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JM750XDE

Chain and sprocket - 10k mileage - deemed to tight to survive

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Saskbiker

Those stats on chain life can be doubled at least if you keep the chain continuously lubed with any version of automatic oiler.

I have used Scott and Tuturo brands. The one on my 2016 is Tuturo. I fit the dispenser nozzle to the down stream side of the front sproket instesd of traditional rear sproket location. Way less obtrusive looking and i say it lubes better in that postion as well. The key to long chain and sprocket life moreso than the chain quality itself, is lube.

On bikes the duty cycle tends to be over lubed when we do lube them then run to way to dry before we get to it again.  Worse if you get lazy. I believe the rate of application was 50 ml to about 3000km to keep mine just nicely wetter and not a flinging mess.

I had over 20kkm on a 2002 650 klr chain. It still measured almost new specs. The constant correct lube is what saved it.

Invest in an oiler when you replace your chain and sprockets. And definitely use endless link chain even on low go machines.

 

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Mike5100

Fwiw I think the chain on the NC is very poor spec as oem. I had 3 NC bike’s and all had seized links by 10 or 11kmiles. Now I have got an Africa Twin, have used the same chain care regime and yet I am already at 16k miles with apparently plenty of life left in the chain

if I get another nc750 I will get the chain changed for a better quality one but only at the 8k service because mine seemed fine to that point

mike

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trisaki

My original chain on my nc has reached  12500 m and might think about  changing  it when I come back from my Scottish jaunt next month -looking at dry rusty chains on fellow ncers bikes today  down at haynes museum  I'm not surprised  chains need changing  at low miles 

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MikeBike

My standard OEM (DID) chain with a Tutoro oiler was fine up to 16000miles without moving from the new adjustment mark but sufferred from some stiff links. Now uprated to a DID VX2 chain.

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Mike5100

Yeah that’s what I did mike. But I parted with the Bike before the new chain got many k under its belt. Surely even a few stiff/seized links means the chain is shot doesn’t it?  It’s got to make the effective length considerably shorter and therefore much too tight 🤔

mike

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Wedgepilot

The OEM chain is fine if you lube it regularly. I've just changed mine because the front sprocket was wearing and i wanted to change the chain at the same time. The tech doing the work said the old chain was in great condition, nothing wrong with it.

 

This was a 5 year old chain with 19k on it, used for commuting all year round in all weather. I give it a quick lube every Friday evening when I get home from work, takes 5 mins with a centre stand and grease ninja.

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MikeBike
1 hour ago, Mike5100 said:

Yeah that’s what I did mike. But I parted with the Bike before the new chain got many k under its belt. Surely even a few stiff/seized links means the chain is shot doesn’t it?  It’s got to make the effective length considerably shorter and therefore much too tight 🤔

mike

Yes, I replaced it when  found out it had stiff links, sorry if my post was confusing.

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PoppetM

My first one lasted 8,000 miles, my second one is still doing well with 14,000 miles on it.  Centre stand and a spray of lube if it's been a wet ride, or 200 miles reached, whichever is first. Takes five minutes and gives me the opportunity to inspect the rear tyre for anything nasty I may have picked up on the ride.  

 

My bike is parked in all weathers and not covered when I am at work, so a couple of links do show a little rust on the outside, but in comparison to some of the commuter bikes I park with, it's in good nick! 

Edited by PoppetM
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Steveb2418
3 hours ago, PoppetM said:

My first one lasted 8,000 miles, my second one is still doing well with 14,000 miles on it.  Centre stand and a spray of lube if it's been a wet ride, or 200 miles reached, whichever is first. Takes five minutes and gives me the opportunity to inspect the rear tyre for anything nasty I may have picked up on the ride.  

 

My bike is parked in all weathers and not covered when I am at work, so a couple of links do show a little rust on the outside, but in comparison to some of the commuter bikes I park with, it's in good nick! 

Poppet.  I get the impression you work in Richmond upon Thames ?  I spent some of my Met service at Richmond police stn. I understand it’s been sold off and is now a Pizza restaurant?  Good memories of the place, sad to see it go, but that’s progress ??? 

 

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Grumpy old man
On 4/15/2018 at 16:29, Mike5100 said:

 

if I get another nc750 I will get the chain changed for a better quality one but only at the 8k service because mine seemed fine to that point

mike

Hi Mike

Thinking of another NC?

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PoppetM
2 hours ago, Steveb2418 said:

Poppet.  I get the impression you work in Richmond upon Thames ?  I spent some of my Met service at Richmond police stn. I understand it’s been sold off and is now a Pizza restaurant?  Good memories of the place, sad to see it go, but that’s progress ??? 

 

I do indeed but only for next 8 weeks.... hadnt realised it had changed into a pizza restaurant....will go check it out!

The MET have moved down next to the church on Manor Circus Roundabout a much bigger building!

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Mike5100

Who knows Lloyd. The NC May be more manageable when I’m over 70 😀😀

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Graham NZ
On 5/5/2017 at 09:53, Kooglesac said:

Thanks for your input. Not sure I want to take swing arm off so will likely buy loose link and rivet it myself. Any suggestions as to where is the best place to purchase chain and sprocket kit for 2014 750x manual?  

There are good chain breaking and riveting kits available and good videos on how to do a riveting job. 

Without those or good experience I would have the job done professionally and I would never consider removing the swing-arm just to replace a chain.

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slowboy

Thank for posting that one Graham, it's a good guide, anyone with a bit of mechanical nous and the right tools (the Vernier calipers are essential) should be able to make a good joint. Never had any issues with mine over many (too many) years.

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