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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 22/12/18 in Posts

  1. 22 points
    Kent M/Cs delivered Sue's new bike this afternoon. I'm ;looking forward to hear her opinion on how it feels to ride when weather permitting she takes it out for the first time tomorrow. Not sure what happened with the middle picture but if you click on it it should open in the proper size
  2. 21 points
    This last week has been a decent one, not least because my dear old GT 750 has passed its 32nd MOT in a row. Passed without comment to, not bad for a 34 year old. I took this pic to celebrate
  3. 21 points
    Well the GS is now at the dealers - and I'm temporarily bikeless, sob, sob! Thanks for all your support and understanding of the process whereby another change of bike starts off as vague musings and, after some serious agonising over the finances, progresses through to all out new bike lust! I notice none of you tried to stop me, but maybe I'm just regarded as a lost cause due to my past history! The picture below is the same as the new RS I am getting. My existing Shad luggage will fit on without any mods required, and the bike is a little lower and lighter than the GS, and to my mind quite a bit better looking. The fact that I will no longer be in the seemingly despised GS rider fraternity, and will hopefully be a little more anonymous on a much less commonly seen bike, is another bonus!
  4. 20 points
    Today we went to Kent M/Cs to see Sue's new bike which is awaiting PDI. The great news is that when Sue tried it for size she found that the slimmer frame than her current 650 meant that she doesn't need to have it lowered. Here are a couple of photos but sadly due to my phone camera not being too good and the poor lighting in the workshop means that the Denim Blue colour has come out looking black.
  5. 14 points
    That was one of the reasons I advised to make your claim directly against the TP insurer. If 4D are messing your witness about I am happy to meet with him to obtain a Court compliant statement of truth. Just PM me the contact details and I will do it before they upset him and he decides to go away. Once you have that signed statement you will find the TP insurer will look to pay out. There is no ‘property’ or ownership of an independent witness so no issue with me getting a statement from him for you. Your policy will still be running and you can put a new bike on it. Provided you have not claimed against it for the total loss. 4D will want to slow this down as much as possible to extend your credit hire bike use as long as possible. The process should be to put you where you were before the incident and to compensate you for your bodily injury. It’s not about making out of it or screwing the insurers. That is a crazy idea that ends up with us paying the inflated bike premiums that we have to. 4D and the like are just out to slow it all down to make profit. I am not saying you want to profit from it but some of the knee jerk comments of other contributors are ridiculous. Let’s get you back on ,the road on a bike of your choosing and your injuries treated properly. 4D should have already referred you to a solicitor for your injuries and you should start chasing them to refer you to physio ASAP. I am happy to help out. You have my number.
  6. 13 points
    So decided to utilise the ‘ridge’ of plastic that sits behind the rear wheel. bought a stock scooter mud guard that comes with fixing bracket and costs 3.99 scissors are fine to cut it into a shape that sits just on the frame but that is too short to be rubbed by the wheel. the bracket is also soft aluminium and I cut it down to 11cm again with some scissors. Drilled a couple more holes then used it as a template against the ridge. no need to remove anything as the ride height easily accommodates the drill. Drilled through the ridge to accommodate the bolts that come with the mudguard. I just took the chain guard off for photos. Wiped some ACF on the bracket just to keep the rust away. it’s just a solution on the cheap as came in under a fiver.
  7. 13 points
    My new baby !( Bloody big baby ) is here , triumph rocket111 , to add to my ever growing list of bikes , lucky I've got trade insurance which covers multiple vehicles , got to give a bit of a service and check over before she is let loose , cant wait
  8. 12 points
    Having spent quite a bit on suspension upgrades and other useful mods I've had to accept the NC750XA isn't right for me. I'm collecting a CBF100FA on Friday to replace the NC. I have serious multiple orthopaedic problems following a couple of life changing [non fault] accidents in the last 28 years so I can't really blame the NC as I'm quite demanding and have specific needs. Fingers crossed this is a good move! All the best to all you remaining NC owners...
  9. 11 points
    Linguini Carbonara? The machine on the right has won on the Isle of Man six times (Ryan Farquhar x 3, McGuinness x 2 and Josh Brookes x 1) and the one on the left just makes me smile. Which makes it a winner in my eyes!
  10. 11 points
    Since I retired I seem to have adopted the “Australian” attitude to work.. Spanish singer Julio Iglesias was Anne Diamond’s chat show (ITV, I think) and he used the word "manãna" (pronounced "munyana"). Anne asked him to explain what it meant. He said that the term means: "Maybe the job will be done tomorrow; maybe the next day; maybe the day after that; or perhaps next week; next month; next year. Who really cares?" Anne turned to Albert Yatapingu from the Gumbaingeri Tribe (aboriginal) who was also on the show. She asked him if there was an equivalent term in his native language. "Nah" he replied. "In Australia we don't have a word to describe that degree of urgency."
  11. 10 points
    Where there's a will...…………………………………………………………………………………….
  12. 10 points
    I’m a lucky guy with two good motorbikes: My favourite is a CX500 Sports (EC), often known as the Eurosports model. Shaft drive, 80 degree transverse v-twin (like a Moto-Guzzi), 5 spd. Mine is one of the earliest from 1982 and all original although the wheels have been powder-coated black compared with the original silver / bare metal. Just over 26k miles now. The other is an NC700S (2012) with 37k miles now. The NC is something of a sacrificial bike as she will take the winter and commuter batterings that the CX otherwise would. I will do some long tours on her too so she won’t miss out entirely, and I do look after my machines. Here are some pics, just before I cleaned and rust-proofed the CX. I’ll convert her for single rider use only over the winter so pillion pegs and grab rail off and probably remove the front crash bars too, just to de-clutter the look and help reduce weight a bit. The NC also affords me time to do some light sympathetic restoration work, not concourse but I’ll smarten her up a bit. https://flickr.com/photos/8235871@N07/sets/72157704942590604 (still working on direct pic inserts, sorry)
  13. 9 points
    Our, esteemed, friend Andy has actually raised cynicism to an art form.
  14. 9 points
    Light weight is less metal, less cost and easier to achieve emissions so they are all at it. You have to love the Bavarian Muppet Works marketing strategy. They are complicated, less reliable than some and have a warranty department run by Dr. No, so the consumers buy extended warranties, effectively a price increase or a new bike. They make constant changes which they encourage their customers to play top trumps over this driving demand, but also making them more complex and less reliable. The costs are a few cups of coffee and decorating the show rooms, the rest is pretty much free as you pay engineers salaries regardless of them turning out a half tested new item and moving on, or improving current product. You couldn't ask for more without getting into guns and Colombian white powder. Andy
  15. 9 points
    Well this came up locally and it had to be done! 42 years old, 31,000 miles, lots of history, mainly original apart from paint and air filters (airbox supplied)
  16. 9 points
    Well I'm sure that was a tongue in cheek question, but basically your vehicle has too many wheels to be really fun! Also I've just traded in a two wheeled SUV in the form of the GS, and wanted something a little sleeker and sportier this time.
  17. 9 points
    Saw this young lady on one at Kent M/Cs recently And this triked one at Brighton also ridden by a young lady
  18. 8 points
    Thanks for all the sympathy guys, first world problems I know, but still bloody annoying, and very disappointing. Anyway, I've been to see the dealer who has been very helpful given the circumstances which are not even their fault. The end result is that I am having a new R1250GS, and ended up only paying about half the normal difference in price between GS and RS, so I think that is a good deal. Getting a good discount off list price of a more expensive bike which has the new engine should stand me in good stead should I decide to swap to an RS in a year or two. Game on!
  19. 8 points
  20. 8 points
    Hello .........Hello .... is anybody there ? I’m looking for the nc owners forum ! Shush you’ll wake him up and he’ll start talking about mileage again. :0)
  21. 8 points
    It’s an interesting system Triumph have on the LC twins. The crank turns an intermediary gear which drives the cam chain, this, in turn, means that the crank rotates forwards and the cam rotates backwards.. It keeps the cam chain short which should lead to long service life. The shims (9.5 mm same as many Yamahas) live under the rockers which simply unbolt to allow shim changes without disturbing the cam. Nice one Mr Bloor I’m not rushing (my daughter is moving flats today and assisting her takes priority over motorcycles - as Mrs T was at great pains to point out!) just an hour here and there. Not a job I would want to rush anyway, but the second time will be quicker.
  22. 8 points
    I (genuinely) regard the Forza and it’s equivalents as ‘advanced motorcycles’ rather than scooters. Scooters have little wheels and are brilliant in town, but a bit out of their depth on fast roads. The Forza types are much more motorcycle related in their performance and handling but with the added (huge!) advantage of weather protection, storage and fuss free final drive. Getting one over a naked bike isn’t any sort of ‘step down’. Not in my mind, anyway. A year or so before you leave your job in the city? I know just the thing! Currently on a bench awaiting improvements to both power and brakes (and f*** the insurers!)
  23. 8 points
    I'm sort of with you on the fairing and Krauser K2 panniers, but it's been wearing them from new, and they are surprisingly effective and useful. The mud flaps were a genuine Kawasaki accessory and have been fitted from new. The whole thing has a 1980's shoulder pads and flares vibe from the days when it wasn't retro For those of us old enough to remember........
  24. 8 points
  25. 8 points
    Not a fan for various reasons but it's always reminded me of something, then today, while doing some maintenance it suddenly hit me!!
  26. 8 points
    If you really want more power, buy the CBR1000RR silencer, ideally with the CBR1000RR still attached😁😎
  27. 8 points
    Funny you should mention Brough and 1973. That was probably the last time you could have bought one of those for less than the cost of a nice detached house.. Fully charged battery, drop of fresh petrol and she’ll fire right up. Then give it a full ‘fluid’ service before using it (brake fluid, oils/filters, coolant). The tyres won’t burst just because they have been left standing but they may not provide optimal grip any more. That would depend on the use they got before laying up. It’s ‘heat cycles’ that determine that rather than tread wear. If they’re five years old and looking a bit ‘less than fresh’ I would change them. But I’m (probably too) fussy about tyres..
  28. 8 points
    Rocker I have a tip which may help. The last time I got a health scare the results were off the charts and the practice nurse was fueling my worry. I decided to give myself a fixed time to worry and then during the fixed time I worried flat out, looked at medical sites, procedures, imagined the worst possible outcome. When the allotted worry time was over and a worry train of thought started I said to myself "We are done with that now, lets just see what happens" and got on with my life. After about 6 months the results came back clear and I'm still around to annoy you folks. I sincerely hope you are around to annoy us folks for a very long time.
  29. 7 points
    The help and advice on this forum is top notch, great to see so many people assist in others moments of stress. Feels good just to be part of the forum.
  30. 7 points
    As an extra bonus I've even got one you can borrow for a few weeks to make double sure it's perfect for you
  31. 7 points
    Standing between Sam and something she has set her heart on is not an endeavour for the faint hearted..
  32. 7 points
    Have ridden quite a few when I worked for a triumph dealership , but always wanted my own , especially now I have a new lady in my life who fancies trying out the pillion perch , better not scare her too much 😈
  33. 7 points
    Well there’s not too many of them on here.
  34. 7 points
    Nice looking bike Fred, bet you have some fun on that ...... and not all of us are anti-GS, like most things in life you get smattering of absolute cocks no matter what their creed, colour, religion or choice of bike and I much prefer to make judgement about the person rather than how they look or what they ride ...... apart from those snooty NC riders of course
  35. 7 points
    Me, I would change fuel, and oil, take the spark plugs out and turn the bike over slowly to get the pistons moving and the oil pumped around the oil ways before putting the plugs in and starting it up. In my mind get chnace for the oil to circulate prior to login from zero oil in the top end to 2000 rpm on tick over when first started,
  36. 6 points
    Right, I’m (by no means) an expert on the theory. I’m a humble spanner twirling labourer but here’s how I see it. When you lift the clutch you actually disconnect the engine from the drive. The engagement dogs are free to mesh and your gearbox will last 100 years. Cool. Clutchless shifts (as practiced by a number of us) are nearly as kind. You nod the throttle off to reduce the load and ‘feel’ the gears in with your foot. Doing it right is an absolute joy and your gearbox will last 90 years. A quick shift momentarily reduces the load but the gears are slammed into place whether they like it or not. And mostly they don’t. Your gearbox will last the warranty period or six laps of the TT whichever is the shorter.. Looking at a race bike box always shows wear or bruising to the engagement dogs, damage caused by the great ‘God of speed’ that many worship at all (or any) costs.
  37. 6 points
  38. 6 points
    I totally agree. Quickshifters are a hideous bodge that impose considerable shock loads on the transmission. On a race bike it's fine - probably gets you several tenths of a second per lap. On a road bike, though? The engineering inelegance offends me.
  39. 6 points
    Delighted that Sue is chuffed! It’s had quite a power hike since the last model and, well, we might not need more power, but it’s always nice to have, eh? I agree about the quick shifter and certainly wouldn’t put one on either. Even for free. Why? Reasonable question. They add nothing that I am looking for on a road bike and actually take away something (smoothness in ‘give and take’ town traffic. As soon as you touch the lever it cuts the ignition for a nano second which is a major pain if you’re not actually on full throttle and ‘going for it’). I also see them as unnecessarily harsh on the transmission which is a price you might be prepared to pay to shave a tenth of a second off your lap times but ‘why bother’ on the road.
  40. 6 points
    When I was considering fitting one to the Crossrunner (genuine Honda accessory) I asked around for advice from people with the appropriate experience and the general concenus of opinion that for the type of riding we do there was littl or no advantage. Sue took this into consideration and as the dealer made fan allowance against the already discounted extras ( still waiting for some to become available) and decided not to bother with it. As I said her decision.
  41. 6 points
    oooh a heated seat, nice
  42. 6 points
    But also 600 miles FROM Dover 😁 Andy
  43. 6 points
    Get a job in Inverness, only £100 for the tigers insurance , only 4.5 million people in the whole of Scotland, the same as Yorkshire, empty roads so nobody to drive into to, downsides bagpipes, and 600 miles to dover
  44. 6 points
    Seats can be padded. They are like mudguards and mirrors, we alway need to fix what some art school lovie turned into a sculpture. Tank range is very difficult to fix . I never believe journalists on fuel consumption. They don't buy petrol and after a tank full they give the bike back. They can do the whole ride in third and not care. Dare I add the CB500's to the mix? A bit lighter than the NC, so the F feels like it has more go. The range is close to 300 miles and the seat is a decent starting point. It is no taller than the NC and probably narrower, so with less weight certainly feels easier. The R version is faired. I really don't see why lack of performance is listed on reviews, except to justify bigger bikes. The 500's will hit 100 mph, cruise at 85, do wheelies and I'm yet to find a car they can't out drag. You have to use the gearbox more for the extreme stuff, but it's a Honda so the clutch is only for stopping. Unless you are 20 stone it's just a change of riding style in the same way the NC is diesel like. Andy
  45. 6 points
    Well I worked hard to make my GS as perfect (for me) as possible, and thoroughly enjoyed the modding process, but it still wasn't perfect for the reasons I outlined earlier. The 2019 model year bikes have significant major and minor improvements which make them that bit more perfect (for me) and as the improvements are now throughout the range this gives me the opportunity the change to my preferred RS without losing any features. I am sure that will give me even more pleasure in ownership than the GS did, even if the price to change is not easy to justify on a spreadsheet, but when you are approaching 65 like I am, and being realistic, have limited further time to enjoy life's pleasures, especially things like riding which require a degree of fitness, then it isn't so difficult to justify - at least not for me!
  46. 6 points
    Just a little tip that I now use to try and control my consumerist tendencies. And for big-ticket items i.e. cars and bikes it seems to work for me. If considering say a car @ £24k, it's actual price is £20k but then tax in the form of VAT is added making it £24k. Now I don't know about anyone else but if a tax demand for £4k dropped through my letterbox I would be horrified. Apply this to most bikes these days and it equates to a self-inflicted tax bill of £2 to 3k. Now that tends to focus my mind a wee bit. Geoff.
  47. 6 points
    As the others say really. When you do a cold start the mixture will be rich. The primary reason for this is that in engines with carbs or port fuel injection a significant amount of the fuel going in will condense out on the cold walls, resulting in less fuel available for combustion. Since it will only burn successfully within a certain range of air/fuel mixture ratio it is necessary to have a bit more fuel than normal to compensate for the condensed fuel to get it to fire up. Also it is generally much easier to ignite a mixture of fuel in vapour/gas form rather than liquid, and when cold only very small amounts of the fuel will evaporate during the first few cycles, again needing a bit extra to be put in to get enough volatile parts released. This is why winter fuels have a higher volatility than summer fuels (measured on the Reid Vapour Pressure RVP scale). As soon as the engine fires and begins to warm, parts of this extra fuel on the walls will start to come away with the intake air, so the enrichment can be ramped down very quickly. An injection engine will have a "cranking fuel" calibration which will apply while the starter is cranking, then an "afterstart fuel" calibration which might ramp off in perhaps 10sec, then it will run on a mapped value in open-loop until the exhaust oxygen (lambda) sensor is hot enough (circa 300C) to start working at which point it will switch to feedback control of the fuelling (closed loop). The catalyst itself will take a bit longer to get hot enough to start reacting significantly, maybe a minute or so, and hydrocarbon fuel will get through without being reacted. Cars these days have electrically heated lambda sensors to get them working sooner, the NC sensor is not heated (2 wire type) but will start working within a minute or so typically. In the first few seconds of running some hydrocarbon fuel will get through the engine without being burnt, and will mix with condensation (water) in the exhaust gas and be carried out the tailpipe as white vapour. The first few seconds of vapour will smell of petrol to some extent, then the smell should reduce/disappear but the white condensed water vapour will persist until the exhaust system warms enough to keep it gas and invisible. The most white vapour is noticeable a short while after starting because at first it condenses and accumulates inside the cold exhaust and then starts to be driven off again as it warms, so you get a peak in white condensation after a few tens of seconds, 30sec maybe. Enrichment shouldn't be confused with raised cold idle speed, the speed will take longer to ramp down because the engine needs to be a little warmer in order for the combustion to be properly stable so it is held higher to improve driveability and avoid stalling, but after 20 or 30sec the engine should be running more or less stoichiometric fuelling (essential to meet emission regulations).
  48. 6 points
    I just insured the Africa Twin today and I too am with Bennetts. I accepted that they would want to charge me an admin fee for the change over although in the past they have not always done so. When I spoke to them last week I had quite an unsympathetic person but today was entirely a different experience. The premium was going to be around £250 for the year and I had, like Trev above, looked at 'Comparethewotsit' . So there I was talking to this reasonable Bennetts employee and I mentioned that I may as well cancel my policy, pay the £50 cancellation fee and re-insure with some other provider all of whom, including Bennetts, were more than a £100 less. At this he then suggested that he could check other underwriters and a few minutes later came back with a price from Aviva at £139. And after another discussion with his supervisor, they agreed to waive the cancellation fee. So all in all a good result and worth the 20 minutes on the phone. So it pays to use the Comparethewotsit type people to provide bargaining information and find out how they run their business.
  49. 6 points
    My plans for the CB500 are pretty much as you describe. It's on the ramp now as the OE tyres have now got to the point they are annoying me (47HP should not spin up a 160 section tyre in third) but after that it'll be nothing but oil changes until its 34 months old. It'll be on 15000 miles by then, so may have had another pair of tyres and a chain. The big service is valves and plugs which may actually be more accessible by taking the engine out. Access is not bad enough to make you buy a Ural, but it's close. If I fancy it I'll get in and do the plugs, but the valves will be untouched if they sound and run OK. The dealer only sees me on new bike day, he is presented with a service book I've stamped myself and receipts for genuine parts. The dealer is only interested in what he can get for the bike based on the showroom looks. So long as it makes it past the warranty he gives on used bikes (6 months?) he doesn't care. My use of ACF-50 pleases him. The tyres he will use to lower the trade in price if worn, but we both know two tyres could cost me £200 and him the sale, so he won't go silly. The lack of dealer service he may use as a lever, but we both know he'll just order a new manual and replace my stamps with his. He will punish me most for the day it went over 9999 miles, he wants one owner, free MOT (it'll pass when his own mechanics test it) when you buy, second hand bikes to be on under 10k miles. I am in competition with guys trading 18 month old 1500 mile £12000 bikes, so an not his best customer. A sale is a sale though and I usually walk in, point at a bike and say "how much cash for that" so I'm easy to deal with. The purist are now howling that I risk a thrunging sprocket failure everytime I go 2 miles past the oil change interval or a warp core breach by ignoring the valves. I may be, but I know the dealers do this too and there is no epidemic of bikes with burnt out flux capacitors at the side of the road. If it breaks seriously I either fix it or break it for parts. At the minute I'd expect to hand over £2500 cash and ride away a 2021 CB500 to which a lot of my useful bits like mirror extensions would transfer. This is not the cheapest way to own a bike, that would be to buy used, play the MOT roulette and keep changing the oil and shimming the valves until the bores are worn out. Having tried other ways I think it is a balance of hassle and cost. Andy
  50. 6 points
    Last sports bike that I rode was a 2015 R1. Absolutely ridiculous and a complete waste of superb engineering and technology. (my son's bike before it went for track use). I was actually pleased to get off it as it was going to end in grief, either legally or physically. By comparison, the 500 Honda was huge fun. My view is that sub 200kg and 50bhp is the sweet spot for solo road use. Geoff.
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