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  1. Tex

    Tex

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  2. Rocker66

    Rocker66

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  3. Ciaran1602

    Ciaran1602

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  4. Andy m

    Andy m

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 24/02/19 in all areas

  1. 22 points
    After what seems an eternity without a bike, after trading in the previous bike some time ago, I finally collected the new one this morning. I was originally going to change from a GS to the RS which is a little sportier and much less commonly seen on the roads than the GS, which for some reason seems to have a bit of an image problem amongst riders of other bikes. However BMW changed production of the new RS, which will have the same electronic suspension and other options as the GS and also the same improved engine, from March until September without any real explanation of the reason. It would have been much more expensive to change in September because my old bike had already done a relatively high mileage, so I decided to go for another GS. I have to say, despite the rants by Andy about the suited lizards in BMW dealerships, I have nothing but praise for the guys at Pidcocks in Nottingham, and in particular Mark, the salesman who looked after me. After the initial offer, I asked him to see if he could improve it to get the price to change a bit lower, and with a bit more on my trade-in and a bit more off the list price he got to what I felt was a good deal, so I ordered an RS. Then we had all the hassle of the RS no longer being available for March, and after some discussion of options I decided to see if another GS would be feasible bearing in mind that it is a more expensive bike than the RS. Mark was very helpful in getting me a deal which minimised the difference in price and made it feasible for me to go for another GS, so here it is - looking very similar to the old one! Oh and by the way - and nobody in Pidcocks wears a suit, and this was also true of Balderstons where I bought the last bike! I have only done a few miles so far, but I'm already impressed with the new 1250 engine with the ShiftCam technology which physically slides the camshaft to select between two different cam profiles, one optimised for low speed/low power outputs and the other for maximum power at higher revs. This seems to have cured the one thing I disliked about the old engine, which was its very sudden pick up of power from low revs, which could make slow speed manoeuvres at best difficult and at times downright iffy. I'm still a bit disappointed not to have the RS which I had set my heart on, but after I complained to BMW about the hassle and extra expense their delay in RS production has caused me, they have discussed this with Pidcocks and are prepared to make some sort of, as yet unspecified, goodwill contribution should I want to switch to an RS once it is available. After initially being keen on the idea, the reality of all the hassle of switching has made me think twice about doing it all again so soon, so I may stay with the GS for a while, especially as all the BMWs now have three years warranty.
  2. 18 points
    Hello red beauty
  3. 16 points
    As many of you know I have been trying to find a suitable bike as a contingency plan for when the Crossrunner gets too much for me. My first choice is the 2019 CB500X my only concern being the increased seat height. Today I saw one for the first time and really liked the look of it especially in the white. I was really happy when I found I could get on and off easily . I could also put one foot flat on the ground or both feet down with the fronts touching.. With a lowering fitted it should be ideal. When the time comes to change which I'm afraid may be sooner rather than later I think I have found the replacement. I know I will miss the V4 motor both for it's sound and performance but I'm finding the bike harder to manhandle not that it's getting heavier but I'm feeling weaker due to a combination of age health and injury. All this is making me feel less confident.At least having the Crossrunner I proved to myself that I could still ride a reasonably big bike . Having said that I now feel it is becoming time to be sensible in the way that some other members feel resulting in them buying scooters.
  4. 16 points
    Farewell Ting Tong, Hello ? Please bare with me whilst I relate a little tale which I suspect some on here may relate to in totality or a least in part. For the last 50+ years I have been blessed in the circumstance both in health and financial to partake and thoroughly enjoy the way of life that is motorcycling. I have changed bike on a regular, too regular basis but have no regrets whatsoever in doing so. I have been privileged to own all types of bikes and a smattering of scooters thrown in for good measure. Just under a year ago whilst out for a days riding I popped into my local Triumph dealer to kick a few tyres. Sitting astride a T100 I glanced at the reflection in the showroom window and immediately it was 1969 again, ok let's get the age related smart remarks out of the way now. Anyway a few weeks and not so few beer tokens latter there on the drive stood a beautiful Triumph T100 Black. Over the next few days I showered our sons inheritance on this thing of beauty until the dream of a spotty 16 year old stood before a somewhat less spotty but much more follically challenged 66 year old. As time progressed testaments of undying love and fidelity were made to this manifestation of a youthful dream and you know what the promise was reciprocated I think on or about the 3rd of September 2018 when the temperature was 20 degrees C, there was no wind, the roads were clear and clean and physically I was having a really good day with age and past injury related aches and pains at a minimum. However on most other occasion things were less than perfect. The slide down hill was slow but inexorable, the compromises became more difficult to reconcile until Ting Tong became the motorcycling equivalent of a “Trophy Wife” wonderfull to look at but of little practical value and very expensive in both time, effort and money to maintain those all important looks. But soldier on I will as this was the realisation of my dream. This was all starting to go abit, don’t meet your heroes. It got to the stage of just becoming too much effort to take the thing out and instead on being the object of unbridled joy it was in fact becoming a source of irritation but I must soldier on as this is my dream. By now I have gone from a +10,00 mile a year rider to hardly riding at all thanks to a combination of several factors not least deteriorating skeletal issues, the ergos of the bike, the static weight, the climate, I could go on but I sense that I’m losing you again. A few years ago I had a Suzuki Burgman 400, now if Parker Knoll made motorcycles this would be it, comfortable beyond belief, low centre of gravity, Cvt, I’m losing you again. Can't do anything about it though, as this is my dream. Really feeling unhappy at this stage as we are at a crossroads and my dream and reality are drifting further and further apart by the day. Look into ways of resolving this ridiculous situation but rule it out as financially irresponsible. Keep mulling things over and using rationals such as, no pockets in a shroud and you can’t take it with you, I start to justify it but not quite. Just happen to get a call from a good friend where we used to live some distance away who coincidentally owns a Suzuki dealership and he comes up with a more than acceptable deal on a Burgman 400 great, but I can’t as this is my dream. I nip outside to give Ting Tong a love affirming glance and you know what, Nothing, nothing at all, no warm cosy feeling, no, I can’t part with this emotion, nothing. I contact a friend on here (you know who you are) for an objective view and receive the balanced opinion which is greatly appreciated. Sleep on it. Dash out the next morning for a renewal of my dream, nothing, nothing at all. I call my friend and do the deal. This bit’s going to be difficult as I start to remove some minor parts to be retained, always a little emotional. Not this time, take to the task with joy in my heart. Not worrying anymore as the realisation that the dream of a 16-year-old and the reality of a 66-year-old are some distance apart. As the van trundles off down south I feel no sadness only anticipation to the ship arriving from Hamamatsu in early April. To be continued :- Geoff.
  5. 16 points
    Came across this sexy thing at Whiteways. Standing next to it (my NCS) is Sam with her new Forza Very nice machine that Forza. Sam gave it some beans between Loomies and Whiteways. Also saw something very strange at Loomies, a Harley DCT......well actually an auto gear changer mechanism for a guy that had a prosthetic leg. Not a bad day for a ride, dry but the wind was getting up.
  6. 15 points
    Why thank you Spindizzy...oh wait you meant your NCS not me... Well Freddie has made an impact...no, no, no I have not hit another car! I left home at 6:30 this morning absolutely bricking it at the thought of getting on a bike. Even after I had my photo taken (must have looked terrified as they haven't posted it to their social media), it took me a while to get on board and actually ride away. Totally different animal to both the Vespa and the NCS. It leans. It feels like it leans an awful lot! The first right hand turn was Whoaaaaaaaa!! I reach junctions feeling like I have forgotten something (that would be the clutch and gear changes) and panic I am going to stall, no I am not. It is really easy to ride, to coast, to crawl in traffic - didn't do much of that admittedly I am already overtaking tractors, cars, filtering to the front of lights and pulling away. It was a twisty turning muddy lane ride back to the house thanks to Sat Nav's idea of a laugh: oh so you don't want a motorway? Right I am going to take you down every farm track I can, and turned in a tight circle outside the house that I wouldn't dare do on the NC. Got a bit confused by the lack of ignition and couldn't start it outside the house. Consulted Pg50 of the manual that pointed me to the side stand... oh right. Didn't have one on the Vespa so hadn't realised this would be an auto cut out. Spindizzy pinged a message so it was a quick fuel up then off to Loomies (where I overtook the tractor and the car that would not pass it). I got off and went to push it backwards whilst on the incline that everyone hates - an absolute breeze even for my injured shoulder. it is only 40kgs lighter but what a difference. Then introduced Spindizzy to Freddie who he mistook to be the gent next to me so we had a bit of a giggle with him. We had a bit of a faff putting the helmet in but eventually sussed it so I could eat and juggle my tea. We rode off with me up front heading to Whiteways although I did warn Spindizzy it was pretty to view it from the front lit up. I may have almost overcooked a few corners with enthusiasm after dealer told me to keep it at 50mph for 600 miles, but Spindizzy and the manual told me otherwise, so had a little fun. Up the A3 then across to South Harting, Spindizzy took the lead and we ended up some lovely routes around Goodwood racecourse then back to the A27 and up my favourite road to Whiteways. I didn't feel I had any issue keeping up with him. Into Whiteways for a snackette while the wind started to creep up. I had had one wind buffet from the side but to be fair the bike held firm and I didn't really notice it and my neck wasn't hurting like it would on the NC as I had the screen. We then headed our separate ways so I went up through Fittleworth, a right hand at the Weldiggers Arms, Egdean brings me up on the Petworth Road. I reached the A3 and may have seen a certain speed indicated, the bike still felt it had more but I am not going to push it at the moment. Decided not to go home but carry on up to the inlaws with the excuse "I want to see what the lights do in the dark". They weren't in, so headed to M&S at Weybridge who didn't have the food I wanted so I left. I got very confused as bike would not unlock but eventually I managed. Note to self, always carry mobile on ones person incase bike doesn't want to let you open it. 165 miles covered today, 84mpg showing, it had fuel in when I picked it up from the dealers but had 2 bars left it took £11 to fill it, it showed 227mile range when filled, and it now is showing 130mile range and half a tank left. Storage, haven't really tried it, put a few bits in there but not tried the shopping. it fits my Shoei with it's comms attached at the back, we couldn't get it in the front. Front cubby to the left might hold a small bottle of water, but you wouldn't want to put anything small in there i.e. change, you won't reach it as it drops down. I put the Sat Nav cable in there (its where the 12v is) it will close on the cable - I don't hardwire mine as I don't use it that often. Wheels - small but coped fine. Tyres plenty of grip, it was damp and greasy in parts. Height gives great visibility over cars. The whole body shapes gives more presence on the road and a lot of bikes nodded back then looked confused. Lights, apparently very visible from the front and Spindizzy said the brake lights were very bright (well I was concerned about that hedgerow). Coming home tonight it appeared to light the road well. It races away with you so you have to keep an eye on the speedo to remain within legal limits. Brakes aren't perhaps as sharp as they were on the NC but appear adequate. Seat...ahhh...comfy. Weather protection, didn't feel cold, went through a light shower that hit the screen, didn't reach my visor. Right hand only started to get numb on the run from Arundel to Weybridge via Hersham - it's quite a long stretch. legs - no numbness. I thought I would hate it after Harriet and had already mentally traded it in but actually I had a blast today (thanks Spindizzy!) it does the speeds, it accelerates well, it is comfortable it is fun. It does everything I need it to. Photos to follow....
  7. 12 points
    Well, I’ve started my next project, a Messerschmitt 109E-4 So far the pilot, cockpit and engine are done, all the internal bits painted. This is the first aircraft kit I’ve built where the pilot can actually hold the joystick. Normally the arms are nowhere near. Bigger surprise, the feet touch the rudder pedals.
  8. 11 points
    Been off the radar for a good few months but not lost my interest in two wheels, picked up this beauty earlier today. 12 plate in mint condition with a few extras and 11k on the clock. Royal Enfield has gone but NC and all the other stuff still in the garage so it's a tight squeeze.
  9. 10 points
    My favourite bike at the Scottish Bike show on Saturday was this Gold Wing GL1000 adventure bike. An amazing example of custom building. Although a Gold Wing adventure bike seems a strange idea it didn't look that big next to a BMW GS or Triumph Explorer etc.
  10. 9 points
    Having diagnosed an issue with the countershaft on my CB250 (with the help of the internet) I've decide to have a go at fixing it myself. I think that I know what I'm doing but it still feels a bit daunting splitting the cases etc but, thankfully, the engine removal was fairly straightforward. The gearbox doesn't look too complicated either (famous last words ). Wish me luck!
  11. 9 points
    Sometimes the more perfect the bike the less 'characterful' it is and, somewhat perversely, the less we gel with it. I agree with your comments on the AT, I bought mine as a replacement for the NC and haven't been disappointed, it's got more performance, way better brakes and suspension and a few other better bits. The clincher is that the NC was a great bike but not one I fell in love with, it was like that baggy old sweatshirt that you wear the most but is by no means the thing you wear on a night out. The good news for me is that the AT has the same NC 'bland' DNA in that I don't really give a stuff about it (even though it is the most I've ever spent on a bike) so don't mind using it through the Winter, not being anal about the cleaning (spokes haven't been cleaned since I've owned it to the amazement of AT owners who ask after the spoke issue ), I don't care where I park it (within reason), don't get upset over the odd little ding or scratch and I care even less if some one picks holes in it - yup it's not as good as your GS, nope it won't compete with a KTM EXC off road, yes blue & white ones look better, no I haven't got crash bars and ali boxes, etc, etc So when I get a bit fed up with the 'character' of some of the other bikes I have in the garage or I just want to get somewhere with no fuss, no drama and no hassle, then out comes the AT to remind me how good (and boring) a bike Honda can make and how not making alowances for the bike you're riding but getting on with covering miles at a fair old lick can sometimes be just as much fun. It's a return to form for Honda, a truly great bike and one that will probably sit in my garage for many years ....... but not the one that gets me out just to look at it
  12. 9 points
    Good luck, mate! I second Andywills77 - loads of photos are the way to go. Even better, if you've got a willing camera operator, is to video it (obviously pause during all the thinking times), it won't take as much storage as you imagine. If you do decide to strip the gearbox, get a long piece of wire for each shaft, and carefully thread each washer, gear, etc, on the wire - in the right order and the right way round - as you take them off the shaft.
  13. 9 points
  14. 9 points
  15. 8 points
    Bang on! Allow a little extra time for your journey, don’t treat every ride through traffic like a rehearsal for ‘MadMax 23’ and actually give way to people now and then. It’s amazing how much better life becomes.
  16. 8 points
    A lifetime for me! I haven’t put three chains on one bike since the invention of the ‘O’ ring! So it wouldn’t make financial sense, but it would rid me of the last part of a modern motorcycle that I actually find offensive! I mean, lack of mudguards is annoying, but that’s a lower lever annoyance than grubbing about on my hands and knees in a B&B car park.. But, deep breath and smile, I don’t really do that anymore. I only do multi day rides once or twice a year and a bit of chain maintenance in the workshop is (almost) therapy. Almost. OK, so I lie to myself.. Others (morning Andy ) argue that chain drive is somehow better than either of the alternatives because it’s cheaper. That’s what it is. It’s cheap. Truthfully? It’s cheap and nasty, but some folks can ignore the nasty. Lucky them. Hey! Do you know what? Normally ranting on about chains gets me all ‘How dare those bloody motorcycle companies keep foisting us off with that crap?!’ But, today I don’t care. I have been in a good mood, nay, a brilliant mood, since I learned that racing is to return to Scarborough. How bonkers is that? It’s like a part of my Yorkshire heritage has been returned to me. Here’s the silliest thing, I don’t even mind if I don’t get there this year! So it’s not a purely selfish thing. But I will go, obviously.. Cheers! Simon (the chuffed).
  17. 8 points
    Have no wish to teach anyone the art of egg sucking, but, double check you have every bolt out. Some will screw in through the lower case half and some through the upper. Turn the engine over (on the bench ) and look carefully. It’s amazingly easy to miss one. Don’t ask me how I know..
  18. 8 points
    Hello everybody. I’m back. Cancer’s gone. Leg’s mending slowly. Move on. I stripped all the accessories off Indigo, my blue 2017 750x DCT. Because I thought I was going to have to sell her. (All my bikes have been female) but then I couldn’t bring myself to sell her. She sat in the garage waiting for me to get better. I love her for that. Now I reckon I can ride her again in a couple of months time. - soooooo.... I’m putting all the accessories back on again!!! Not going to bother with the hugger - waste of time. I’d rather retain access to the shock so I can clean it regularly. I found before that with the hugger fitted the shock still got mucky but I couldn’t get to it to clean it. I’ve ordered the Honda rear rack so I can use a Honda top box and panniers. (I sold the Givi ones. Didn’t like them anyway) Anybody got any Honda panniers they want to sell? Centre stand. Yep. Essential for cleaning and chain maintenance. Crash bars. Yep, they’ll go back on but I hope I’ll never need them. Look good though. Tutoro chain oiler. Can’t decide. Spray chain lubs are so good these days I’m not sure I need it back on. It was good though and I’ve still got a litre of their lub left so I might refit it. Centech fuse panel. Yep. Definitely. I used to be a sparky so understand it’s necessity to power accessories. Twin fiamma horns. Yep. Essential to wake up dozy drivers. ( why are they always female?) Battery charging cable. Yep. It’s back on already and can be used to power my... Heated clothing controller. Definitely. Toasty warm in the winter. Hand guards. The Givi ones I had before were rubbish. Didn’t keep the wind off adequately and I had to add my own extenders to make them effective. I’ve found Ascerbis Vision Handguards which incorporates a high viz led light for better notice on the road. I’m tempted by them but wondered if anybody has any experience of them? Daytime Riding Lights. I like the Givi S310 Trekker Lights but if I fit the Ascerbis Vision Handguards I could save a hundred squigglies by not needing the DRLs. Does anybody want to buy a little used Peugeot Metropolis Scoot?
  19. 8 points
    Today at the 1066 it was interesting to see a 1936 Triumph alongside a 2018 Triumph. There were quite a few old things there such as the Triumph a Vincent Black Shadow a BSA cafe racer a Honda 400/4 a Z1000 and of course Tex
  20. 7 points
    Bingo Geoff, ruby is indeed a oilfield Himalayan , thought the name was rather apt
  21. 7 points
    It's a while since I had an NC, so I'm not sure I would remember how the panels come off, but could have a look at it, as I live nearby in East Leake. If it is on the road and you could bring it over here we could have a look at it together in my garage. If you want to do that PM me to exchange contact details.
  22. 7 points
    Tex & Sam, sounds like you need to plan a day out down to my lock-up and you can try out a few types and sizes for how easy they are to push around, reach the ground on, store your sandwiches on and even try your fur lined aprons on - oo'er missus. You may even be able to try one or two out if I'm feeling brave and insurance works out. It will be a bit like a dealer demo day without the PCP offers Of course not many scooters and certainly no new bling like wot you peeps are used so you might have to use a dollop of imagination but I can provide free tea and biscuits. Rocker, you and Sue would be more than welcome but I'm afraid the only Honda on the fleet is the oh too tall AT although I do have a Honda generator you could fire up if you want
  23. 7 points
    Hi guys and girls , rode the Himalayan yesterday seriously impressed , suspension that actually works brakes ok , travelling along very happily at 60 + , handled very well once I put air in the tyres , sorted wheel alignment and backed of the head bearings ( dealers eh ) been offered a very good deal of brand new under 4 big ones or 100 miler for 3750 , very very tempted , still keeping my well loved NC and of course the rocket machine just need to sell guzzi , and 2 x125,s
  24. 7 points
    Have used the stand a couple of times now to lift the AT and it makes tasks such as replacing chain & sprockets and brake pads so much easier. Here I have both wheels about 18" off the ground which brings the working area to a much more comfortable height for my old bones. Completed the chain change by using my new chain splitter/rivet head flaring tool. First time I've fitted a riveted chain myself and this tool made it a doddle. Only problem now is that the rear wheel doesn't turn freely, seems to be binding on the new brake pads a lot more than I would expect. Maybe a combo of new pads, not having the wheel alignment perfect and having a hand brake caliper means that everything needs to be aligned much more accurately although don't recall a similar problem on my NC and I changed the rear pads a couple of times on that. I left it last night and will come back to it fresh this evening, perhaps I've not got the wheel spacers in correctly, no doubt will be something simple.
  25. 7 points
    Rider / Driver awareness will make you far safer than a loud exhaust. I do London every day myself from Southampton, 900 miles / week and find that loud exhausts just piss me off (even as a bike rider) and do very little for safety. Good road position and awareness are far better.
  26. 7 points
    Today I fitted a Koso Mini-3 plus a silver Koso handlebar stem clamp which has a special slot for the device so it looks like it’s OE. Wired it directly into the optional harness. I used the three-wire line but I had to reposition one of the subharness wires so that there is constant low-voltage power into the device when the ignition is off, then the other two wires are simply for switched/ignition on and ground. The device has a nice big clock, digital temp gauge and volt read-out. The voltage display function can also be set to alert you if the voltage drops below a level which you can choose, with the alert presenting as a flashing voltage display. Clever. i also fitted a pair of auxiliary cree led lamps; a flood one on the left angled out towards the kerb slightly and on the right a spot beam angled flat and forwards. They are wired into the subharness onto an ingnition live only, so no high/low beam, which is what I was after. They were £23 for the pair from Amazon and I am impressed with the build quality and beams - time will tell how they fare. They came with brackets which I have mounted onto the front top mudguard points - to do this I purchased some new 40mm long bolts (OE are 30mm) with the extra 10mm being used to accommodate the bracket and some rubber spacers - I added the spacers to push the lights out a bit and thus clear the fork legs, and also to soak up vibrations. They are mounted lower than I wanted but mounting options on the NCS are limited and I was conscious not to mount in a way which could drown out the indicators. I may move the R spot light high up onto the R side of the handlebars (near the mirror stalk) in the future as I think it will be better placed there for raising visibility especially when filtering. later this week I will be fitting a connector for a new pair of Gerbing heated gloves (currently on offer from Gerbing website for £100), I will fit this to a switched live on the remaining subharness connector which I think is better than an always-on direct-on-battery line which is the intended set-up. The gloves have three heat settings with the switch being on the L glove so that there is no separate controller to mount. This means I will be able to remove my Oxford heated grips which I don’t think are working too well (assume resistance somewhere as take a long time to heat up and then the heat is somewhat uneven and only really effective on max); this will also free up some handlebar space and permit fitting of Puppy Grips for more comfort. For this electrical stuff I purchased connector sets, fuses, shrink wrap, crimper tool and heat gun. Total outlay for these sundries was about £40 but well worth it as the wiring is neat and secure. I had a bit of spare 12v wiring and sheaths etc. so did not need to purchase these. I purchased the required subharness relay from Amazon for £2.50 compared with £15 for the OE Honda one. it works fine BUT it is not as compact as the Honda one so it sits proud in the fuse box and the fuse box cover now doesn’t fit. I will prob secure the cover with a rubber band for now but will see if I can get a better fitting relay sometime; the Honda price is ridiculous and why don’t they supply the relay with the subharness anyway? Bit naughty Mr Honda ...: 🤨 i also plan to fit a Bluetooth tyre pressure monitoring system; there are some good ones on Amazon for about £40. Michelin do a set-up for £80. Also on my handlebars I have a Bluetooth controller for my iPhone (battery powered) which can vary volume and move backwards or forwards between tracks - I have fitted some cheap Bluetooth headphones into my helmet (rechargeable internal battery) which cost a tenner from eebay; the controller was £13 from Amazon. I like to listen to radio 4 when I travel, sometimes music, and other things like audio books. I now also use Alpine Race silicon earplugs which are amazing! £13 from Amazon and probably the best purchase of all - they have a nice little air pressure channel in them which also permits sound from the helmet speakers into my ears whilst still cancelling out the wind noise. My previous non-electric farkles which are mainly winterisation mods are doing a great job, especially the vinyl flaps I placed to keep crud off the rear shock and links. I will fit an additional mudflap to the fender extender at some point. following notice from this very forum, I got some wd40 chain stuff from Aldi. The chain cleaner was very effective; I have relubed with wd40 chain wax and will report back how that fares. In about 10k miles time I will replace the chain and sprockets and at that point I’ll fit a tutoro chain oiler - probably about 18 months to go ~ish. The only mechanical mod I wish was possible with the NC range is shaft drive, something which I think has totally disappeared from new sub-1L bikes (am I right?). I have shaft drive on my 1982 CX500EC and it is bloody brilliant. My mate has it on his two Pan Europeans too. Oh well. I’ve been recording mpg’s since early jan and overall getting 85mpg without even trying. Best tank was 239 miles at 93mpg. That is really terrific and helps pay all of these farkles. I’ll have to pay me dues for the forum then I’ll post some pics in the gallery to show off, I mean demonstrate, all of my handiwork. I’ll also be able to get hold of a proper nc700s wiring diagram which would be useful ... 😉 no riding this weekend but back on the commute tomorrow , au revoir, Will
  27. 7 points
  28. 7 points
    The MZ chaincase was a brilliant idea. It consisted of a plastic casing around the rear sprocket with a pair of rubber tubes connecting it to the engine. The chain was therefore completely protected. Old DDR chains were crap. The rollers were made from strips of steel folded round - so they had a seam. They would eventually break up. But once you had fitted a good chain - an O ring chain was unnecessary - it would last forever. I used to lube the chain every six months or so but that wasn't really needed.
  29. 7 points
    Even though I've been known to potter about on something orange with legsheilds, I'm with you on this one for the moment Rocker although 'ever' is a long time I'm pretty sure that if I reach the stage where I am unable to ride a 'proper bike', and the choice is a scooter or nowt, then I will go for a scooter (or whatever contraption passes for one by then) as, for me, life without two wheels will be slightly less fulfilling. I had a colleague who was a sports bike rider since before they were called sportsbikes (he used to hack around with Roger Marshall on big bore Suzuki's and Kawasaki's in his youth) and finally jacked in riding and flogged his ZXr900 just after he tretired back up to his native Yorkshire a few years back as a dodgy hip made it excriatingly painful. I recall suggesting that rather than stop riding he got something a bit easier to climb on and off and a bit more sedate and his words were something along the lines 'I'm not pttering about on some old man's bike'. I always thought it was such a pity that he is missing out on the joys of biking just because of a fixed mindset. Mind you he always used to say to me 'you can always tell a Yorkshireman but you can't tell him much!' so perhaps that had a lot to do with it
  30. 7 points
    I am sold on it! 300 miles already done
  31. 7 points
    On my Deauville with a standard Honda top box and with the oversize lids fitted to the panniers I've often carried not only a diving helmet, but also the rest of my diving suit AND my Premier XPK drum kit. Tex is right about the top box. I found that when I put my 40lbs diving boots in the panniers rather than the top box the handling improved considerably. And when I put one boot in each pannier, rather than both of them in the right or left one, the Deau cornered like she was on rails. The only downside was the fact that the front wheel was rarely in touch with the tarmac.
  32. 7 points
    I can strongly recommend the buttered chicken curry kit if you are going.
  33. 7 points
    Soft panniers would work.Very military despatch rider...
  34. 7 points
    Poppet wants a naked sports bike. Poppet would also like the body that could fit in leathers and cope with one Poppet is also going to step away from the wine glass....
  35. 6 points
    There are still those that hark back to the Rocker and Mods era and see modern day bikes in the same vain and apply attitudes about the type of riders that are well out dated..." Motorcycles are ridden by proper bikers where as scooters are for softies and wannabe/has beens." From a technical point of view, scooters in the main (not all) are fairly practical, and in extremes of weather are more comfortable to ride. When I rode all year to work, after about September and before April, the only other bikes seen regularly on the road were scooters or mopeds. Who wants to see all the wiring and pipework around the engine, after all you don't drive around in your car with the bonnet open so you can see the workings do you? Who needs to have to clean it all too? Each to their own, they are all bikes but to my mind the practicalities of a scooter vastly outweigh the aspects of a 'proper' bike Scooters have a bit more style...simple as that. Any bike is better than no bike too.
  36. 6 points
    All good inside apart from the usual seized cam chain tensioner.
  37. 6 points
  38. 6 points
    WOW! Cables prices have risen.
  39. 6 points
    Nicely done Andy. I am sticking to 1:48 at the moment as I find the bits are too teeny at 1:72. Currently struggling to get an airbrush to work! I am building Russian early WW2 stuff at the moment - I have a thing for i 15 biplanes!
  40. 6 points
    I went into Aldi for some chain cleaner and lube, I came out with a bird bath, a kite, a paddling pool and some donuts. I completely failed to get any cleaner or lube!
  41. 6 points
    @Grumpy Meltdown : are you really advocating going to a store, finding the item you want and then absconding to buy online? C’mon, that is not fair. Perhaps once you’ve bought one (from a store) then making subsequent purchases online but to do that from the outset is really taking advantage of those who do provide actual shops and probably running them out of business. declaration: I do not own nor have any interest in any commercial sales/retail at all, I work for the NHS, but I have a good sense of fairness.
  42. 6 points
    I think, like Sam, that you'll be surprised by just how good a scoot is. After owning almost 50 bikes I'm now on my third scoot and my mileage has gone up significantly, mainly because you can ride comfortably in just about any weather. It's different though, and not for everybody, but at least try one and judge for yourself. I was a scoot hater and I'm not really sure why I even bought one although I always had a feeling that they could be fun to tour on. Turns out they not only tour but they're lightweight, fun to ride and keep you at sensible speeds, without feeling slow. I still go out on my motorcycle and, in some respects, there's nothing to compare with a good bike but, for daily riding and all round practicality, the scoot just wins.
  43. 6 points
    Take a mirror. All the shiney suits are a worry but the ones with no reflection are more dangerous. Andy
  44. 6 points
    That's a lot of chain lube, fair play to her for spending that much on your hobby
  45. 6 points
    I'm pretty much there with my Landy so yesterday I got out and actually used it in anger.
  46. 6 points
    I've never had an issue with a top boxes on any of my bikes. Not while doing --censored-- mph down the motorway or on blowy stretches like Glen Coe/Rannoch Moor. I've had more 'scares' with hard panniers catching the wind ... or the back of my legs while wheeling the bike ... but that's it. I generally try to stick to the loading value (10Kg with Givi IIRC) when doing my shopping; and off course I can get some stuff in the 'cubby hole'. Even given the levering effect that the rack has, I can't imagine that the load on the rear end is any worse than that of carrying a pillion. PS: Back in 1984, on the day I was made redundant, I rode home with my metal toolbox bungied to the pillion seat of my CX500EC. The rack wouldn't have taken the weight and I reckoned the wee bit of 'give' offered by the soft seat would help stabilise the load. What I failed to factor in was the way the tools shifted within the box when I leant into a corner. My bum cheeks were fair puckering up on that run!!
  47. 6 points
    As your in Aberdeen I guess your just about far enough away from Sam to be safe posting that.😂
  48. 6 points
    Morning Geoff, nice wheels! And I’m, sort of, getting used to the screen. I think. The top box? My objection to those goes much deeper than mere aesthetics. They can be the cause of shocking instability. The following isn’t meant to be a ‘sucking eggs’ tutorial, but there’s a few new or inexperienced riders on the forum who might benefit from learning that the best (from a handling point of view) location for carrying luggage on a motorcycle is within a triangle formed by the two wheel spindles and the top of the rider’s helmet. Note that the triangle includes the ‘frunk’ (and you thought Honda just made that by accident, eh?) and a tank bag. Note also how the top box is the furthest part possible from the triangle.. Yes, I fully accept that they’re useful. And, yes, I actually had one on my Integra. But I approach them with extreme caution. Kind of the same way an elephant puts his trunk in a crocodile’s mouth - verrry carefully.
  49. 5 points
    If people can't see the huge red lorry I used to drive, the one with multi-tone sirens, blue lights, reflective stripes, camera to record stupid driving etc. I very much doubt half a Honda Jazz engine with even an open megaphone will make the slightest difference. It will however annoy everyone like a two year old with a vuvuzala and get them ****ed off with all of us. A Sound bomb horn is possibly what you need. Andy
  50. 5 points
    The box is all yours, I'll have the contents. Match made in heaven, you name the time, I'll name the services.
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