall, so you actually have to use 1st gear sometimes in normal riding. On the Versys (and the NC) I only ever used 1st for pulling away, there was never a need to go below 2nd when actually moving. The tall gearing makes the bike seem less responsive than the Versys in a top gear roll on at 60 or 70mph, but at that speed it's revving a good 2000rpm lower than the Versys. If you change down a couple of gears to bring the engine into its power band it's surprisingly quick - certainly significantly quicker than the Versys and much quicker (of course) than the NC. So really it's about adjusting your riding style to suit the bike. As for the engine, it's actually hard to find anything interesting to say about it. Being a 360 degree twin it sounds really weird and not particularly pleasant (although Tex has this weird "thing" about them...). There's a lot of intake noise reflected up to the rider when you are giving it the beans. In terms of its performance, it's hard to criticise - gentle and tractable at low throttle and rpm, building up smoothly and progressively to some impressive acceleration and a hard roar at the top end. It's certainly as much performance as I could ever use, and all delivered in a "graceful" way. About the transmission: that belt drive is good. It's extremely snatch-free right down to 1500rpm (possibly lower, for all I know) in any gear, which is better than many bikes. You know, I still love the ballsy, belligerent feel of my old Versys. The off-beat 180-degree throb, the less-than-perfect fuelling, the pull-like-a-b**tard, any gear, any speed responsiveness to the throttle, and the gloriously complex, chordant wail when you're thrashing its bollocks off. Very stirring - bit of a juvenile delinquent. So, there are some aspects of the Versys I miss, but I'm glad I didn't keep it because my particular one was too shabby. But I would certainly consider another. In truth, I don't miss anything at all about the NC. At least, not yet I don't. Oh, I should admit that I miss the DCT, but that goes without saying of course. The fuel economy was nice (high 60s in the winter, low 70s in the summer, rising to mid-70s when pootling), but the F800 is hovering in the low 60s so far, so I can't really complain. Bearing in mind that I never keep any bike forever, the F800GT is beginning to feel like it was a good buy, and the right buy for me at this time.
  26. 6 points
    Oh dear, Oh dear, Oh dear what have I done, out on the T100 for a couple of hours this morning and I am totally smitten by it. The darn thing should be available on prescription. It obviously has some biometric Wi-Fi device which pairs with your emotions and relaxes and soothes you within minutes of setting off on it. My "tubed tyres paranoia" even slipped into the background (but will probably return in the wee small hours). Its no way near as practical as the 500X, it's way more expensive but it moves emotions and stirs the heart. Geoff.
  27. 6 points
    Sorry chaps, I've lost the thread where I said I'd report on the CB500 rack. Following on from the Africa Twin Clique and Triumph Splitters (or is that only Tex?) I'm suggesting the CB500 riders amongst us are a schism, purely because I like the word. So, this is the CB with the full Pizza delivery kit As during the part of todays ride where I was on private land or a derestricted autobahn 😓😶 I discovered the speedo has a skinny little 1 it can squeeze in front of the other number when going really really fast, I'm declaring the set up stable and not that bad at low speed either. There is even enough room to get your leg over. Those clever sausage eaters at SW-Motech make it so you can give three d-zus fasteners a quarter turn each and end up with a lighter yet usable basic rack Andy
  28. 6 points
    I have my Cub on order, don't care what colour or the price told them to get me one...tis my treat to me for being good...
  29. 6 points
    I took a detour past my Honda dealership today just to take a look at this. Wow! I really like it (in the red, not so fussed about the black one) and even Mrs T (who has zero interest in bikes) acknowledged the fact it’s gorgeous.. Going to the Café next door to the dealer for breakfast on Wednesday. Might just ask for a run out on their demonstrator. Can’t hurt, can it?
  30. 6 points
    My IAM team this weekend were - Dave,71, serial bike buyer - downsizing to a Bandit 650, Colin, 81. On his third Pan European, likes his comfort and ability to carry luggage and finally Noel, 84, annoyed at his increasing insurance costs, ex police rider, on a Tracer 700. Then there was me the kid, 66 on Tigger. The conversation over coffee about bikes we had owned was fantastic - Colin had started out on a 1928 Triumph with tank gear change, Noel's police bike was a Francis Barnett 250 (hated it and much preferred his Velocette Noddy bike) and Dave has owned just about everything British and over 500cc built since 1960! What understanding wives we all have!
  31. 6 points
    During the six weeks & 1,920 miles it's been, as I would have hoped, 100% reliable starting first time every time and nothing, that I know of, falling off or breaking. There are a couple of what I will call 'glitches' that are worth mentioning. * It can be a bit hesitant just off tickover when not thoroughly warmed and it does have a 'hesitation' (not enough to call it a flat spot) around 3k revs, although both of these could well be down to the aftermarket silencers which are A LOT more 'free flowing'. I've thought of one more option to quieten them a bit more so this may help. *Running on a trailing throttle at slowish speeds, 35/45mph, there is occasionally a disconcerting 'grating' feel from somewhere, if it was a two stroke I would say the mains had gone, I've put it down to the shaft drive and my inexperience with how they feel - although the Griso doesn't do it! It's not there all the time but going to ask the local Guzzi specialist to try it and see what they think, my mate didn't notice it when he rode it but then did say the thing felt like a tractor to him * I don't like the traction control at all. It's a pretty basic system (which I understand given the cost of the bike) which means it can't be turned off, a minor but real annoyance given the bike has already seen a few gravel tracks and it cuts in the instance it detects any loss of traction. Rather more annoyingly is that it sometimes very briefly cuts in on bumpy roads when on full chat. I can't believe the rear tyre has actually lost traction on a dry road, in a straight line at 50/60mph but the traction control sometimes thinks so and cuts in with the warning light flashing for a split second, almost like a hesitancy in the fueling. Given that one of the prime roles I bought the bike for is back lane blatting about then this is bl**dy annoying so I'm going to see whether there is a 'fix'. Handling and braking are perfectly adequate, in fact the front single disc is very nice to use, lots of feel and plenty of power for the size and speed of bike. The ABS works but doesn't seem intrusive, not given it a thought since initially trying it out. The new shocks have adjustable damping as well as preload and are much better than the standards as long as left on lowest settings, lucky I'm a big lad. The front end is a little harsh (not as bad as a the NC) but nothing to worry about and certainly tracks fine. Given that the new tyres are 'on/off road' it's shows just how poor the original, well worn, Pirelli Street Demons were, 'orrible things, white lined badly, no feel on the front and didn't inspire confidence in the wet, perhaps that's the reason for the traction control! Headlight seems ok, I don't plan on a lot of night time riding but bright enough for the couple of occasions I have needed it so far. The horns (yes there are two of them) are quite loud, Italian spec I guess Switchgear is standard spec Jap stuff and all the better for it. Physically, it's quite a small bike and the seat is not the thickest but I was fine for 6 - 8 hours of riding (with breaks ) in France and certainly no issues for me when out for two or three hours. The seat though is quite small and, combined with my fat bum and shorter than necessary pillion peg to seat distance it's not that comfortable for my wife, an hour max. and she's struggling. It also meant putting the rack back on for my trip to France as not enough room for my 20L Kriega and my bum on the seat luckily it's a ten minute job to put on/remove. Performance wise, like the handling, it's adequate. Top speed for me has been 105 on the clock and that's adopting 'the crouch', in the real world though it's very happy at 65/75 with a bit in reserve and I don't need more than that without a screen. It initially pulls really well from 2.5/3k but then just flattens off so although it will rev to the 7k limiter there really isn't much point and better to short shift up into sixth and use the torque. If you do this then really only need to change down when in 30/40's or nadgery back lanes - or stopping of course Gear change is very light and positive, my Griso is the same, the delicate lever movement is counter intuitive to the vee twin tractor feel. Fuel consumption has average between 48 and 66 mpg depending on use, it averaged 61mpg on my France trip which is not much less than I got out of the NC. It has a decent tank (21 litres according to blurb) and reserve light doesn't come on too soon so 200 miles to reserve is easy. So, the real question is, do I like it? I bought it partly as a replacement for my Enfield efi (no it's not been sold, just being rested) and in most respects it's a perfect replacement; characterful power delivery, feels just right pottering about at 45/50 where it pulls along really well, it even gets similar 'ohhs and ahhs' the Enfield got. As I had hoped, it's better brakes, handling and performance also help it feel good when pressing on, last night I went for fuel at 7pm and ended up sat outside a pub 30 miles away with a pint of cider. The ride home saw me covered in insects and (rose tinted specs on please) partly reminded of similar evening blasts on a LC or similar 'when I were a lad'. Yes, I definitely like it so far, let's see what it's like once it's had a Winter of use and another 6k miles on it - Andy has already forewarned me
  32. 6 points
    This is going to help you in any way (hey, that's not how I roll!) but on the subject of how heavy new bikes are, I took my GSXR1000K1 for an MOT this morning and moving it around it felt even lighter than it's featherweight 170kg. My AT DCT is a lardy a**sd 242kg and although it's fine on the move it can take a bit of heaving about at a standstill. Given that even my 'lightweight' Guzzi V7 weighs 193kg perhaps the answer to your next bike is a 15 year old sportsbike with a set of flat bars; lowish seat height, easy to wheel around and sure as heck fun Just a thought, like I said, no intention of actually being helpful
  33. 6 points
    Ermmmm .............. . The bikes I currently have are ....... Integra now 5yrs, just about got it how I want it Deauville 16yrs SV650S 17yrs Rickman 2 about 30yrs Rickman 1 about 38yrs BMW R90S 40yrs T150V 42yrs Why? Because I can.
  34. 6 points
    How is Percy doing by the way? 😀😀 Tell him Victor says hello😀
  35. 6 points
    Spot on Trev and Brian. Several years ago I was in Germany and needed a break from the driving. I stopped in a beautiful village and went to the local cafe/bar, sat outside in the shade and on the next table was biker he was in his 70s and riding the 600 Yamaha Tenere with UK plates parked under a tree by the kerb, also cooling down. We got talking and he was making his way home, he was two months into his adventure at this point and had ridden as far east as Istanbul with excursions to look at anything interesting that he either saw or was told about. He did't have a huge amount of stuff on the bike, a small one man tent and enough stuff for the odd night of wild camping if no accommodation was available as well as his clothes. I was interested how he managed, I was riding a BMW R1100RS with full touring kit at the time and it was him that started a change in my attitude to longer trips. He said that if you're doing more than 50-60mph you can't really enjoy the scenery as you're concentrating on the road, or you should be, and for those speeds you don't need a big bike and having a smaller engine meant that you don't get tempted to let the speed creep up. Also he'd been to some pretty remote places in Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria where there were very few people so having a bike you can pick up on your own if you drop it was important, especially given his age but true for all of us.
  36. 6 points
    Just an update. I did some testing today and discovered a couple of things. One was that there was a faint tendency for the bike to creep while stopped in first gear. Another was that the clutch was on a hair trigger with the throttle on take off. Another was that the twistgrip barrel was dry and not moving very smoothly. What is sure is that the dry twistgrip was contributing to the lack of smoothness in the lowest gears. The hair trigger clutch was also. I did the DCT recal and immediately this cured the "hair trigger" there is now a bit of slack in the clutch on take off and this is good. The creeping has also stopped. The gear changes might be a little smoother but I am not sure of this. I greased the twistgrip barrell with some silicone grease and this has helped greatly. I also took some more slack out of the cables and there is now virtually no slack in them. The end product is a much nicer throttle/DCT relationship that is much easier to live with. I suspect that a periodic recalibration will do no harm at all, especially if there is a change of oil brand or viscosity. Many thanks for the helpful input.
  37. 6 points
    After 49 years of riding all types of bikes, I have just put over 7,000 miles on a CB500X in the last 10 months and I can say hand on heart taking everything into account it is one of the best all-round packages that I have had the pleasure of owning. Geoff.
  38. 5 points
  39. 5 points
    For some reason, that defies explanation, it definitely looks better in the flesh. Or metal, actually, as there is hardly any plastic. Up close and personal it just reeks of class parts (just like the CB1100 does) and it’s obvious that Honda have pulled the stops out on this one. I started off thinking it was expensive (until I actually saw it) and then I remembered the price of that CB1100, the VFR 800, the Africa Twin, the Speed Triple and, well, everything these days . Compared to some of the other bikes in it’s class (BMW R9T, Triumph Thruxton) it’s easy to see why it costs what it does. I should probably just go straight home after breakfast on Wednesday. Do not pass ‘GO’. Do not spend ‘£11K’. File it under ‘narrow escape’..
  40. 5 points
    The partner who has turned to the dark side... I.e he has returned to biking after a 20year hiatus and fallen hard for one of these as in I found him staring at his screen in a zombie fashion then realised he was yet again on the Honda website. In black. With the gold bits. I helpfully showed him that the T100 would be perhaps more affordable and reachable now. I can’t print what he said. But I am fairly confident one of them will arrive soon 🤣
  41. 5 points
    Fettling a satnav bracket to go with the modded touring screen. I wanted something neat and tidy, that would clamp to the cross bar. Couldnt find anything I liked on the web, but whilst mucking about with the screen, a thought struck me. I wonder if a Ram mount would fit? Well, it does, but not securely, so a bit of filing later and hey presto! This was the trial fit, in the final fitting, the cable passes through the Ram mount, exits at the bottom and is tucked out of the way behind Tigger. I also replaced the wing nut with a nylock nut. Well pleased with the result.
  42. 5 points
    Maybe you know about http://cycle-ergo.com/ to compare posture / lean etc different motorcycles for your own height / inside leg measurements?
  43. 5 points
    Indeed. A couple of times I have thought it was happening to me, but I escaped it by the skin of my teeth. It’s bad enough growing old, but growing up? Still, I reckon we’ve given life a good run for it’s money. If the worst thing that happens now is riding a CB500 (or T100) for the rest of our lives we’re still coming out on top. And think of the money we’re going to be saving by not keeping buying new bikes (yawn).
  44. 5 points
    I think I can settle this. CB500 = girls bike whereas NC x , s or integra are as follows , bike of champions , those with little legs, city types in that order for those models . Ultimately the DCT being the jewel in the crown in any incantation . Yep. , pretty much nailed it .
  45. 5 points
    Dude, that little gem (a Simson Schwalbe, by the way) was built for (and in) Cold War East Germany where no one could afford cars so filtering never came into it! My own personal favourite would be the NSU Max. Again, built for personal transport in an era where ‘cars for everyone’ was an impossible dream (that no one knew would turn from a dream to a nightmare! ). Fully enclosed chain, real mudguards, smooth surfaces (sigh). Worth a King’s ransom today I suppose. Note the very clever eccentric rod cam drive!
  46. 5 points
    Ah, now you’re talking! Engines are a very ‘personal’ thing (as previously discussed, eh, matey? ) so just because I love a Vee four doesn’t necessarily follow that you will.. but I would bet money on it. Right from the off (1986) the VFR has been something a bit special. For years it was (generally accepted as being) the best in class. You could tour on it (two up? No problem!) commute on it (especially longer distances) and you could do track days (Ronnie Haslam raced one - complete with tax disc - in the Match Races at Donnington Park and did well). Then it all, sort of, went a bit tits up. Honda should have given it a dollop of extra capacity, to keep up with the opposition, but chose instead to introduce a variety of V-Tec in which the engine runs on two valves per cylinder at lower revs and becomes a four valve at high ones. This was a marmite system at it’s best. Some folks love it. Others were/are lukewarm. Honda have stuck with it (stubborn sods) and it’s now a very refined system that works (in my view) as it should have done all along. It’s a smooth, sweet motor that goes like hell when you give it the beans. If it’s excitement you crave, it’s right there at the end of the throttle cable. I would imagine it’s the ‘X’ (Crossrunner) that’s caught your eye? I had a sit on Rocker’s the other day and it made me want one - badly. Lovely riding position, beautiful alloy castings, flawless paint and so on. Some bikes leave me wondering why they cost so much, this one doesn’t. Downsides? The only one that springs to mind is the potential for high service difficulty/costs. If the eight ‘extra’ valves require adjustment it’s a faff that means removing and re-fitting the cams twice. Would that put me off? No. Not really. A spy in the trade confirmed that, because the V-Tec valves only work a percentage of the time, they never alter that much. Would I use one for a winter commute? No. That’s like using a Porsche to get a pint of milk. Buy a cheap old hack and keep the VFR for ‘best’.
  47. 5 points
    I think the Deauville has less than 70bhp. If I remember correctly the later EFI ones had about 67 or so? My old man had a 55 plate 650 not long before they brought in the EFI version. It handled like a cruise liner down a canal but it had the softest plushest OEM seat of any bike I've ever ridden and bags of torque. Shame it weighed the same as a small moon. More of a shame they stopped making them! I wish I wish I WISH someone at Honda would take the mechanics of the NC and make a fully faired Deauville out of it. It'll never happen but I can dream right?
  48. 5 points
    Mrs T had one of those as a loaner while hers was in for work. Fun little car! As to the original question, I think Andy is pretty close to the mark. Folks love their motorcycles. They enjoy lavishing attention on them, love fiddling about with them (why else would they put up with exposed drive chains) and love the thought that their ‘highly strung, high performance engine’ needs moly codling like an aging Hollywood diva. Some of these daft sods even give those motorcycles a name.. (cough).
  49. 5 points
    When at college I took an officer who had money to pick up a new Morgan in my '56 Morgan +4. On our way back we stopped to fill up and the petrol attendant (that indicates how long ago this was!) who said after filling my car and started to fill a brand new Morgan, said "pity they don't make 'em like this anymore".....
  50. 5 points
    Hot, sticky tyres, excellent pillion and a real sense of us both gelling. This is the result - Oops!
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