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MikeBike

Which Fuel would you recommend for the NC?

Which Fuel would you recommend for the NC?  

144 members have voted

  1. 1. Which Fuel would you recommend for the NC? (ignore factors like there's a shell garage round the corner)

    • Regular unleaded 95 RON - cheapest you find (supermarket etc)
      87
    • Regular unleaded 95 RON - brand (Shell etc)
      28
    • Premium Unleaded 99 RON - cheapest you find (supermarket etc)
      10
    • Premium Unleaded 99 RON - (e.g. Shell Vpower etc)
      19
    • Other
      2


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MikeBike

Someone recently advised me to use the best rather than cheapest fuel for my NC - in Octane and quality - what do you use and what is your opinion as to pros and cons?

Is the extra price worth it. Maybe up to 10% more cost but about 5% more octane already, and supposedly other goodies in terms of keeping engine clean etc.

And does it matter from where (supermarket vs branded petrol)?

I was originally filling up using cheapest ASDA regular unleaded 've been filling up using Shell Vpower 99 octane for the last few tanks but haven't noticed any significant change in mpg yet.

Edited by MikeBike

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fred_jb

Someone recently advised me to use the best rather than cheapest fuel for my NC - in Octane and quality - what do you use and what is your opinion as to pros and cons?

Is the extra price worth it. Maybe up to 10% more cost but about 5% more octane already, and supposedly other goodies in terms of keeping engine clean etc.

And does it matter from where (supermarket vs branded petrol)?

I've been filling up using Shell Vpower 99 octane for the last few tanks but haven't noticed any significant change in mpg yet.

Hi Mike,

 

I've also tried both and don't notice any real difference.   I do use the higher octane where the only other choice is the E10 stuff, generally in France, which contains 10% ethanol, as I'm pretty dubious about putting this stuff in the bike.

 

Fred

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scara

Mike

This always causes debate

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Rev Ken

It isn't a highly stressed engine so won't benefit from high octane petrol, at least not as much as the extra cost. However some say that it is worth getting a 'branded' petrol as it is likely to have more cleansing additives that some supermarket petrols, but personally I go to the nearest convenient garage for mine!

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Steel Horse UK

Personally, I only use the higher Octane (97) as I am not using the NC to commute and it just feels to be more responsive for it and there is the benefit of a cleaner burn etc.

 -Mark-

 

.

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wozza

Premium super unleaded at my local Supermarket for me. If I'm out and about I still stick to premium at a 'branded' petrol station.

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dentonlad

I usually fill up at my local Morrison's. I have, in the past, used higher octane fuel occasionally. Where there was a small gain in mpg it wasn't justified by the extra cost.

I haven't noticed any difference in the way the bike runs when using higher octane fuel either, so I remain unconvinced of its benefits for the bikes I ride.

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GunnerNC

Thanks embee, seen a lot of information over the years about this subject but never an explanation detailed enough to have meaning yet simple enough for me to understand. I expect a lot of engineers 'know their stuff' but few have the talent to pass it on to non engineers. 

 

Now onto Quantum Physics!

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Steel Horse UK

Yeah, what Embee says. Just what I was thinking ... :ermm:

-Mark-

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JM750XDE

most expensive branded stuff, cos it make me feel good to do it :muttley:

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dazznutts

I usually stay clear of Asda Petrol as i have found i dont get good mpg on my car as well as the bike

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Dave H

I've tried premium fuels in the NC for several fillups but found no difference in urge or MPG.  My TDI Audi on the other hand got very gummed up on supermarket diesel (significant bio content) so I go out of my way to find a premium brand of diesel.

My brother in law worked at an oil refinery and told me when tankers call to fill up the premium fuel has additives pumped into the feed hose dependant on brand etc.  Sometimes they broke down.

I use super unleaded in my old sunbeam as the cheap stuff has a lot of ethanol in it and the moisture that seems to be released rots the tank.

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Thwaitie

I felt the higher octain was smoother, and more responsive especially at lower revs, in turn giving higher urban mileage.  But these slight advantages are outweighed by the difference in price, more so when burning up the miles nearer motorways speeds. 

Cheap supermarkets generally fulfil the need.

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mrgrumpy2

i always use petrol  :wacko:

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bonekicker

All the supermarket fuel come from the same fuel suppliers-- I tried higher octane and found no difference at all --But if you get some sort of weird pleasure out of paying more--who am I to disagree ??  :baby:

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Big Shot

I have noticed on previous bikes and cars over the years that high octane (99) works well on engines with turbos and superchargers and some manufactures even stipulate this. When I have made some mods to my bikes, filter, decat, exhaust etc even on little 250's 99 octane makes them run better and feel more responsive. I would be interested what a dyno would actually show

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Thwaitie

What did prove frustrating is the way they confusingly name these different octane fuels.

Given the choice of two green handled pumps labelled "Super" or "Premium", one could easily assume the latter represents the highest rated and thus more expensive option, when super simply infers an above average standard.

 

And I was disgusted when starting to fill at one station that displayed an acceptable premium price, when finding the only pump was in fact dispensing an atrociously expensive super grade. 

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embee

.........

I use super unleaded in my old sunbeam as the cheap stuff has a lot of ethanol in it and the moisture that seems to be released rots the tank.

All UK pump fuel is permitted to contain the same amount of alcohols, up to 5%, without having to specifically state the content. The introduction of 10% ethanol content (E10) raised the issue of maintaining  "protected fuels" with no more than 5% for the older fleet requirements, but as far as I'm aware that has not been necessary yet with the 5% limit remaining in force for anything not labelled as E10 or similar.

 

The issues with older vehicles isn't usually specifically to do with water, but the reactions you get between ethanol and certain metals such as "ternecoat" used for fuel tanks and certain combinations of copper based alloys, brasses etc and light metals, aluminium etc. Rubbers have to be selected carefully for compatibility with solvents and fuels, traditionally petrol environments used nitrile or more expensive "Viton" (fluorocarbon) or fluorosilicone rubbers, or PTFE. High ethanol content fuels can cause issues with nitrile (NBR etc) and fluorocarbons. For a guide to compatibilities see for example http://mykin.com/rubber-chemical-resistance-chart , for petrol see  "gasoline". It's a tricky business.

 

Most vehicles made in the last few years (I forget the cut-off) are compatible with E10, there are listings available confirming this if you search.

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MikeBike

E

 

As Mark says, always a topic of debate and everyone has an opinion.

Opinions are like ar$eholes, everyone has one but you don't usually want to hear it.

 

Here's mine. :devil:

 

...

Embee,

Thank you so much for all the detailed information. I have learned lots from reading it. I mistakenly thought the octange was a measure like calorific value. As GunnerNC says you have a knack of being able to express detailed technical information in a way which is undertsandable. NOt only that but it is interesting as well. You should write a book on everything youmight want to know and understand about how your car/bike works... And if there was a prize for the most useful contributor here, well,,, embee has it. I'm so glad we have you on the forum.

 

So back to cheapo unleaded for me... (except that comment about ASDA petrol)

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Rocker66

most expensive branded stuff, cos it make me feel good to do it :muttley:

As it does the Chancellor of the exchequer  :) :)

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aquaboy

Yes brilliant embee,

 

 

Just a thought,

 

If the higher octane stuff has more additives in it then surly you end up with less petrolly bang part for every litre you buy!!

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Robmdavies

I use Morrisons too, might as well collect points for £5 voucher, however I have noticed that the pumps don't show what the Ron value is?

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embee

 

If the higher octane stuff has more additives in it then surly you end up with less petrolly bang part for every litre you buy!!

I'm not sure what the exact values are but generally the additives are in very small quantities, so I wouldn't worry about losing any bang. Additives are something I'm aware of but have little real idea of the intricacies of the chemistry, just what they are there for. If you want a taster as to how geeky the subject is, try https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1,2-Diaminopropane

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TheEnglishman

I did a month(~1400 miles) of super unleaded with the NC and noticed absolutely no difference in performance or economy. 

 

My R1200GS really liked it though - I'd get 10-15% better economy for ~10% more cost, so was well worth it as I'd get 3 and a half days commuting instead of 3 so less filling up.

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