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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 15/01/19 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Having spent quite a bit on suspension upgrades and other useful mods I've had to accept the NC750XA isn't right for me. I'm collecting a CBF100FA on Friday to replace the NC. I have serious multiple orthopaedic problems following a couple of life changing [non fault] accidents in the last 28 years so I can't really blame the NC as I'm quite demanding and have specific needs. Fingers crossed this is a good move! All the best to all you remaining NC owners...
  2. 11 points
    Linguini Carbonara? The machine on the right has won on the Isle of Man six times (Ryan Farquhar x 3, McGuinness x 2 and Josh Brookes x 1) and the one on the left just makes me smile. Which makes it a winner in my eyes!
  3. 11 points
    Since I retired I seem to have adopted the “Australian” attitude to work.. Spanish singer Julio Iglesias was Anne Diamond’s chat show (ITV, I think) and he used the word "manãna" (pronounced "munyana"). Anne asked him to explain what it meant. He said that the term means: "Maybe the job will be done tomorrow; maybe the next day; maybe the day after that; or perhaps next week; next month; next year. Who really cares?" Anne turned to Albert Yatapingu from the Gumbaingeri Tribe (aboriginal) who was also on the show. She asked him if there was an equivalent term in his native language. "Nah" he replied. "In Australia we don't have a word to describe that degree of urgency."
  4. 8 points
    Thanks for all the sympathy guys, first world problems I know, but still bloody annoying, and very disappointing. Anyway, I've been to see the dealer who has been very helpful given the circumstances which are not even their fault. The end result is that I am having a new R1250GS, and ended up only paying about half the normal difference in price between GS and RS, so I think that is a good deal. Getting a good discount off list price of a more expensive bike which has the new engine should stand me in good stead should I decide to swap to an RS in a year or two. Game on!
  5. 8 points
  6. 8 points
    Hello .........Hello .... is anybody there ? I’m looking for the nc owners forum ! Shush you’ll wake him up and he’ll start talking about mileage again. :0)
  7. 8 points
    It’s an interesting system Triumph have on the LC twins. The crank turns an intermediary gear which drives the cam chain, this, in turn, means that the crank rotates forwards and the cam rotates backwards.. It keeps the cam chain short which should lead to long service life. The shims (9.5 mm same as many Yamahas) live under the rockers which simply unbolt to allow shim changes without disturbing the cam. Nice one Mr Bloor I’m not rushing (my daughter is moving flats today and assisting her takes priority over motorcycles - as Mrs T was at great pains to point out!) just an hour here and there. Not a job I would want to rush anyway, but the second time will be quicker.
  8. 7 points
    Kent M/Cs delivered Sue's new bike this afternoon. I'm ;looking forward to hear her opinion on how it feels to ride when weather permitting she takes it out for the first time tomorrow. Not sure what happened with the middle picture but if you click on it it should open in the proper size
  9. 6 points
    Right, I’m (by no means) an expert on the theory. I’m a humble spanner twirling labourer but here’s how I see it. When you lift the clutch you actually disconnect the engine from the drive. The engagement dogs are free to mesh and your gearbox will last 100 years. Cool. Clutchless shifts (as practiced by a number of us) are nearly as kind. You nod the throttle off to reduce the load and ‘feel’ the gears in with your foot. Doing it right is an absolute joy and your gearbox will last 90 years. A quick shift momentarily reduces the load but the gears are slammed into place whether they like it or not. And mostly they don’t. Your gearbox will last the warranty period or six laps of the TT whichever is the shorter.. Looking at a race bike box always shows wear or bruising to the engagement dogs, damage caused by the great ‘God of speed’ that many worship at all (or any) costs.
  10. 6 points
  11. 6 points
    I totally agree. Quickshifters are a hideous bodge that impose considerable shock loads on the transmission. On a race bike it's fine - probably gets you several tenths of a second per lap. On a road bike, though? The engineering inelegance offends me.
  12. 6 points
    Delighted that Sue is chuffed! It’s had quite a power hike since the last model and, well, we might not need more power, but it’s always nice to have, eh? I agree about the quick shifter and certainly wouldn’t put one on either. Even for free. Why? Reasonable question. They add nothing that I am looking for on a road bike and actually take away something (smoothness in ‘give and take’ town traffic. As soon as you touch the lever it cuts the ignition for a nano second which is a major pain if you’re not actually on full throttle and ‘going for it’). I also see them as unnecessarily harsh on the transmission which is a price you might be prepared to pay to shave a tenth of a second off your lap times but ‘why bother’ on the road.
  13. 6 points
    When I was considering fitting one to the Crossrunner (genuine Honda accessory) I asked around for advice from people with the appropriate experience and the general concenus of opinion that for the type of riding we do there was littl or no advantage. Sue took this into consideration and as the dealer made fan allowance against the already discounted extras ( still waiting for some to become available) and decided not to bother with it. As I said her decision.
  14. 5 points
    Congratulations on passing your final engineers exam! The phalange doowop was stuck (we had to take a claw hammer to it). The cat-flap wouldn't open (we had to take a claw hammer to it). The toaster wouldn't pop (we had to take a claw hammer to it). Mother had constipation (we had to take a claw hammer to it).
  15. 5 points
    Much as I dislike the hamster wheel principle, I find your logic difficult to fault. If you want one of these high value, complex bikes, keeping up the level makes sense. One decent fault outside the warranty period and even after the cost of the fix your trade in stands out from all the others and not in a good way. If you want to see scary, find the price of a servo-braked 1150 with the warning light on. Stepping off their treadmill, selling the GS and buying a 7 year old Pan European makes financial sense, but so would a train ticket and if that doesn't give you enjoyment what's the point. Andy
  16. 5 points
    Yes, farkling up a brand new GS1250 must be such a bore..
  17. 5 points
    A pity plan A didn't work out Fred but unlike the Govt. at least you had a plan B. Although not your first choice I'm sure you'll love the new GS.
  18. 5 points
    You're not being thick! It's a perfectly reasonable question. Regardless of whether the engine is firing at the time, it is spinning at a certain speed determined by the gear ratio and the road speed of the bike The clutch is engaged, so the engine is mechanically coupled to the back wheel. When you do a quick-shift you are asking the engine to change its speed instantly, to suit the next gear. It can't of course - it must be accelerated or decelerated. Thus when the new gears engage they will be under a lot of stress as they try to do this instant acceleration/deceleration of the crankshaft. It can be ameliorated in a few ways. Cutting the power helps on upshifts (but see later); today's lightweight flywheels make it easier to achieve rapid changes in engine speed; close-ratio gearboxes require less of a change in engine speed; tiny amounts of clutch slip will take the hard edge off the acceleration/deceleration forces, as will flex in the transmission (rubber buffers in the wheel, etc). Also, moving the lever at a moderate speed will mean the gearbox stays in the "false neutral" between gears a bit longer, giving it more time to slow down for the next gear. (Obviously, too moderate and you'll get a crunch because the engine will have slowed down too much.) Note that cutting the power isn't so much about letting the engine slow down, as releasing the gear dogs. They have ramped sides, so that they "lock" into gear under torque. Try changing gear under power - it is much harder as you must force the dogs out of engagement, working against their natural tendency to pull together. Obviously quick-shifters work, so you might argue that all of my objections are irrelevant. But although they can be made to work, it is still a hideous bodge in engineering terms because it imposes shock forces on components with no good reason (on road bikes, at least). Knowing the Japanese these shock forces will be amongst the many parameters which are engineered in to the gearbox, engine and final drive, so I'm pretty confident they will work fine and do no damage. But for me, even knowing that doesn't alter my perception that it's a colossal kludge (just like telescopic forks - a very well developed bad idea). The elegant solution to fast, clutchless gearchanges is DCT.
  19. 5 points
    Believe me Iwould still like one. As I have said before I have a sports bike mind but sadly no longer a sports bike body.😀 I still can’t walk past some sports bikes without drooling. That’s due to desire not old age by the way.😂
  20. 5 points
    Not quite in the same league but I'm testing a CB300R tomorrow with the same Neo Cafe styling, to be a second bike. 143kg wet, 31bhp, claimed 185 mile range from 10ltr tank.
  21. 5 points
    If you remember that was basically the advice you gave me when I asked you about fitting one to my Crossrunner. Your opinion was one of those that Sue considered.
  22. 5 points
    Sue has just returned from her first ride on the new bike and is ecstatic with it. Her only niggle is the bars that she said she might have to change later on unless she can adjust to them. Regarding performance apparently it is far more exciting than the CB650F and more reminiscent of her Hornet. She rates it somewhere between her standard Hornet and her tuned and modified Hornet. According to Sue the handling is good once the tyres warm up and it’s very stable in the corners. Suspension is firm but comfortable. I think that she may well keep this one for a while. Now where did I put that Honda catalogue.😀😀. In all honestly I can’t think of a bike that I would want to change the Crossrunner for that I can actually ride.
  23. 4 points
    It's classed as a motorcycle due to the distance between the front wheels. This is the day I rode it.
  24. 4 points
    I got a weather cover ages ago from a manufacturer in Shipley Yorkshire. I bought it in August and paid £79 for it from https://www.specialisedcovers.com/ it took about 5 weeks from order to being delivered, they kept me informed of the progress. I have finally put it over the bike tonight, didn't fit it due to all the high winds lately, but after seeing it on the bike, I shouldn't have been worried about it, quality and fit are superb. The only thing I will say is the price has gone up a lot since August, they are now £149 but still good value at that price.
  25. 4 points
    Ducati has just the thing, a Panigalle V4. This is a street bike, available to anyone with a full license and a finance deposit. The mind boggles.. The exhaust ‘soundtrack’ reminds me of Joey on a V4 Honda!
  26. 4 points
    The reason I pay to have them done is that me and mechanical things don’t mix and I would rather have someone else do it than put my own life at risk.
  27. 4 points
    As I have commented before, Motorcycles and the pursuit of the perfect bike is more addictive than any class A drug or even Fortnite 😄😄😄
  28. 4 points
    I definitely Would not use petrol, modern fuels are nasty stuff and the vapour is very volatile, unless you like the significant risk of going up in a ball of flame 🔥 Even outside....... Any decent proprietary de-greaser will be fine, but may not be necessary. Wipe the sump out with a cloth and if there's nothing there it should be ok. As Embee said, get the old clutch cover off before you replace the sump plate and chase/flush anything through if necessary.
  29. 4 points
    Having had one of its predecessors for a while (while I could still bend that much to fit it😁) they are wonderfully pointless, but incredible pieces of technology. I certainly wouldn't begrudge someone having one so long as they "play nice". Even you Rock have had the odd sports bike in your time, and which of us have always stuck to the rules all the time😎😇. I couldn't ride one now, but I am heartily gladdened they exist and am equally glad some lucky souls will get to enjoy them. If only I was 30 years younger and more bendy😉....... And could creep a £30k bill past the good lady........😱
  30. 4 points
    Brilliance and irrelevance in a single package. Geoff.
  31. 4 points
    I like the way the speedo goes blank above 185 mph! “Yeah, had the speedo blank out twice tonight on my way to the Cafe..”
  32. 4 points
    I've not had that experience with the BMW quickshifters. I believe it uses a pressure sensor to detect an imminent gear change and seems calibrated to require enough pressure that it knows you are definitely going for a shift, plus it monitors the clutch lever and does not activate if it detects any pressure there. My objection is not that it doesn't work well - it does, so long as you only use it for downshifts on a closed throttle, and keep the throttle pinned or at least well open on upshifts. My objection is that the gearbox must change between ratios by disengaging one pair of gears and engaging another pair while still connected to the engine. Regardless of reducing torque by brief millisecond cuts to the ignition, the engine is still connected, which means that the rear wheel, transmission and gearbox effectively has to speed up or slow down the engine, and to do so is subjected to the extra load caused by the inertia of the rotating/moving masses in the engine such as flywheel, crankshaft and pistons. This is not the case when these masses are disconnected by using the clutch and can be slowed down or speeded up independently of the transmission.
  33. 4 points
    Glad she likes it. I thought it acted on a pressure sensor on the gear shift shaft and cut the ignition or fuel so that it didn’t create any harshness on the transmission. I bow to Simons knowledge. That’s another new thing I have learned today. Worrying really as the filing cabinet that is my brain is already full so something else must have fallen out of the back. Looks a great bike I am very envious.
  34. 4 points
    I get the best results with 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon and 0.04% carbon dioxide. Somewhat higher proportions of carbon dioxide will not affect tire pressure, but may have other negative side effects.
  35. 3 points
    Totally agree on carbs, horrible things with diagnosis by guessing and parts swapping because there is no practical physical test. Give me a blink code and multimeter over some old boy doing the tweak here, quarter turn there, sounds OK routine without knowing some bit of rubber is leaking. You have to praise Lexmoto for encouraging home maintenance. Was that on a UK site? Getting people to understand the machinery and not treat them as disposable black boxes full of demons I think is better for everyone and makes the ownership experience better. Getting over the fear of the orange vest clip board crowd and their US lawyers is a step in the right direction too. Andy
  36. 3 points
    Finally!! after 7 months my Cat N NC750SA 2016 was united with me (wife said, my face was glowing bright). The delivery driver mistakenly started it as they are supposed to check on delivery, I quickly switched it off. His mistake shows the battery is not drained and the vehicle starts. As per peace of mind and in the process of resurrection i would intend to do the following bits to clear the debris and change the broken clutch cover. 1.Drain the oil first. 2.Remove the clutch cover and check for debris. 3.Remove any debris if found and give a liquid clean for minute debris (pls suggest which liquid to be used, petrol???) 4.Fit the new clutch cover (bought for £50 from that site) using the instant gasket tube (halfords-granville) 5.Open the sump and clean it ---?????? please advice this is needed or not 5.Replace the oil filter with Hiflo HF 204-- (need to buy wrench) 6.Fill the oil and start the engine. Also need to replace clutch lever (thinking to change to short levers), front left winker(just glass cover) and need to sort left bar end (needs investigation as it all looks good from outside but woobly when fitted). Awaiting for weekend
  37. 3 points
    Do these things work as mudguards or are they to stop stones being fired back, or are they a way to let a bike with a 'tail tidy' still carry the legal rear end bits? To me they are nonsense, ugly and add un-sprung weight. Maybe the most daft idea ever. Even the typical far-too-short hugger makes more sense even if just to make the rear tyre not look so 'lonely' under a high tail.
  38. 3 points
    To be fair, that disc's probably only got a couple of thousand miles left in before it needs replacing
  39. 3 points
    You could check out WeMoto they do some good alternative disks (and pads) which ARE cheaper than Honda. I replaced both front and rear discs at around 120K miles with HONDA replacements. I prefer to use Honda brake pads - front tend to last ~25K and rear a bit more
  40. 3 points
    Well not the ideal weather for testing but had a little run out on the CB300R (thanks Grafton Honda), however as much as I wanted to fall in love, I didn't. Not necessarily a failing of the bike but my now pathological dislike of vibes from bar and/or seat, along with shall I just say lacklustre performance, which given it's a wee 300cc bike is maybe unfair of me but the online positivity (Mr Fish, Cageron2wheels etc) had wetted my appetite. It may be only 143kg wet but it doesn't have any urgency or torquey punch that I'd already experienced with both the Himilayan and especially MT03. I also didn't feel all-day comfy, which again maybe unfair of a small bike, but I've now (I think!) decided I need the taller dual-sport style bike ergos, so off to test the Versys 300 next Tues. Oh something else that was another black mark against the CB300R is there is no available topbox (Honda or Givi), apparently no available fixing solution. Maybe no biggie for a 2nd bike toy, but I'm trying to make the case to SWMBO that this is the cheap runabout for my occasional work (replacing now written off SH125), so daft as it sounds no top box = no sale. Plenty of deals to be done though, when I mentioned taller bikes and that the CRF250 Rally had been on my initial list, but removed because of minimal secondhand availability and unacceptable (for me) 5k+ new price they did make a tempting new bike deal for a stock model in black. But I kept my hand in my pocket (regular occurrence) until I've given the Kawasaki a chance (it is a twin, my favoured flavour) and a 4 year 0% deal at 4099 is available (a grand off rrp) so it would be remiss of me to not check that out first.
  41. 3 points
    Suddenly (and, seemingly, out of nowhere) I have a huge list of ‘must do’ jobs mostly because of my daughter moving. Getting over to the workshop to carry on with Percy is being pushed further and further into the future. A gentle statement like “FFS! I want to work on my bike!!” is met with “Carry on like that and I’ll put you on the naughty step..” and “You know you won’t ride it until the sun shines, anyway”. I bleeding give up. I ****ing hate winter!
  42. 3 points
    I think my history of BMW's, Ural and the Guzzi may have coloured my approach to changing gear. Clutch in, lift the lever and hold, clutch out while still holding the lever, relax. I also sing a song about combine harvesters to get the pace right. Andy
  43. 3 points
    Don't know about bikes, but in cars "shift energy management" has been around for decades, and usually employs some sort of soft re-instatement of power. In the old days of auto transmissions it was done usually by applying loads of ignition retard for an upshift and then ramping the ignition back up to where it should be, thus enabling the transmission to do the clutch/band stuff with reduced power and bringing it back in softly so it felt smoother for the car occupants without having to slip the clutches unnecessarily. Now we have electronic throttles and stuff to play with. My limited knowledge of old bike methodology was when riders simply used a push button kill switch while holding the throttle wide open, a reasonably skilled rider could do a quick upshift and get back on full power in a fraction of a second. I think this was used by BMW sidecar pilots to good effect. Mind you with old fashioned BMW gearboxes it made little difference whether you used the clutch or not, there was a similar kerlonk-bang whatever you did. As anyone used to an old R series will attest, getting a really nice smooth gearchange was something to be celebrated down the pub by buying a round for everyone.
  44. 3 points
    I’m going to make a locking tool (the job can easily be done without one really). The workshop is fully equipped with lathes and milling machines etc and, best of all, folks who know what they’re doing!
  45. 3 points
    I almost went for one after my SH300i. But as a 6'2 chap it was a little cramped. I like the looks except for the large exhaust. If they did the same as the CB125R it would be much better. I think they changed because on the 300R where that underslung exhaust would go there is an emissions can type of thing. Still a very decent machine with real world power.
  46. 3 points
    I don't se e the need for a quick shifter on a road bike. I can change going up the gears with no clutch smoothly and faster than using a clutch. Changing down is a slower process, but again in smooth relaxed riding it is most satisfying and smoother than using the clutch. But if block changing down the box then the clutch is essential!
  47. 3 points
    I don't use a dealer. I train them, so see the level of recruit, the pressure they put them under, the management etc. Some are OK, some shouldn't be trusted with lego, none take care I do with my own work. Andy
  48. 3 points
    It's like having 500 TV channels and then watching Corrie and Stenders, mostly just something to talk about down the pub. 10W97 fully sympathetic with added nigellium as used by TT winners just ticks boxes for some people. The dealers use 10W40 because they buy it in 50 gallon drums and can't be bothered to order anything special. Has anyone ever made a dealer change it again? Did they, or did they just write another bill out? They know naff all about DCT (or other things, for example that my CB handbook says oil at 8000 miles not 4000 as they told me when I picked it up) and don't care. Andy
  49. 3 points
    That was one of the reasons I advised to make your claim directly against the TP insurer. If 4D are messing your witness about I am happy to meet with him to obtain a Court compliant statement of truth. Just PM me the contact details and I will do it before they upset him and he decides to go away. Once you have that signed statement you will find the TP insurer will look to pay out. There is no ‘property’ or ownership of an independent witness so no issue with me getting a statement from him for you. Your policy will still be running and you can put a new bike on it. Provided you have not claimed against it for the total loss. 4D will want to slow this down as much as possible to extend your credit hire bike use as long as possible. The process should be to put you where you were before the incident and to compensate you for your bodily injury. It’s not about making out of it or screwing the insurers. That is a crazy idea that ends up with us paying the inflated bike premiums that we have to. 4D and the like are just out to slow it all down to make profit. I am not saying you want to profit from it but some of the knee jerk comments of other contributors are ridiculous. Let’s get you back on ,the road on a bike of your choosing and your injuries treated properly. 4D should have already referred you to a solicitor for your injuries and you should start chasing them to refer you to physio ASAP. I am happy to help out. You have my number.
  50. 3 points
    So decided to utilise the ‘ridge’ of plastic that sits behind the rear wheel. bought a stock scooter mud guard that comes with fixing bracket and costs 3.99 scissors are fine to cut it into a shape that sits just on the frame but that is too short to be rubbed by the wheel. the bracket is also soft aluminium and I cut it down to 11cm again with some scissors. Drilled a couple more holes then used it as a template against the ridge. no need to remove anything as the ride height easily accommodates the drill. Drilled through the ridge to accommodate the bolts that come with the mudguard. I just took the chain guard off for photos. Wiped some ACF on the bracket just to keep the rust away. it’s just a solution on the cheap as came in under a fiver.
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