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Dunnster

NC700x Diy service @18,368 miles including valve clearances.

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Dunnster

Well it took me all day but I did it.

Coolant change, valve clearances checked/reset and oil and filter change. Removed the spark plugs to help with lining up timing marks, thanks to forum members suggestion it make the job easier.

Clearances before adjustment,

Cylinder one IN=.13mm

EX=.18mm

Cylinder two IN=.15mm

EX=.18mm

Reset back to tolerance IN=.17mm

EX=.28mm

First time I've ever attempted something as involving as this. Took my time and checked everything constantly. Took me all day, shattered now but chuffed to bits, got to know Nancy a bit more. Saved a packet by doing it myself which indirectly means free insurance this year.

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nelmo

Well done, did better than me - I managed to shear one of the cylinder head bolts by over-tightening it :-(

I adjusted the valves to be at the biggest extreme (loosest) so they now clatter away like a bag of spanners. Sounds bad but I found a thread about this where everyone said you can't cause any damage with loose valves and they always wear tight, so the looser the better. Hope that's true...

I was very shocked how tight my valves were (admittedly, I was at 20k miles) - my last bike never needed it's valves adjusting once in 96k miles (but they were shims).

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Spindizzy

I remember doing the valves on my ER5. I set them a little on the looser side within the tolerances as they had tightened up. It rattled a little more than before but its an assurance nothing is too tight. One of the selling points of the NC for me was its traditional nut and screw valves. I know shims stay in tolerance longer but I prefer the ease of the former.

 

Nice one Dunnster.

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Hati

Yup, all day was what it took me as well. Had to do the brake fluid change next day, but the point of it was exactly that, do it once, do it right.

 

Nelmo, man, you really shouldn't be doing your own servicing... Getting the valves right is not hard, book says resistance on the gauge, not "set the biggest gap you think you can get away with". All bolts have torque values given, for a reason might add, breaking them off on a modern bike should only happen if it's corroded or your torque wrench is faulty. When you get the valves set to spec, there is a noticeable increase in power, not to mention the feeling that the engine runs "just right". Feel sorry for the next owner of your bike.

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aldmannie

you can't cause any damage with loose valves and they always wear tight, so the looser the better. Hope that's true...

 

It's a fallacy.

Set them as per the manufacturer recommendation, not according to what some random guy on the internet says.

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Dunnster

I was a quite surprised at the initial clearance measurments after folk saying, "ah wouldn't bother checking them, it's a Honda". Wasn't going to bother taking the spark plugs out, as that's another thing I've never done before, was very apprehensive after hearing some horror stories.

I keep lusting after new bikes, but find myself looking at ease of service and MPG figures.

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bonekicker

We have to learn to service our own bikes--because it firstly saves a lot of money --and it also gets you to know your bike more-- just make sure you have the right tools before you start and if in doubt --double check--with the service book--or if not weekend here on the forum and I agree --set tappets as per manual -- well done Mike    :thumbsup:

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usabikes

Just did my coolant change and valve clearances. I left it 25,000 kms this time, double the usual and at the distance I hear the 750's are supposed to be checked at.

 

Inlets 1 thou tight. Exhausts 1 thou loose.

 

I adjusted the inlets and left the exhaust as is (it says plus or minus 1 thou and they will only tend to tighten one would think).

 

The job was pretty easy. Would have been much easier if the so-called mechanic at the so-called Honda Dealer had not used a rattle gun to install the 30mm inspection cap over the crankshaft nut :devil: Had to use a cold chisel to shift it :devil: :devil: Struth guys it's just a cover - just tweak it up OK?!?!

 

The good news: a replacement is priced fairly.

The bad news: It takes a month to get one from Japan :devil: :devil: :devil: 

 

Mark Barrett's Service Manual for the 700 was very useful (it's on fleabay) and I took his advice to smear some Copper Coat on the bung's threads - like I do eveything else. Shouldn't happen again (we hope).

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nelmo

It's a fallacy.

Set them as per the manufacturer recommendation, not according to what some random guy on the internet™ says.

What, like you are? The other random guy on the Internet said he had asked his mechanic who said that and then a string of other random guys agreed with him. So my string of random guys beats your one :-)

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nelmo

 

Nelmo, man, you really shouldn't be doing your own servicing... Getting the valves right is not hard, book says resistance on the gauge, not "set the biggest gap you think you can get away with". All bolts have torque values given, for a reason might add, breaking them off on a modern bike should only happen if it's corroded or your torque wrench is faulty. When you get the valves set to spec, there is a noticeable increase in power, not to mention the feeling that the engine runs "just right". Feel sorry for the next owner of your bike.

What sort of attitude is that from a 'just do it' Aussie? Where's the pioneer spirit? You've become institutionalised, only advising the safe option, too scared to step outside the norm. Your ancestors are cringing... What's next? No more shrimps on the barbie in case of food poisoning?

Point made, I think :-)

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Hati

We never did "shrimps", it's called "prawns" down here :P.

 

The "just do it" is still alive and kicking, but these days the "Clarkson method" (i.e. a hammer will fix everything) is a bit of an old news, we have gotten a little more sophisticated and seem to have smartened up enough to first learn about the shit we are doing, unlike, it seems, some of our "ancestors" who are still stuck with the "Clarkson method". Good luck to you with it. Like I said above, feel sorry for the poor sod who will end up with your bike..

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aldmannie

Please, please, in engineering there is no such thing as a hammer.

What you need is a reciprocating tolerance adjuster, the skill is in selecting one of the correct weight and shape for the job.

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Tex

 Like I said above, feel sorry for the poor sod who will end up with your bike..

 

Oh, I don't know, I've seen dealers do worse jobs. And it's his bike, if he wants to run it with the valve set towards the looser end of the manufacturers recommended tolerances (which, as I understand it, is what he's done) then it's his choice.

 

Just out of interest, does the 'Clarkson' method you mention have anything to do with the former presenter of 'Top Gear'? :D

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Hati

Just out of interest, does the 'Clarkson' method you mention have anything to do with the former presenter of 'Top Gear'? :D

 

It has EVERYTHING to do with him :D

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Tex

It has EVERYTHING to do with him :D

 

Yes, I thought that might be the case.. :D

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SteveThackery

We have to learn to service our own bikes--because it firstly saves a lot of money --and it also gets you to know your bike more--      :thumbsup:

 

I intend to service mine when it's out of warranty, but having tried to trade my Versys in, which has been serviced by me for the past five years, the dealer said that the absence of a properly stamped service history reduces the resale value.

 

I haven't bothered to find out by how much, though.  Just wanted to mention it.

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bonekicker

Steve---  the dealer said that the absence of a properly stamped service history reduces the resale value

 

​I was in a Honda main dealership and the service man was stamping a service book to bring it up to date--so why -- and how can it reduce the resale value--it may only be another way to give you less money for your bike-- only believe and trust someone who loves you very much and believe me the Honda salesperson does not love you at all---only your money  :baby: 

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coopers12345

I intend to service mine when it's out of warranty, but having tried to trade my Versys in, which has been serviced by me for the past five years, the dealer said that the absence of a properly stamped service history reduces the resale value.

 

I haven't bothered to find out by how much, though.  Just wanted to mention it.

Get yourself a stamp made and ordered online to stamp the book.

Traded in my Mondeo a few years ago which I'd serviced myself and stamped with a stamp we'd got from work when they closed. Salesman even commented that it was good to see it had been serviced annually despite low miles each year(Had the use of a company car at the time so only used mine for the occasional blast). Company I worked for had gone bust 18 months before but according to the book managed to service it twice after that!

 

The stamps shouldn't make any difference to the value though as long as you can show that it's been serviced regularly.

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Tonyj

Simple fact for me when people say they home service how do you know. ? You don't , same for the kid who gets to change you oil while he is training at the dealership but one is accredited , one ain't . I'll take the stamped book all day long. Sorry

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Dunnster

Simple fact for me when people say they home service how do you know. ? You don't , same for the kid who gets to change you oil while he is training at the dealership but one is accredited , one ain't . I'll take the stamped book all day long. Sorry

I keep all the receipts of parts bought and used during servicing that I do. I keep a record of everything I've done to the bike when ever it's needed, e.g. Date time and mileage of new tyres etc.

I can't see what's different to having a stamp in a log book? How can you tell the works been carried out just from a dealers stamp? If diy work is backed up with evidence, having a look at the machine and chatting with the owner I think you can make up a decision and use your judgement.

It has been suggested that some dealers have fraudulently stamped log books to then falsify a FDSH.

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sykospain

There's no limit to what some dealers can get up to, in the shop and in the office.  That's capitalism, boys.  Make the money, not the customer satisfaction.

Like privatised energy- and water-suppliers, public transport operators, education providers - not forgetting Spanish bankers, dozens of whom are currently having their collars felt.

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Tonyj

And I refer back to my point , it's people that are the problem . They lie.

Trust is the main point and I can return to said dealer and most probably get a satisfactory conclusion . Where has the private I'm your best mate and my book has not been stamped by a dodgy friend at the dealers etc . I'd get told "well it was alright when I sold it " attitude works both ways .

I'm well aware that to buy a bike from someone who has looked after his machine and kept it in a heated garage with carpet on the floor , an enthusiast shall we say is a better proposition then a small for profit dealer but this is a hard call because you have to get the planets to align . Not always this simple a choice .

I've just sold and bought from a dealer who offers me a decent cost to change my Nc for a new one . The service book and service schedule is correct on mine and all by Honda tech . He knows the bike and trust me . It works both ways .

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sykospain

Very true Tony - and in fact we're both of us lucky in being able to deal with a trustworthy salesperson or técnico.  But many others don't have that luxury and pay through the nose for unsatisfactory work by an uncaring and slipshod profiteering outfit.

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