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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 31/12/11 in all areas

  1. 32 points
    Please allow me to relate to everyone a little tale which should give you a little emotional lift. I Had been corresponding with a forum member prior to and after the purchase of my new bike. He had offered valuable advise and a solution to my dislike of spoked wheels and tubed tyres. He had changed the wheels on his T100 for cast wheels from a Street Twin. Great fix but was looking a tad expensive and being a “tight Macam” was causing me much sucking of air through the teeth as I tried to find some. Said forum member contacted me to say he had found some on a well-known auction site that were definitely worth a punt, how jolly nice of him so give them a punt we did and low and behold we won them at a bargain price. Things then started to go a little wrong at this point. The wheels were originally advertised as being able to have a courier arranged but on contacting the seller he said he had changed the ad to collect only. As I live up in the North Pennines and the wheels were located where they eat things like jellied eels and pie and mash I smelled a big rat and thought the seller was trying to back out due to the bargain price I had achieved, as it turned out I was wrong and the problems were mainly down to his communication skills. I contacted my friendly forum member who without any hesitation said “don’t worry I will collect them for you” I was absolutely astounded. So as not to drag this out let me tell you briefly how this now went. This gentleman did a round trip of over 100 miles to collect these wheels, he was kept waiting at the seller's house for a considerable time. He then arranged a courier, packed the wheels very carefully and dropped them off at the courier, they have just been delivered to my house. This show of kindness and pure generosity of spirit has had a huge effect on me and restored my somewhat jaded view of human nature. Now every time when I go out on my bike I will be constantly reminded of this wonderful act (will be a lot less likely to move this one on as it does have a special meaning now). Who was this man I hear you ask, TEX, that's who. If I may I would like to use this very friendly forum to publicly thank Tex for this truly outstanding help and assistance. I have never met him a probably never will, that is indeed my loss. Geoff.
  2. 29 points
    Collected Victor early this morning due to rain forecast later in the day. Got it home in the dry except for the couple of miles. Still a few farkles to be transferred from the NC
  3. 26 points
    Only pic of the new to me AT, did about 120 miles on it yesterday, most of that two up and very pleased with it so far. Feels similar to my NC700X DCT but better in every way, apart from no frunk. Obviously performance is significantly better but other than that it's the suspension that really sets them apart almost immediately, so much more subtle yet communicative. I'll try to remember to post some thoughts once I've put a few more miles on it but, first impressions are good
  4. 25 points
    Well the Integra swingarm is installed on my 2016 750X and I think it looks loads better than the original steel one. It went straight on without any problems. If anyone else is tempted to do the same bear in mind you also need the Integra wheel spindle and chainguard, everything else (shock, linkage, brake caliper etc) fits just fine.
  5. 22 points
    Kent M/Cs delivered Sue's new bike this afternoon. I'm ;looking forward to hear her opinion on how it feels to ride when weather permitting she takes it out for the first time tomorrow. Not sure what happened with the middle picture but if you click on it it should open in the proper size
  6. 21 points
    This last week has been a decent one, not least because my dear old GT 750 has passed its 32nd MOT in a row. Passed without comment to, not bad for a 34 year old. I took this pic to celebrate
  7. 21 points
    Well the GS is now at the dealers - and I'm temporarily bikeless, sob, sob! Thanks for all your support and understanding of the process whereby another change of bike starts off as vague musings and, after some serious agonising over the finances, progresses through to all out new bike lust! I notice none of you tried to stop me, but maybe I'm just regarded as a lost cause due to my past history! The picture below is the same as the new RS I am getting. My existing Shad luggage will fit on without any mods required, and the bike is a little lower and lighter than the GS, and to my mind quite a bit better looking. The fact that I will no longer be in the seemingly despised GS rider fraternity, and will hopefully be a little more anonymous on a much less commonly seen bike, is another bonus!
  8. 21 points
    So, in the last 10,000 miles on the little CRF, what's happened, what went well and what's gone wrong. During the first winter, after the rear tyre was all but worn out (3500 miles), I removed both the standard tyres,and replaced them with Heidenau K60's. These are a 50/50 tyre (road/trail) and I have to say I'm very pleased with them. Good consistent grip and stability on the road, with enough bite for a bit of light trail riding. Not great in mud, something more specialised is required for that, but for Road and mountain tracks, wet or dry they are excellent for me. I am now on my second rear, the first having worn down to 2mm in the centre after 6500 miles. At just over £70 a tyre they are good value. The front is less than 1/3 worn. Mechanically, nothing has gone wrong. From slogging along trails to buzzing up the motorway at an indicated 75, (really 68) it's proved to be solid and reliable. It's not fast, but is very capable of keeping up with traffic and taking sensible overtaking opportunities. Being a small engine you re up and down the 'box a bit, but it's a pleasure to use and one of the slickest I've ever used. The engine is reasonably smooth, and definitely improved as the miles increased. It's a single so you know it's running, but for me it's not intrusive and that's after a few 450 to 500 mile days. It's best between 4000 and 8500 rpm. It will run as low as 3000, but you need a gentle throttle hand to avoid engine 'shunt'. It runs up to 10500 rpm but it's not necessary unless you want to avoid a gear change during an overtake. The first (8000 mile) service was £89:00, it's just an oil change. I have had a new front brake disc under warranty, but that might have a bit (ok a lot) to do with me whizzing round mountain twisties in France in the company of some sports bikes. The disc was blue 😉. You could argue it should be able to cope, but I put it down to self inflicted injury. Oh and the ABS is excellent and works well. In terms of consumables I've gone through two rear tyres and one front, brake pads are still fine, but I did pay extra for new fronts when the disc was changed at 8000 miles. The originals were about 1/2 worn. I've fitted a new chain and sprocket set at 9500 miles, which I'm a bit surprised at, but there's no Cush drive on the rear wheel and singles give chains a harder time of it. It will be interesting to see how long the top quality DID chain will last compared to the OEM one. Over the period it's averaged between 85 to 90 mpg. I can get 190 miles out of a tank and there's still a bit over a litre left in it. Comfort wise, it's no Goldwing, but is ok for about 120 to 150 miles now I've fitted the sheepskin seat cover to it. Certainly the ergonomics are excellent for me (6'1" 84kg 34" inside leg), but the seat is an inch taller than that on an Africa twin, so it's not for everyone. The suspension is soft but well damped and it just glides over road imperfections and speed bumps. Ideal for the state of our current roads. It's no KTM though and responds best to gentle riding off road and can get in a bit of a knot if you try belting along. The fairing and screen are also very effective, and mine's been improved further by the addition of an adjustable air blade at the top. Overall, an excellent lightweight bike that has served me well over long distances (2800 miles over 17 days in France), can carry all my kit easily for camping weekends and hotelling (is that a word🤔) over longer periods. I have a simple rack on the back from Honda Thailand and a tank bag system I made myself. Finally, the quality of finish seems very good, and is holding up well, despite what I've thrown at it and occasionally thrown it at on a trail😳. (There're are two sorts of trail riders, those that have fallen down, and those that are about to😁). And you can pick it up easily. A good, solid, old school traillie, that can tour, scratch, nip to the shops and bounce along off road fairly well while revealing it's and the riders limited abilities.😂 And it's very cheap to run, I'm still enjoying it.
  9. 20 points
    Today we went to Kent M/Cs to see Sue's new bike which is awaiting PDI. The great news is that when Sue tried it for size she found that the slimmer frame than her current 650 meant that she doesn't need to have it lowered. Here are a couple of photos but sadly due to my phone camera not being too good and the poor lighting in the workshop means that the Denim Blue colour has come out looking black.
  10. 19 points
    Sue picked this new CB650F up yesteday. Unfortunately the photos don't do the metalic colour justice
  11. 18 points
    Today Sue ordered the new CB650R in blue subject to it being able to be lowered . They are due in the dealers in January apparently and Kent M/Cs have put her name against the first blue one in. The good thing is once she gets it that will make it my turn for a new one.😀😀
  12. 18 points
    Ok, ok I know... But having tried really hard to make it work for us the Kawasaki Vulcan 900 is going. You're all aware of the numerous ergo issues we've had, we thought we'd got it sussed but on longer rides we're struggling. Tis why I've been a little quiet of late. We've suffered considerable financial loss but we've just done a fantastic deal with a "proper" manufacturer who cares about our plight. Here it is then, we get it next Thursday and are really stoked Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider
  13. 18 points
    As Mark says, always a topic of debate and everyone has an opinion. Opinions are like ar$eholes, everyone has one but you don't usually want to hear it. Here's mine. Octane rating of itself doesn't mean much in this context. It is a rating for the resistance to "knock" (or pinking etc). In the broadest terms providing the fuel you use meets the minimum required by the engine it is satisfactory (in the case of the NC it's 91RON, regular unleaded in Europe is 95RON, super usually 97-99Ron ballpark). Normal combustion is a gradual process, the spark starts it off and the mixture burns progressively across the cylinder in a controlled manner, it depends on speed/load but the burn might take around 45deg of crank rotation. Knock is when the last part of the mixture in the chamber, which is exposed to increasing temperature and pressure as the rest burns, spontaneously reacts before the flame front reaches it. The mixture undergoes chemical changes which turn it into stuff which will just react on its own without the need for an ionisation source (flame). This results in a significant amount of mixture all reacting at once which gives a very high rate of pressure rise and the sound of a knock (or a tinkling rattling sort of sound, hence the term "pinking"). Out of interest this is typically 6kHz or harmonics, 12kHz etc due to typical dimensions in combustion chambers. Mild or trace knock is not really damaging, it's more an annoyance if you can hear it. Heavy knock can cause damage due to fatigue, it will pit the alum pistons and in extreme will break ring lands. Also it tends to upset the boundary layer of gas resulting in higher heat transfer to the piston and head, which of itself can lead to other more serious and dramatic problems. Octane rating is how resistant the fuel is to doing this, if it doesn't knock then it doesn't knock. there are different ways to test the fuel to arrive at this rating, different speed/load/temperature conditions used in a specific test engine by the fuel companies, and these methods arrive at different numbers, the one we see here in Europe is Research Octane Number (RON), the other common one is Motor Octane Number (MON) and in the USA they refer to the average of these , (RON+MON)/2. Ron is usually 7 or 8 numbers higher than MON so 91RON will be typically 87 (R+M)/2, so be aware when reading stuff from USA writers. The rating actually is a comparison to a theoretical mixture of 2 specific hydrocarbons, iso-octane which is a straight chain molecule and quite resistant to knock (defined as 100 Octane), and n-heptane which is branched and will very easily knock (defined as zero octane). Thus 95RON behaves like a mixture of 95% iso-octane and 5% n-heptane (it isn't a mixture of these, but it behaves like it). Higher octane fuel allows the engine designers to use higher compression ratios (in simplest terms) in order to get better efficiency (fuel economy and/or power). Using a higher rating fuel doesn't per se give any significant benefits, but it doesn't cause any harm. An incidental aspect however is that the formulation of hydrocarbons which make it less prone to knock happen to make it very slightly denser and very slightly higher calorific value (the energy content per kg). This means that your litre of 98RON will offer a little more energy than a litre of 95RON, but differences are small, typically perhaps 43.5MJ/kg instead of 42.7MJ/kg, so 2 or 3% more energy per litre. This may just about offset the oncost of the fuel per litre. What you do often notice (if you're tuned in to such things) is the higher octane fuels respond slightly better to transients, and with carb engines it tends to be less prone to icing. Transient response is a very engine dependent factor, some engines are quite sensitive but others you can't tell any difference, it just depends how good the combustion system is. This is where iridium plugs also can influence things, it all affects how consistently the combustion is initiated, the first 5-10% of the mass burned. It is often the case that the higher RON fuels have somewhat more effective additive packs for cleaning and anti-oxidation etc, so they can be useful in system maintenance. I always recommend you try some. You may notice some difference, maybe not. You may measure a couple of percent better fuel economy but maybe not. If you like it then fine, otherwise just use 95RON. Personally I find the NC doesn't respond to the RON in any noticeable way, but I have found some tank fills have been "nicer" than others though not related particularly to RON. I do have a Suzuki Cappuccino (650cc turbo) car which definitely responds nicely to V-Power. You pays your money ..................................
  14. 17 points
    Just thought I would drop my own experience of the 16K service in here. The price I was quoted by a Honda dealer was £488 for the 16K service on a DCT 2016 NC750X. This prompted me to look at doing it myself. I ordered the oil and filters online and had them delivered for around £60. A quick google video search uncovered some great clips showing how to change the oil and filters (DCT, so two filters needed). A separate video showed the air filter change (which was the biggest faff by far). In total I spent around an hour doing these jobs. Sure I also spent some time trawling this forum for advice (which was invaluable) and finding videos...but now I have the knowledge, I can do the next one in less time. Whilst I was at it I changed both tyres and the front pads, again I was able to see a video of changing the pads. This took me around 2 hours. I've changed plenty of tyres before, but had never changed pads. The pads turned out to be more straightforward than I had previously imagined. I know some people don't like getting their hands dirty, that's fair enough. I also realise that some people are too scared to tackle these jobs and prefer a 'professional' to do it. That's fair enough too, as is the convenience of paying someone else to do it. Personally I enjoyed doing the job myself and I enjoyed saving my hard earned cash too. My main driver is the satisfaction of doing it myself and knowing that it has been done properly. I also got my son to help me, he is just starting out in his motorcycle career and has recently bought his first 125. The videos give you confidence in what you are doing. I have yet to tackle the valve clearances, but looking at yet another video of this it looks very straightforward...more so than changing the air filter in fact. I'll change the coolant at the same time as the radiator needs to be removed to make the valve clearance check easier. At 17K I'm on my third back tyre, second front tyre, second set of front brake pads and second chain. I had one back tyre changed by a local mechanic who has sadly retired now. That prompted me to change the second tyre myself, particularly as my Honda dealer could only do it in 2 weeks time unless I took the back wheel in. If I have to take the back wheel out and drive to the Dealer's place in my car then I may as well source the tyre myself and change it myself and save money at the same time. I guess I should thank them for not being able to complete a simple job in under 2 weeks as that single failure has given me the confidence to tackle it myself and save a fortune too! Once I did one tyre I thought that I may as well do the rest myself too. For the record I found that Michelin tyres go on more easily than either Dunlop or Pirelli.
  15. 17 points
    The voltmeter that I ordered from Chinaland arrived today and, after a few minutes with soldering iron and wire crimpers, here it is fitted to the Enfield. I'm pretty chuffed with the installation as I wanted something that looks like OE and I think I've nailed it. Eat your heart out Fred
  16. 17 points
    Passenger side leccy window in the car stopped working after going to Tesco (I don't blame Tesco for that, just most other things). Checking fuses etc drew a blank and was resigning myself to taking door cards off, real pain. But first, let's check t'interweb. Toyota forum pops up with "passenger window not working" topic, excellent. About the second post says "Have you accidentally pushed the button which disables the passenger window?" Ermmmmmm, what button? I've owned the car 18yrs and don't remember a button. Go out to car...………………………… who the f*** put that button there? I'm sure it's never been there before. Push it once, and passenger window works. Miracle. Hangs head in shame
  17. 17 points
    Well, its done. I have ordered a Matt Cynos Grey Metallic 2018 model SH300i. With screen & colour matched top box. It does appear that after many years of denial, I am a Scooterist at heart. If I get on well with it the Suzuki Address will also go Probably be in around mid December. I will have an original Honda NCX rear rack and top box to sell somewhere as I PX'd the NC without it. Also an original short screen. I was offered such a good price for my NC and free accessories on the new SH, I couldn't say no. Still going to hang about here and annoy you lot at the meets if you will allow a plastic pig to share the same piece of tarmac
  18. 17 points
    For the members who have a nervous disposition to scooters please don't not read any further---------Yesterday afternoon off from doing jobs--so even though it was spitting rain--I went to the Big City of Preston Del Sol-- Yamaha Agents !!! "hang on a sec"-- having trouble getting leg over --the same as several other members of this forum-- it time for looking/test riding a scooter--No J300 in stock so went for a now pouring down test ride--the paperwork took ages and ages--did you know you can only test ride up to 70 years of age !!! I was shown the keyless ignition--shown all the relevant bits--yes beer goes under seat--fags go in here--then I gave the demo bike a good check over before riding--always do this safety check--yes kicked both tyres for exact pressure--set of slowly--But after just a few yards--the scooter devil comes out in me --I'm off weaving here --filtering there--breaking speed limits--overtaking on pavements--pomping horns--leaning forward and head down--just like all the proper scooter riders do--it was quite exciting--I couldn't see for most of the time because of steamed up visor--but never mind --not important--got back to garage--absolutely soaked through and through--like a drowned rat--walked in like John Wayne after getting off his horse--the seat on scooter is so wide--stopping at lights--very unsafe--could just about touch the floor on tiptoes--that was the only thing I could fault the scooter on for me--and I'm 6'6"--sorry 5'9". A stupid low price offered for my bike--so no point in part exchanging--£9635 otr asking price--£500 deposit £41.71 month 36 months--seems ok --- but not for me. Will give you a ring when we get the J300 in to test ride--ok thanks--- hit all the works traffic getting home--crazy drivers--huge puddles everywhere--cars swerving around them it was chaos--but I was glad to back on my NC750S to be able to put both feet firmly on the ground--and ride properly --sensibly like all good motorbikers should. Home took all wet rags off outside --neighbours are used to seeing me nacked by now--the kids just throw stone at me and shout abuse--but the wobbly old woman will not let me in-house until naked as a jaybird---- just got in the lovely hot shower and my mobile phone rang--she answered it--shouted up it's Chris--who's ****** Chris? The ****** Chris wants to know why you did not leave the keyless ignition--key thingy you put safely in the top pocket of jacket!!! how would I ??remember that--so do you--ME--want to take it back now his manager is going apeshit not leaving it?? ****** No-- I will bring it back tomorrow --so I think I may be banned from yet another bike shop--never mind still a few unguarded and unaware ones left for me to play with.
  19. 16 points
    Finally got out on the Himalayan today, couldn't make it yeserday as planned due to last minute pressures of work ......... what is the world coming to! As the sales guy had given me a provisional decent price for my V7 I thought I would ride that the 30+ miles over to Moto Corsa in Gillingham Dorset and let him have a look at it while I hack the Himalayan around and see what I think. The demo bike was in white and fitted with ali sandwich boxes but they didn't interfere much with getting my leg over, deffo would not be on my list of add ons though. Sitting on the bike first impressions are good if a little confusing, really low seat height, nice and light, surpisingly modern dash, slick if basic handlebar controls, weird round mirrors and slightly too straight handlebars. The bike had literally just come back from another demo ride (the chap, a Fazer 600 owner wasn't impressed) so didn't need warming up, it started instantly on the button and settled to a quiet tickover, no noticeable vibes and quiet but pleasant burble from the exhaust. After the usual run through the controls from the dealer guy I had a quick feel for where the clutch bit, adjusted the mirrors and headed off. On the move, second impression was rather disspaointing for me, it hasn't really got any of the Enfield character that I know from my efi 500, no real thump, not even as much as my old MT660 single. It's actually pretty vibe free, pulls okay but feels much more linear in terms of where it makes power. Let's get performance out of the way first; this bike ain't quick! in fact I wouldn't think it's got any more outright performance than my 500 efi (the efi actually has a higher quoted hp and torques), as an example, just after I left the bike shop I was following a car at about 50/55 on a decent A road and wasn't confident enough to go for an overtake even though the road was clear. A few miles later I had gotten familair enough to believe that I would probably have been okay as it's quite happy at 60+ ish but there isn't a a huge amount of acceleration past that. I did about 6 miles on the dual carriageway A300 and saw 80mph on a downhill section but it dropped to 65mph on a fairly steep uphill and U had to go down to 4th to get it back to 70 and. At least is felt planted and the motor reasonably smooth during this, 65/70 on a long dual carriageway stint would be boring but fine. Handling seemed fine, I obviously didn't push it but the Pirelli M60 tyres gave me no funny moments whether on fast (relatively!) sweepers or the many back lane hairpins. The weather was dry but an early drizzle had left some roads damp however, apart from being careful on a few of the lanes with moss down the middle, the H handled well at all times. I did have one slightly strange moment when going into a 40 mph slightly tight corner, the toe of my boot touched down. I wasn't riding with my toes on the pegs but was no way pushing on, it's just because the pegs are so low for 'trail' bike, part of the reason why the riding position is so roomy even for me at 6ft. I doubt it would be an issue in normal use unless you were desperately trying to hang onto the tail of a well ridden 125! Brakes are a tale of two halves; the rear is one of the best levers I've used. Nice large pedal area, positioned under my foot perfectly and bags of feel and stopping power, perfect for me as I prefer to use the rear rather than the front when not pushing on. The front is hilarious! I tend to take magazine reviews with a pinch of salt, particularly when reviewing less fashinable bikes, however all I read mentioned the front brake and they're not worng. The first time I gave it my usual two finger gentle squeeze to shave off a couple of mph I actually thought I must have thought about using the brake and then not bothered, nothing happened, even the front end barely dipped! Once I got used to using all four fingers and giving a proper squeeze it wasn't too bad, it seemed to have a decent amount of feel but always harder to meter out braking force when you have to use a full handful rather than a couple of little digits. No idea why RE decided to make the brake significantly worse than on my efi but take it from me, it is. As a comparison, when I rode off on my Guzzi V7 after the test ride, I dipped the brake with two fingers at the first set of lights and it felt like I was prodding a fearsome sportsbike set up in comparison. Comfort was really good although I was on it for less than an hour, about 35 miles. I did feel that the seat locks me a bit in one position which may become uncomfortable on longer trips but absolutely no issue on this short ride. The suspension is quite soft without being wallowy or bottoming out and handled pot holes and rough roads nicely. I hated the screen, I was wearing an open face helmet and got full buffet smack bang in the face, I much prefer a naked bike and had way less noise and buffeting on my way over on the V7 at 60/75 than on the Himalayan at 50/55. Really not needed on something with this power and would be the first thing to go if I get one. I think a few agree as I saw two parked up out front when I got back that had both had screens removed and neat little number plates tacked on in front of the clocks. The bars to me seemed a slight odd angle as well, a little straight compared to the slightly swept back Guzzi and other nakeds I've ridden but probably something I would get used to and seemed ok for the tiny bit of standing I tried. On that subject, the only 'off road' I managed was to negotiate a couple of grass verge/islands on deserted T junctions. Ground clearance seemed ok but it did stall several times at very low rpm, rider error as I was expecting/hoping for the RE thud thud cement mixer type plod that is almost impossible to stall. It always restarted instantly on the button and a whiff of revs and slip the very light clutch and it was fine, I would like to try one on a gentle green lane as I think it will be fun. Other bits worth mentioning; the rear seat comes off by using the key and then the front seat can also be simply popped off as well, no bolts to undo as teh AT and many other two seat bikes. A proper tool kit under the rear seat and a bit of room under front for thin waterproofs, etc. The bike even comes with a can of touch up spray paint! The digital compass is another bit of fun, for some reason it shows 'initialising' until the fuel guage gets down to 3/4 full, I was warned of this by the dealer chap and sure enough, as the guage ran down the compass came on line, just in time to help me navigate out of the wilds of Dorset .... not. The rear rack and tank mounted side racks would be enough for me to carry a weeks worth of kit and the metal tank makes a magnetic tank bag a doddle. Concluding; The dealer offered me £4k for the V7 and I was actually going to swap it + £199 for a brand new Himalayan but; a} the ride over on the V7 reminded me that I do like it after all ........ and it really does look pretty b} although the H is actually a bit better than I thought (in almost every aspect) it, for me at least, is missing the Enfield character that I like. I'm sure it's one of those bikes that the more you ride it, the more you like it and, when I get one, I think it will probably be my 'go to bike' for winter and dodgy weather rides but for now I'll jsut think about it. So I didn't go for it this time but may well in the not too distant future. In fact it may be the very first bike to ever tempt me to buy brand new, I mean at £4199 on the road how much can you lose
  20. 16 points
    By the way here's a pic of mine the other evening when we had a nice sunset up in the north east. Mike
  21. 16 points
    Finally got the insurance sorted and now the Monkey has arrived. Now we just need some dry weather to try it out. Seat looks really comfortable take screen shot
  22. 16 points
    This morning my 1992 Yamaha FJ1200 passed 100,000 miles. I bought the bike in 2004 on 15,000 miles. The engine has only ever had routine maintenance and the bike has never failed on me. I've not used the bike for a couple of years but thought I had to get it back on the road. These days I mostly ride my 2006 Suzuki SV650 which is a lot lighter and just a quick in the real world. But the FJ is comfortable, smooth, fast and a real torque monster - an effortless high speed long distance machine.
  23. 16 points
    and this one while I'm trying to work out how to fit them all back in the garage
  24. 16 points
    It started, as expensive things sometimes do, as a way to make a small improvement. The improvement in question? To convert Percy the T100 to full tubeless operation. He had tubeless tyres on ‘tubeless type’ rims, but the spokes meant that inner tubes were required. Inner tubes, while not, exactly, the ‘work of the devil’ are not my favourite things. They belong in history books and museums, along with carburettors and contact breakers, or on classic race bikes.. groan. There were a number of ways of consigning the tubes to their rightful place in the re-cycling centre including, my first thought, a pair of new Alpina wheels. Traditional spoked rims, but with seals fitted to make them airtight. They’re gorgeous, but have got horribly expensive post Brexit and now come out at over £2K. The thought of Christmas in hospital when Mrs T saw the credit card bill put me off those. Next up was one of the ‘sealing kits’ that exist. Affordable and effective it’s what I would do if I really wanted to keep my original rims. Like if I had an Affy Twin, for example. A bit of a chore to fit, but anecdotal evidence suggests they’re reliable enough. A definite ‘contender’. The third option was to change to more ‘modern’ cast wheels. Research suggested that the wheels from a 900 Street Twin would fit and I became interested. Further research showed an eye watering price tag of over £1k. Far cough, Mr Triumph! Then Lady Luck dealt me a winning hand (for once) and I found a pair of almost new (200 miles, only) wheels on an auction site. The ‘starting bid’ was really low and yet had attracted not one single potential buyer. They became mine. A pair of ‘good as new’ wheels for £150? Surely even Mrs T would think that was cheap? Better not ask her though. That sort of money can slip under her radar.. They needed to be picked up from near Heathrow and, two days after I bought them, the works van was passing that way. Lady Luck was truly riding on my pillion on this deal. The Pirelli tyres that Triumph fit are nothing to write home (or here!) about, so some of the money I had ‘saved’ was splashed out on a pair of Avon Spirit ST radials. The stage was nearly set. Right from the first ride I had thought Percy could easily pull another tooth on the gearbox sprocket, but no one sold an 18T front sprocket. In the end, the guys who make the sprockets for the ‘team bikes’ made me a 39T (instead of 41T) rear. As soon as I lifted the wheels out of the box I became excited because it was obvious that a, previously unconsidered, side effect was going to be losing a big chunk of unsprung weight. An impressive 8lbs lost from the rear wheel and 6 from the front. That’s 14lbs of unsprung, rotational mass. To put that in perspective - a friend paid £2.3k for some lightweight wheels for his BMW S1000 and saved under 7 lbs the pair. I think the ‘new look’ rather suits Percy.. The silencers have been left off for a reason, btw, I’m about to re-locate the cat.
  25. 16 points
    Percy the T100 went in for his first service yesterday and I had the choice of loan bikes. Hmm, SH300i (tempting), an Affy Twin DCT (bloody tempting) or the CB1100RS. I chose the CB. Mean looking in black, with gold shocks and plenty of 'bling'. How was it? Very nice! Honda have given it different valve timing on cylinders 1&3 to 2&4 in an effort to give it some 'character' and, on first start up, you're left thinking it has a misfire! The feeling soon goes and it's a model of civility and usability. Plenty of smooth power and enough 'urge' to see you locked up. Engine is a winner. Brilliant to see a good, old fashioned, air cooled lump too. Unrivalled accessibility from that layout, not that you're going to need to get at it very often. The RS comes with a lower handlebar, wide (17") wheels and some very cool piggy back shocks from Showa. This is the 'sporty' retro, then. Those of us old enough to remember when Japanese suspension (and tyres) were just a joke in bad taste will struggle with these shocks. Living proof that Showa are at the very top level now. The brakes, too, are awesome. Plenty of power, and easy to use. Just like the engine then. it's a very low bike (roughly the same as the Triumph, I would guess) and wheeling it about is no problem at all. It carries it's weight well and is as user friendly as a bike can ever be. Would I buy one? If I wasn't totally smitten by the T100 I would certainly think about it - although I think the 'ordinary' CB1100EX is probably even nicer and even more usable. Cheaper too. If you get a chance - try one.
  26. 16 points
    Last year when on a tour I was thinking about the NC tools in the toolkit, and slotted the 2 ring spanners and the oval tube together to be able to tackle the rear wheel spindle if necessary. However when loose they can easily slip apart and you'll end up losing knuckles and will swear a lot. I finally got round to drilling some holes for M6 bolts to be able to fix the 3 parts together securely into a useful length tool. I drilled 6mm holes at the centre of the radiused ends of the spanners, and 30mm from the ends of the oval tube. You can fit them together in compact form for packing in the tool bag. Always handy to have a spare M6 nut and bolt anyway. Cheap and cheerful.
  27. 15 points
    OK. Latest acquisition. A Yamaha Tracer 700. Been hanging my nose over this bike for a month now. A combination of a good price offered for the NCS (which we bought at exactly the right price) and this three month old ex demo Tracer with just 1500 miles on it for £1500 less than new meant it was a deal too good to miss and has made up for recent finincial losses quite a bit. What's it like? It's incredible to be honest. Lively cross plane motor with torque everywhere and very, very light (twenty whole bags of sugar lighter than the NC). After recent bikes it's like riding a souped up 125 - except for the power obviously. Little bit taller than the NCS but no issue at all due to the (lack of) weight. Very good pillion provision including decently low passenger footpegs. Good (one finger) brakes. And the suspension is surprisingly good. Decent screen for 5'4" me and quite good weather protection. Here she is then.
  28. 15 points
    Colleagues! Yesterday I traded my NC against a different bike. I felt I should say it was "with regret", but of course it wasn't as otherwise I wouldn't have done it. You may recall from previous threads that I'd been very impressed by the BMW F800GT and wanted to try out a VFR800F, but it turned out to be a real problem. No dealer has any demonstrators - all that Honda is interested in providing demonstrators for are the whole of the new CB range and the Africa Twins (plus one other model I can't remember). Apparently the VFR is such a well established model that everybody already knows whether they want one or not. There are a good number around second-hand, but dealers basically don't want people just taking them for a joyride to see whether they like it or not, because it's just putting miles on the clock and each time it comes back it needs another valet. I see their point. I had the same experience at Pidcock Triumph in Nottingham yesterday morning (the VFR was a trade-in, presumably) - they basically won't let you ride it until you are ready to shake hands on the deal. Anyway, I did get a good look at it and sat on it (don't worry, I didn't make engine noises). In the end I decided against the VFR this time (but not forever) for the simple reason that the BMW seems to fit my body better. The handlebars weren't quite right for me on the Honda, although of course there are aftermarket risers and stuff for both bikes (all bikes), so none of this stuff is a show-stopper. I was also hoping for a ride on the Crossrunner, but again there isn't a demonstrator available locally, although my local Honda dealer (Vertu Nottingham) was willing to ship a second hand one over from another branch. In the end I decided not to pursue that route because of time pressure, although that only means not this time - see my thoughts on that next. Yesterday I realised something, which I should have realised at the beginning: none of this is that important, because whatever I buy I can swap it again next year. Meanwhile I'm certain to enjoy it, whether it's an MZ125 or an FJ1300. Also, and importantly, I'm aware that I'm pushing things a bit for the "sweet spot" to move on my existing bikes, with biking being such a seasonal pastime these days (they've depreciated £25 each since last week). So, I bought the F800GT from Pidcock BMW in Nottingham. It's a 2017 model, 5000 miles on the clock, fully loaded (comfort pack, dynamic pack, pannier boxes), two-year BMW warranty (identical to a new bike), and a Givi screen. The cost to me was my two bikes (NC and Versys) plus £2.2k, which is £200 above my budget, but sod it. I already know I'll like it, and if I find something else I like more (like a Crossrunner, Africa Twin or VRF800F?), I'll swap it again next year. The "clean" trade-in price for the NC is terrible: I think mine cost me about £7,800 new in 2016, with all the extras, and the dealers all offered me the same money for it: £3,900. When it comes to value you can ignore the accessories, so let's say it has depreciated from £7,100 to £3,900 in less than two years. Yes, I realise I could probably get a bit more if I sold it privately, but that still feels like a shocking rate of depreciation. The ten-year-old Versys did surprisingly well - £1,900. I would have thought nearer £1,200, but there you go. I very much intend to stick around (if you'll have me), having made some great online friendships and I find this place to be an oasis of reasonableness, good manners, tolerance, modesty and good humour (although it does go downhill a bit when I'm online). Oh, and expertise, too; we have access to people who actually know what they're talking about - what a rare delight on t'internet!
  29. 15 points
    Test ride ridden. Deal done. Two very happy people here 📯 Here she is - Ethel Done all the appropriate research as much as we could. Just two bikes on the shortlist in the end. Triumph T120 and the Honda. Test ride on the T120 this morning and I should really post my review on here when I get a chance as it might help others. Excellent bike the T120 but it was an easy decision in the end. Financially too, Honda were well ahead with their part exchange. So it's lovely to say, Kels and I are now back in the Honda fold
  30. 15 points
    this minter is living in the house, the wife is well chuffed.
  31. 15 points
    I actually think this forum is quite unique as it appears to have attracted 'normal' ordinary folk who are not hung up on their own egos or out to impress us as to how tough they are. Certain forums seem to revolve around macho boasting and what I call 'internet' hero's. We just don't see it here and it is highly refreshing. The addictive pleasure of choosing, buying and then playing with our bikes (should I say Toys) is what seems to suffice and the completely non 'facebook' style positive social interaction through the forum and when we meet is just another plus.
  32. 15 points
    Well past month the ride of my NC750x has been a little rougher / hard, and I had noticed the chain had gone from 1 to 3 tight spots in about a week - chain has done 18,500 miles however. Using my bike every day and ~28-30k a year I order spares in advance so when I saw the first tight link I ordered another DID VX2 520 (112) Endless chain (Gold of course....) and put it with my dwindling pile of new tyres (down to my last rear spare PR4 now). Planned to change the chain probably next weekend but given the miles I do I like to eak out as much as I can.... to a limit. Coming home Monday night however the ride was rougher and by the time I got within 1 mile of my house I could hear a noise (sort of a click noise you get as you bend metal and it springs). Got home and noticed the chain was loose... odd as only had service week before and was fine then, tightened it to spec, span the wheel and still had the click noise. Took the front sprocket cover off to see if it was coming from a tight link going around the smaller front sprocket.... only to notice that as i rotated the rear wheel, even on the center stand the chain was going from very loose to rock hard tight.... So im the space of a week the chain went from a tight link or two, to begin totally shot. The rough ride therefore coming from the chain limiting the sock movement on the swing arm arc as the chain tightens So with the train strikes on Tue, no other option at 11.30pm at night but to bite the bullet and change the chain. Begin an Endless chain that meant, exhaust can off, wheel off, bottom suspension link off, bottom bolt from shock out, both side foot peg hanger plates off, swingarm bolt out to be able to move the swingarm out of position to get the chain in. Replaced both the front and rear sprocket as I has a spare pair, but did notice almost zero wear in 18.5k miles..... Put it all back together, and had the laser out at 1am as the final step to get the wheel and chain straight. Start to finish 1.5hrs,l but would not recommend starting a job like this at 11:30pm after a long day at work ;-)
  33. 14 points
    That was one of the reasons I advised to make your claim directly against the TP insurer. If 4D are messing your witness about I am happy to meet with him to obtain a Court compliant statement of truth. Just PM me the contact details and I will do it before they upset him and he decides to go away. Once you have that signed statement you will find the TP insurer will look to pay out. There is no ‘property’ or ownership of an independent witness so no issue with me getting a statement from him for you. Your policy will still be running and you can put a new bike on it. Provided you have not claimed against it for the total loss. 4D will want to slow this down as much as possible to extend your credit hire bike use as long as possible. The process should be to put you where you were before the incident and to compensate you for your bodily injury. It’s not about making out of it or screwing the insurers. That is a crazy idea that ends up with us paying the inflated bike premiums that we have to. 4D and the like are just out to slow it all down to make profit. I am not saying you want to profit from it but some of the knee jerk comments of other contributors are ridiculous. Let’s get you back on ,the road on a bike of your choosing and your injuries treated properly. 4D should have already referred you to a solicitor for your injuries and you should start chasing them to refer you to physio ASAP. I am happy to help out. You have my number.
  34. 14 points
    I picked up my first RC truck Thursday evening, once home I found it impossible to hand over to the missus for wrapping, so I had to pull rank as a 49 year old kid and say bugger to Xmas, I'm having it now. 👍 As Ive waited months and months, the missus doesn't mind. Result. Ive had a go around the local park and I love it, even as it is out of the box. Ive just lined the inner shell with duct tape where the tyres rub and around the post holes, and added a few of the decals included. Ive also cleaned yesterday's crap off and give all the relevant parts a mist of silicone spray. I know I should've done this before using it but I just had to try it out. It's electric but has On Board Audio, speakers and a control box wired into the speed controller giving a raw recording of a 900 HP short course truck engine and I have to say it sounds bloody awesome. Anyway, here it is, my new Slash 2WD OBA And I managed to get it in the colour scheme that I wanted 😃 And now im off round a local gravel car park for some more fun. 
  35. 14 points
    I've jus ordered one of these in an attempt to get my lazy self cycling in and out to work: I need a large frame so delivery won't be until the end of Januay but the bike dealer is taking my Giant Revolt 2 in px and is giving me a bit of discount and changing the tyres for puncture resistant ones. The Cycle to Work scheme lets me spread a fair chunk of it over 12 months almost tax free which, with the px, means I only need to find a few hundred pounds to fund it. Hopefully it will help me make the 26 - 28 mile ride in under an hour and half and allow me to build up stamina and lose weight. .... well that's the idea at least I wanted the super cool looking MTB version but a test ride confirmed suspension too soft and, more importantly, the gearing was just too low for what I'm actually aiming to use it for which is 100% road commuting. Despite looking like my old geography teachers bike, the Explore does come with full mudguards (hands off Andy), lights that are powered by the drive battery and have built in cotrols on the handlebar, a sturdyrack and even a side stand, most of which I would have to add on top of the price of the MTB. Doesn't look as cool though
  36. 14 points
    *not a bike post alert* The temptation to post several selfies with a Leaf I’d collected after it’s fallen from trees near the office was quite high but you’ll be pleased to know I’ve not done so. Just making sure the inevitable puns are all covered off. My old man’s unfortunately been shipped off to Indonesia for some high stakes drama between the Navy and the Foreign office or something leaving my mam alone with the dogs for a while. They’ve not really been separated for any lengthy period of time since he came off the Campbeltown nearly 25 years ago so I spent some time with her over the weekend. Off for shopping trips and a lunch, she offered me the keys to her pride and joy, a 66-plate Nissan Leaf Acenta. I love all things wheeled and the gub’mint is determined that cars like the Leaf will, one day, be our inevitable future. I couldn’t turn it down could I? Stupidly I failed to take any actual pictures of it however a quick google for a Gun Metal Grey Leaf will give you an idea. Beyond the fact it has Zero Emissions plastered along the door sides and on the boot, it looks relatively...well. Normal. Yes, it has an unconventional bulbous shape rather than the very chiselled, angular thing most C segment cars go for nowadays but otherwise little betrays it’s special powertrain on the outside. It feels roughly the same size as most of the cars in it’s cars, perhaps a teeny bit longer than some, but no biggy. The inside, from looks alone, isn’t that unconventional either. Actually it all feels slightly retro. Big digital dashboards, two of them, and a centre console raised from the flush surface and covered in piano black plastic. The Fit and Finish is excellent, as you would expect from a Japanese manufacturer. There is an abundance of slightly hard scratchy plastics in places but it all feels solid. The seats are covered in this strange, artificial velour type material and you sink into them like armchairs. I once had the pleasure/displeasure of being carted around in an old Citroen CX, the leviathan cheese wedge shaped barges from the 80s, and the seats feel remarkably similar. Luxuriously comfy, very much likely. The battery pack fits somewhere along the floor space under the rear seat which inevitably leaves rear legroom compromised. I’m only 5ft 5 and I found my 29” legs folded up very high, uncomfortably so for any lengthy journey. Shoulder space is excellent; you could happily fit 3 Tolkein dwarves in there with no issues at all. For anyone in the heady 6ft regions you’re going to struggle, maiming might be your only option. Strangely the battery doesn’t compromise the boot which feels pretty sizable. Beyond having a bag to fit your charging wire in, it’s a nice deep square shape. Humongous loading lip so dogs might struggle but perhaps you could put them in the backseat while your >6ft passenger goes in the boot? Legalities aside it’s probably more comfortable for everyone involved. It’s only when you turn it on that immediately things get different. It’s keyless entry as standard which is lovely, foot on the break and push the starter button. Nothing. Well, that’s a lie. No engine noise, the car comes to life in abject mechanical silence. What it does do is produce a little jingle of some form sort of like house phones from the 90s. Rather starship like displays all kick into life with the upper dashboard having a digital speedo, eco meter, clock and external temp gauge. The lower display has your battery meter, battery temperature gauge, cruise control/limiter, mileage and diagnostic screen. Fully charged with 6,000 on the clock, this particular example read 87miles till she’s running empty. This is a MY2016 with the larger 30kWh battery. It’s important to note that this figure is built of a great many bits of information and is not necessarily accurate from the moment you pull away. The car knew that the electric fan heater is on which mullers the battery life, the car was not in “eco” mode which dampens the throttle response and so it predicts it will use more battery in normal driving. It constantly assesses your driving and electrical usage to give an accurate prediction of range and there is a great many things you can do to extend the range. For example, disabling the heater and switching on Eco mode put that almost immediately up to over 100 miles of range. The eco indicator is rather sweet as you build a little infographic “tree” as you continue to drive ecologically; it makes careful driving become a game of sorts. Actually driving it is curiously liberating. Flicking the little selector into “D” and pulling away in absolute silence is a strangely eerie feeling but you quickly get used to it. This is one seriously refined and relaxing thing to be in. It glides over almost any imperfection in the road and wind noise is almost non-existent. The only real noise is from the tyres but even then that’s a distant rumble rather than anything intrusive. In eco mode the throttle response is kinda like driving a hybrid; there’s a noticeable hesitancy under the pedal but with a decent shove it moves along pretty smartly. The advantage of electric is 100% torque at standstill so even in the supposedly eco friendly mode it happily romps away from traffic with a liberal application of your right foot. Take it out of eco mood and despite the fancy electric transmission there is enough torque to get the front’s spinning. The throttle response immediately feels more urgent, so much so it’s almost a little challenging to control when you’re stuck behind Dorris in a 20 year old Micra. It’s enormously satisfying to outdrag a 330d or some other executive car off the line as it’s bogged down by it’s transmission. Course it’ll catch up eventually but no one seems to expect a dowdy hatchback to be a silent rocket. Something to note is the savage engine breaking. It’s actually a KERS like system that recovers thermal energy under braking or throttle less rolling which it then shoves back in the battery. It’s a clever system by rather aggressive, especially when going up hill. I wonder whether the brake lights should show... Despite the range being pretty short on these things it’s remarkably capable on the motorway. Supposedly it’s only capable of 90 odd mph but there’s some left over for overtaking at 70. Certainly it feels just as quick and flexible as say a small eco-diesel until you’re above 80. At those sorts of speeds you’re going to be sapping battery at a frankly ridiculous rate so 70mph is the comfortable cruising speed. We travelled from Gosport to Southampton on the motorway and it didn’t feel out of its depth at all. It handles reasonably well too. Certainly the tires Nissan fit to it are more than a match for the components underneath them. I did have a slightly hairbrained moment hooning it onto a slip road into the outside lane where it simply understeered onto the rumble strips but that was more my own loutishness than anything. It does roll quite a lot in reasonably speedy corners but it never feels uncontrolled. Just floppy. Like a St Bernard with wheels. Around town and in car parking centres etc the power steering feels very very fluid, very light and easy to use. Parking it is a dream especially as the mid range models up have parking sensors and a reversing camera. I mirror park any car I’m not familiar with and that was easy enough. However, this does neatly segue into the key downside of Electric Car ownership; Charging it. The Leaf’s charging point, much like most of the lower end of the EV market, is mounted under the badge on the bonnet meaning you have to frontwards park if you intend to charge it with a pod while you’re oot and aboot. To my shame it’s the only element of driving in which I am utterly hopeless at. Parallel or Reverse parking, no problem. Frontwards? Rubbish. Took me about 3 attempts to get it vaguely straight confounded by the auto transmission which has quite a quick rolling function. The car has two charging connections on it; one is the Type 2 standard which appears to be pretty much ubiquitous and deals with slower and mid speed charging while the other is a CHAdeMO port for fast charging. The car comes, as standard, only with the slower speed charging lead. I think a lot of the fast charging pods have cables built in for supporting the speedy charging. Actually working out how to use the damn thing might as well require an engineering degree. Plugging it into the car is easy and it locks in place to stop someone nicking your cable which is great. The pods, however, are universally completely incomprehensible. The first we tried with Podpoint requires a little contactless card thing which was supplied with the home charger that came with the car. Could we get it to work? Could ever. No indication its actually doing anything at all until the car itself starts flashing on the dashboard to say it’s charging. Working out how to unlock the port on the pod was a nightmare and, once we got back, it took us nearly half an hour in the pouring rain to work out how to release the cable. Podpoint were then adamant that we’d paid for the charging despite it showing as a nil charge which was patently not true. After all that it’d only actually gained about 10 miles of range for the hour and a half we were there. Some shopping centres now come with entirely free charging points which West Quay does. That was much easier than the Podpoints at Whiteley. But it’s still a complete faff; with an ICE car the format and methodology behind putting the blow-up juice in is universal. I counted 3 different charging point providers when we were out and about and all of them accepted payment for the charging in different ways, none of them cross compatible. For something like a Tesla or a Renault Zoe that has theoretic ranges in excess of 200 miles on a charge its less of an issue but with the MY2016 Leaf it becomes rather prohibitive. It’s worth noting that repeated rapid charging can make the battery rather hot which will inevitably ruin the battery’s life. The pay back is cost. This car covers approximately 250 miles a month which costs around £15 in electricity or so. The car before it, a 2015 Corsa, would be spending nearly £45 in petrol to do that journey. Road tax is free, congestion charges (if applicable) don’t apply to EVs, the Itchen Bridge is free. I believe there is a consultation to even open bus lanes to EVs. While parking it and charging it is a pain, special parking reserved only for EVs is actually quite common now and usually really close to shopping centres. If you can stomach the initial outlay or, as mam did, buy a demonstrator as the residual values are appalling then as a second car it makes absolute sense. There’s a wider issue that has me hesitating as well. How ecologically friendly are they? The materials required to manufacture the batteries which have an effective life of 10 years at best are particularly unfriendly to the environment to mine and manufacture. There is an argument that EVs and Hybrids have covered so many CO2 “miles” before they even reach their recipient that the actual CO2 impact of one compared to a Ford Focus or similar is virtually the same. It also depends on the national grid which varies in its ecological friendliness from country to country. For me, any car that’ll be virtually worthless and likely at the end of its effective life after 10 years just isn’t worth it. It’s proof if there ever was proof needed that we have a long way to go before we’re ready for that. EVs have their place but until they become convenient, long range, long life prospects then they’re nothing more than a second car novelty. I think I’d rather have a thumping motorbike between my legs.
  37. 14 points
    Honda couldn’t supply a red Crossrunner until next month but a few calls to other dealers by Kent M/Cs means I pick mine up next Saturday the 15th. Top box lights and Sat nav being transferred over. Shad seat sold to a member of this forum. Trade in bras in excess of retail price shown in Glass’s guide. My thoughts on the 2 bikes as follows. Please remember whilst some are obviously facts others are my personal views Crossrunners negatives compared with NC 1) Price 2)Servicing costs 3) Fuel consumption 4)weight 5) Less desirable colour options. Crossrunner positives compared with NC 1) Acceleration 2) Comfort seat is as good as a NC with Shad seat. 3)Heated grips as standard 4) Accesory lead as standard. 5) Self cancelling indicators 6) Front indicators act as running lights. 7) For me it has the FUN factor that I didn’t find in the NC. 8) I feel that I shall be able to get more involvement with it. Im sure others may well disagree with me
  38. 14 points
    Had test ride today and ended up bringing the demo home. A deal involving trading the NCl for a new one has been agreed in principle subject to me being able to push the bike backwards down our drive and out onto the road with too much difficulty
  39. 14 points
    Emphatically not; it's the surest way of irritating car drivers and getting an aggressive response. Motorcyclists get a bad enough rap as it is. I filter for a few miles every day on my way to work, and I aim to be as discreet and unnoticeable as possible. Of course, it requires a high degree of vigilance to spot the subtle early signs of an impulsive lane-swap, but it works for me. And if a car hasn't noticed me and the gap is too narrow, well, I just wait.
  40. 14 points
    Collected the bike from Bob Minions on Derby, excellent people to deal with by the way, and rode it home, sadly motorway all the way. First thoughts. Comfort: The seat is a bit hard, hopefully it will break in over time. Comfortwise somewhere between the original NC seat and the DFS sofa that is my Kawasaki GT 750. Ok for 120 miles, feels initially like it will be really uncomfortable but actually not too bad. It's not a gold wing. Excellent riding position though with ace visibility as your sat up so high. Glad I have 34" inside leg though. Performance: happily buzzes along at 70 on the motorway. I was running into a headwind all the way, 70 is 7000 rpm, it nips up to Audi/BMW outside lane speed to sprint past stuff, but happy at 70. Engine buzzes a little at that speed but not uncomfortable. Really impressive for a 24hp 250 however. Going up Haldon hill on the A38 south of Exeter, it happily accelerated from 50 at the bottom (traffic) to 70 in 6th and was capable of adding 5 mph to that off the throttle. That's a big, steep, fast hill. I was impressed by that. Even more impressive was the fuel consumption, running into a headwind for 250 miles mostly near the top 90% of is speed capabilities, over 82mpg! Handling: it's different, 21" front wheel, knobbly tyres and long travel suspension, it's an off-road biased bike after all. It nevertheless feels secure on the road and you soon get used to the different feeling. Overall: Impressive for a 24hp 250, enough performance for the road, the engine is a bit more buzzing, it's a single and your reving it harder, but it's not intrusive. It's comfortable enough, the screen works well, the ABS works well, it's very economical and it's so nice to ride a light bike again. It's not going to pull your arms off and needs a bit of room for overtakes. Oh and it barely notices speed bumps and the roads feel much smoother now. Definitely bought a good one, See you on the weekend in the Peak District in two weeks time
  41. 14 points
  42. 14 points
    I said I would post a few pics of the trip for anyone interested so here we are: Crossed over the Seine on the Tancarville bridge just for old times sake as that was the route on my first ever bike trip to France. Pleased to say it was free for bikes as was the new and much bigger Pont de Normandie on the return trip. The hotel in Dinard, only 2 star, but an excellent room and nice mixture of modern and restored older decor. It is run by a nice young couple who spoke English and were very helpful. The parking bays on the road are nearly always full, but they told me I could park on the pavement just outside the hotel, where I could see the bike from my window. A few pics of a day trip over the bay to St Malo, when it was so hot that I went for a swim in the sea, resorting to pretending my underpants were swimming trunks, which meant I had to go commando for the rest of the day! Moved on from Dinard to Perros Guirac and then circled back to Dinard via Morlaix to drop Anne off at Dinard Airport, staying at a couple of good hotels along the way, particularly the last one called Chateau De Beaussais which has an excellent restaurant and accommodation in little stone cottages in the grounds. Would have stayed there longer if we could. Morlaix Lunch stop
  43. 14 points
    Years ago whilst nearing home in the rain we spotted two riders standing by a roundabout in torrential rain. We then saw that there was a HD sportster laying on the floor. It turned out that the lady rider of it had come off on spilt diesel. We helped pick them up as we were about 3 minutes from home took them with us. They were a very nice German couple so we let the lady have a bath to help ease the pain and then fed them and gave them a bed for the night. As I said that was many years ago and we have never met since but every year we receive a card from them which shows they haven't forgotten.
  44. 14 points
    My C70 just finished it and wait on the V5 30 years in a shed, i dragged it out after i sold all my running bikes in January ..I have a Lifan 110 to go in it after the MOT.
  45. 13 points
    My new baby !( Bloody big baby ) is here , triumph rocket111 , to add to my ever growing list of bikes , lucky I've got trade insurance which covers multiple vehicles , got to give a bit of a service and check over before she is let loose , cant wait
  46. 13 points
    After a number of delivery extensions from ordering, I take delivery of my baby BMW next week. F850GS Sport. The last few weeks have been productive. I sold both my VFR1200F DCT and my Tiger 800. Both for full asking price. Even the weather next week looks to be playing ball. I might book it's first service for next week when I collect it. I tried a lot of similar machines before putting my deposit down. I still wish shaft drive had been an option on the bike.
  47. 13 points
    There you go, market for a new product. Some sort of dispenser built in with Grecian 2000/boot polish/ dodgy hormones off the interweb. The lid goes on Kojak and comes off Bobby Moore. I do not have this trouble #1 all over. Story on this though, I used to have SB&S, #3 on top but got fed up of the barbers taking a whole afternoon with appointments running late and trying to sell stuff I didn't want. I bought the clippers and did #2. The wife wasn't impressed. Then I slipped and took a lump out so the only solution was #1 all over. She's now really not happy and says I look like a convict. It'll grow back says I. Only 3 years later it hadn't, (mostly due to a weekly top off). One night over dinner she says " Isn't it funny how your hair used to grow like mad and now it doesn't". I did actually manage to mumble some sort agreement to this and not launch soup through my nostrils. Andy
  48. 13 points
    Just as a follow up to my last thread on farkling the GS - I've now modified a set of Shad pannier mounts and frames to make use of the space liberated by fitting a low level exhaust. I've had to buy a set of the SH36 panniers for fitting purposes as the new design SH35 panniers with aluminium outer panels have been delayed - so will have a set of SH36s to sell at some point if anyone is interested. These were ex-demo items and came with a set of mounting frames for the Yamaha MT-09, and very fortuitously these frames were much easier to modify for the new positioning on the GS than the ones that came in the GS fitting kit, so I only used the top brackets from that. With the original Shad GS fittings and the high level exhaust the panniers come out as 115 cm wide compared with the next widest part which is the hand guards on the bars which are 98 cm. With the mods I have made the overall width is now 101 cm, so only about 15 mm wider than the bars on each side. The new SH35 panniers look significantly flatter and slimmer in shape than the SH36, though they are supposed to have the same 36 litre capacity, so with a bit of luck once these are fitted the width will probably be no more than the 98 cms of the bars. I've made up some additional bits to attach the frames to the top brackets, and also to fit a pair of tool tubes, so the whole lot will be going off to be stripped and powder coated next week. In the meantime here are a few pics. With unmodified mounts (and my temporary £20 top box!) - 115 cm wide: Does my bum look big in these? (Perspective effect makes this look a lot wider than bars but they aren't.)
  49. 13 points
    Hi All, This is my first "long" post on here so apologies in advance if this is boring for some, but thought I'd share my personal experience for what it's worth as there's a lot of different info about brake pads out there. I've done around 5.5k miles on my NC750X and recently noticed that my rear brakes had about 1.5mm left on them. Not many miles I know but these were 5.5k miles of stop-start peak-hour London Circular traffic, so I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt. As I was researching on how to repace the pads, never had I seen so many conflicting strong opinions on which ones to get - OE/non-OE, sintered vs organic, every brand under the sun, copper grease, don't copper grease, some types will warp your discs while others have the "brake feel" of warm cheese. So after *much* deliberation, I eventually pulled the trigger on a set of EBC Double-H Sintered Brakes (FA496HH rear - and I bought a front set FA196HH as well). I settled on EBC as they seemed like a good "solid" brand - not too flashy like Brembo, etc (not interested in track days and shaving my discs) or not some unknown Chinese brand with unknown quality. Their pads are made in the USA (their Organic ones are from the UK), and from the review of the latest sintered ones didn't look like they will damage my discs too badly nowadays. Though again, I've had so many conflicting reports from other (non-Honda) forums so I'm never 100%. I didn't go for the OE pads because a) I can't seem to find a reputable source for them and they were about double the price and c) I've read bad reviews about them for wearing out quickly (which may be consistent with my case). I think I've left enough of the old pads so I can always swap them back come service/warranty time. I had originally ordered the kevlar/organic versions, but when I discovered that the OE pads are in fact sintered, I exchanged them. Full props to MSA Direct who offered really good and quick service for the exchange and were the best price for the 2 sets. Tools I needed were: Torque wrench - I've always been "yeah - tight enough", but I've always wanted a torque wrench to "do it proper". I ended up getting the Halfords Professional 8-60nm one. It's one of the very few purchases from Halfrauds I didn't feel like having a shower afterwards. It's made in England, really accurate (comes with a certificate) and had some really good reviews. Most importantly, it covers the torque range of most items relating to servicing the NC, without having to buy two wrenches - which is actually quite rare. 12mm and 8mm sockets Blue (medium strength) Loctite - to recoat the "ALOC" (loctite already applied) caliper mounting bolts which you are, according to Honda , supposed to buy a new one each time you change the pads. Some silicone grease Lots of brake cleaner and an old toothbrush Gloves, lots of old newspaper, wipes, covers, whatever your missus' acceptance level is - (it's a pretty dirty job) ... The task of changing the pads was really straightforward. It was a matter of: Unscrewing the the pad holding pin, Unscrewing the rear caliper mounting bolt Pushing the calipers up and removing the pads Giving everything a really good clean with an old toothbrush and lots of cleaner. Install the new pads in its place Push the calipers back down over the pads (you may need to push in the piston - make sure it's well clean first) Putting some silicone grease on the end of the pad holding pin and screwing it back in to the right torque setting Applying loctite on the caliper mounting bolt and screw it back into the right torque setting. Done. The longest part was getting in there and cleaning it all up. I've also noticed that there was no copper grease applied anywhere, so I didn't apply any to the new pads either to be consistent. Again, a lot of conflicting opinions, but it seems that more recent bikes don't seem to need greasing on pads, so I didn't use it this time. Though I didn't need to replace the front pads, I also took the opportunity to take apart the front pads, clean it out well, inspect it closely and put it all back. Again, similar to above and pretty simple. Finally, I needed to take the bike out somewhere for bit of a test run. "Honey...I need to go for a ride to the bike shop to...um...break-in the new pads that we saved money on by doing myself..." I had expected to get nothing from the rear brakes - but to my surprise they're bedding in nicely already. On a related note, I've noticed on the forum there's some confusion as to what the OE pads are. I had assumed they were organic (and hence why I originally ordered organic pads) as the NC's are built to a price and is certainly not a supersport bike. But I was wrong. On inspecting the front pads, they were definitely sintered - very metallic surface and the backs of them had the model number and a "HH" designation after it. The rear ones are at least semi-sintered- not quite as shiny as the fronts, but definitely had a metallic feel. I attach pictures here for those who may be interested. Anyway, hope this helps other people here. I found it so difficult to decide how best to do it as there's so much conflicting information and opinions out there about brake pads! Ride safe.
  50. 13 points
    Recorder unit I wanted to mount the camera on the back of the maintenance lid, where the small toolkit is stored. Firstly, I moved the toolkit to the little compartment at the bottom where the manual would normally be kept, which was surprisingly roomy. With the toolkit out of the way, I then took the maintenance lid out and drilled a couple of adjacent holes on the left of the indent to allow the cables through. Followed by the recorder mounting clip secured with the included double-sided pad. DVR unit mounted on the clip which was mounted to the maintenance lid with the included double-sided pad. Holes drilled on the side to allow the cables to be fed through. And here is the recorder in place inside the helmet compartment and wired up. Control Button Finally, I mounted the control button in front of the lid. The button is rather handy so that I can press it to protect a particular recording from being overwritten and long-press to manually stop or start recording. Finally, I didn’t end up mounting the GPS module. Primarily because I didn’t want any more clutter on the bike, but also, I’m not convinced recording the speed I’m doing will really be of any additional benefit (not that I’m breaking the law!) Completed Pictures It was time to put it all back together again and test it out. Here are some pictures of the camera in place (excuse the dirty bike!): Testing it out The camera comes with a removable battery (I believe the same type as used in GoPros) which should record for about 30 minutes. However, it’s really is designed to be wired to the 12v ignition supply. Thankfully, it can be set so that when you turn on your bike, it automatically turns on and starts recording when you start the bike and shuts down at the end of the journey The K1 comes with a whole of options on its on-screen menu, such as video size and quality, flipped video (if you mount the camera up-side down like I did), motion detection. Innovv seemed to have done their research with regards to their dashcam features, such as: G-sensor file protection - It will automatically protect a file when the built-in G-sensor reaches a certain threshold (ie a crash). The sensitivity can be adjustable. Motion Detection - Pretty standard for dashcams, but useful if you want to save space on your SD Card “Parking Mode” - When enabled, when you switch off the ignition, the recorder stays on and goes into “motion detect” mode, and records when it detects any motion, until its internal battery runs out. You could wire up external power separately to extend this time It also had a fancy Lane Departure warning system, which I suspect this is for car use only. This is weird... When I turned on the ignition for the first time, the screen started to flicker and the unit reset itself. Then it would work again, until I’d rev the engine, when it would flicker and reset itself again. Assuming it was the power supply/voltage issue, I unplugged the power cables completely so it ran only on battery and the only two leads going into the unit were the cameras. But no luck - again with screen flickering and resetting. I tried to move the camera cables around inside the bike, especially trying to avoid any other wiring, especially anything to do with the ignition. It was only after several tries and placing the cables around the airbox (as far away from any other wiring), that I got it to behave normally. I’ve let Innovv know about the issue and they said that they will keep an eye out for the problem. However, it’s been running reliably fine ever since. Videos I was surprised how good the quality was of the video, especially of the front camera - the perspex windscreen with all its fine scratches and road dirt barely interfered with the camera. I set the front to record at 1080p but the rear at 720p to save space on the card. The clips are stored as 2 minute segments (which can be changed to 5 or 10 minutes) and have a couple of seconds overlap between each clip, so it’s not missing out any footage. Typical day commute through sunny Croydon Front view: Rear view: Note: Youtube quality is a bit rubbish compared to the source files. Also the slight shake on the front camera at an angle was due to the loose mounting which I’ve since fixed. Video quality is surprisingly good for a dashcam, and can details are pretty clear, especially licence plates. When you insert a new card in and format it, it automatically includes a player which can be run directly off the card (on a PC), so you don’t have to faff about with players, etc. It also displays the running G-force at any point, and GPS location and speed (if you have GPS installed and enabled). Conclusion/TL;DR The Innovv K1 is a great compact front and rear camera, designed for a motorcycle and really fit the bill for my requirements for a discreet and tidy solution. The unit and the cameras feel solid and well built, unlike many of the cheap generic dash/action cams you get from *that* auction site. And I’ve had a few. Once you get over the challenge of installing it on the bike, it’s really quite simple to configure and get going. The simultaneous dual front and rear camera recording is really great as it offers a lot more coverage, and the video quality is surprisingly good and clear. The player that’s included in the card is rather handy. I’ve had the unit for a couple of weeks now and it now “just works”. I’m now starting to forget that it’s even there - which is exactly what I wanted.. I’ve not tested it under many conditions, as I’ve only really used it on the daily commute, but I’ll update with new videos when I get the chance or go on any long runs with various conditions.. Liked Front and rear simultaneous video provides great coverage. Good quality video Handy included player copied to the SD card (for PCs) Set and forget. It’s a unit that’s exactly what I wanted - discrete and just works without having to do anything each time I ride. Also I didn’t sacrifice any space or aesthetics to install it. Improvements More mounting accessories. Motorcycles are far more fiddly to mount cameras on than cars, so could benefit from more mounting options. Their previous C3 model came with a pile of them, and in fact I had to take the front camera mount from the C3. But you could order them as extras on the website. More mounting pads. For the same reasons above. Though it comes with a single spare set of fitted double-sided pads, another set would be useful if you need to reposition more than once (which could be likely after you’ve used it for a while). For example, I wouldn’t mind repositioning the control button to get it right. The unit can record audio, but am not sure where from. I initially thought it was the cameras, but the microphone may be in the GPS unit,which I didn’t install. Audio would be useful, but not the end of the world. Next steps: Though I’m happy with the installation, there are a couple of things I’d like to fine tune now that I’ve had the chance to test it. These have nothing to do with the dashcam itself, though: Wiring - Though there was plenty of room behind the maintenance lid for all my cabling, it’s still a bit of a dog’s breakfast by my standards. It was good enough to get it going initially, but I’d like to wire it up properly using a separate line to the sub-harness and put the accessory socket back in its rightful place. Improved water channeling - I’ve noticed on particularly wet days, the drops of water would bead over the windscreen and then come down the back of the screen and in front of the camera. I’m trying out some adhesive rubber strips to hopefully channel away from dripping down the inside Will keep you posted on any updates on how I go with the DVR...
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