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pjm

Puncture Sealant

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pjm    1,044
pjm

As you probably know the Africa Twin has tubed tyres. Obviously it is too much of a task, for me, to change a tube at the side of the road so I was wondering if any of you guys had experience of the puncture sealant gunks that go in the the tubes to prevent punctures. I regularly check my tyres for anything sharp and have TPMS set up. I am just concerned as to try and prevent being sidelined by a puncture. I assume that Honda Assistance would not have the capability to repair a tubed tyre puncture.

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Spindizzy    1,743
Spindizzy
17 minutes ago, pjm said:

As you probably know the Africa Twin has tubed tyres. Obviously it is too much of a task, for me, to change a tube at the side of the road so I was wondering if any of you guys had experience of the puncture sealant gunks that go in the the tubes to prevent punctures. I regularly check my tyres for anything sharp and have TPMS set up. I am just concerned as to try and prevent being sidelined by a puncture. I assume that Honda Assistance would not have the capability to repair a tubed tyre puncture.

As its tubed you wont have any corrosion issues putting sealant fluid in. Vehicles use fluid to self balance wheels in some cases so it wont cause any issue with that. You may even be able to remove wheel weights if you use a sealing fluid.

 

Try googling liquid wheel balance, it works plus you get to seal punctures in your case.

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Tex    8,298
Tex
43 minutes ago, pjm said:

 I assume that Honda Assistance would not have the capability to repair a tubed tyre puncture.

 

You assume correctly. But they do have a natty little fold away trailer in the back of their van. As far as I know the sealant fluid is designed to work with tubeless tyres, but there may well be advances that have taken place that I'm unaware of.. 

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pjm    1,044
pjm

OKO do one they give 95% effectiveness in tubeless and 75% in tubed. Suppose it is worth a shot and being inside the tube its away from the wheel except in a puncture episode. 

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pjm    1,044
pjm

Might pop out for a spin to Forest Row if you are about for a coffee tomorrow. 11:30 ish.

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Tex    8,298
Tex

I will see what 'er indoors has planned.. The OKO stuff could be worth a try. I might even get some for the Bonnie. Back in the day I would carry spare tubes and the stuff necessary to fit them. Can't be bothered now! I need a cast wheel conversion! :D 

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DaveM59    587
DaveM59

Sealant in tubes is much less effective than in tubed, as once the tube is holed the seal to the rim around the valve is lost and that takes a lot of sealing, plus the hole in the tyre and in the tube are separated as the tube deflates so sealant has to try to fix three holes at the same time, and that assumes the tyre beads stay put in the rims.

Tubed tyres just have the one hole which in itself is partially plugged by the object that caused the puncture.
Slime was the first sealant originally for pushbikes and so was used in tubed tyres, but it's primary purpose was for high pressure racing tyres on road bikes and IIRC Ultraseal started the trend for mtorcycles. Cars had various pressurised latex aerosols used after a puncture to seal and re-inflate which are semi permanent as you cannot clean it out for a vulcanised repair like the Ultraseal/Slime type. Holts Tyreweld can be washed out as can most of the types new cars have instead of a spare wheel.

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Marvincon    99
Marvincon

I put 'Bike seal' in my CB1100 ex tubed tyres, easy to put in and again 75% effective. Check their website for further info. Never had a puncture with it in, but never had one without it. Psychologically it made me feel more confident but in the first 30 years of my motorcycling life, all on tubed tyres I can't remember a puncture. 

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Tex    8,298
Tex
10 hours ago, pjm said:

Might pop out for a spin to Forest Row if you are about for a coffee tomorrow. 11:30 ish.

 

Sorry Peter, not happening.. :( 

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Gasman    172
Gasman

I know from experience Honda Assist will not repair on road side! If you can carry a spare tube it is worth it because it is as likely as not that the garage it is taken to will not have the right size tube in stock. As I had a spare the lovely people down at Tippetts Honda squeezed me in and had me away again within 3hrs of getting the bike to them. Not bad considering it was Friday afternoon. My understanding of most mousses and tyre balls is they are primarily for off road use and start to disintegrate after 80mph. If you want to go tubeless the two most popular routes seem to be either Alpina wheels or sealing the spokes with Outex or 3m tape

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Rocker66    7,944
Rocker66
11 hours ago, pjm said:

Might pop out for a spin to Forest Row if you are about for a coffee tomorrow. 11:30 ish.

Is this the NC meet Sunday?

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Tex    8,298
Tex

No, that's next week. 2nd Sunday of the month. Classic cars and stuff. Still never managed to get to one.. :( 

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pjm    1,044
pjm

I am going to go to the coffee shop in Forest Row itself. I aim to be there for about 11:30. I am going anyway so if you can make it great. If not no problem. Weather window to good to miss

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Rocker66    7,944
Rocker66
17 minutes ago, Tex said:

No, that's next week. 2nd Sunday of the month. Classic cars and stuff. Still never managed to get to one.. :( 

Thanks might make it but will depend on how much I have to drink at our anniversary meal the night before.

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Andy m    2,181
Andy m

I will no longer put gunk in tyres before they puncture. The scenario

 

Gunk filled tyre gets a nail in it.

The nail makes a hole which the gunk seals and you don't notice

The nail continues making holes which then join together to form a rip too big to seal.

Up a country road in the back end of Brittany on a Saturday afternoon you now need levers, a tube and whatever workshop equipment is required to get past the manufacturers sabotage (fitting TL tyres so you need a bead breaker etc.).

 

I was lucky, the worlds smallest, dirtiest, insanest and surliest Polish tyre fitter at a scooter dealership stayed open until 5.15 to fix it. The only pain was the fifteen Gaulois I passively smoked while he swore at me and the rest of the world in Franco-Polish.

 

If the first hole had resulted in a flat the gloop would let you ride to a tyre place. It would also have sprayed a lot less into the rim which disolved about 3 years later. Put it in after and pump up with a compressor or soda stream cartridges.

 

For warm places where you can't get a decent cuppa I would make sure lubed (use windolene) TT tyres are fitted and carry levers, tubes and patches. Only takes 15 minutes and leaves you at 100% to carry on.

 

Those tyre valves that turn red when the the pressure is low are in my professional opinion ****ing lethal. They are two chinese monkey metal cylinders pushed inside each other with an O-ring rolling along the sharp edges. They exploded when we went 30% over the working pressure, firing the inner cylinder across the workshop and exhausting the entire air supply in seconds. If you want this rubbish as the only thing between you and a very sudden loss of air go for it. I'd use a decent gauge once a week or buy a TUV approved electronic TPMS (I can sell you a good one if you have 10 22 inch tyres and 24 volts available :)  )

 

Andy

Edited by Andy m
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Dave H    693
Dave H

Sods law says you'll need a new tyre at the most inconvenient place.  I realised this just outside a very small town on the Norwegian/Finnish border.  The only garage was a snowmobile dealer so I called in to get some advice.  An hour later he had a new tyre in his hands delivered from Alta.  He then fitted it, swearing loudly in Norwegian/Finnish as I'd put gloop/Gunk in the tyre and it made a fair mess of his tyre kit.

I've never used it since relying, instead, on plugs.

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pjm    1,044
pjm

I am currently sitting outside a lovely coffee shop in Forest Row. European guy in his late fifties wanders out on crutches to get on a scooter that I parked next to. His son then takes the crutches and the guy gets on the scooter. I assume his wife and a 12 year old girl comes out. The girl gets on the back in a t shirt and jeans and NO helmet and off they go. I give the mum a tug and advise of the helmet law. She was completely oblivious and said It's only a short ride home. Unbelievable. Back on topic. The trouble is the bike has tubed tyres. If tubeless I would carry the repair kit but the thought of removing the wheels at the side of the road let alone breaking the bead on the rear tyre makes it a non starter. 

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Defender    588
Defender
1 hour ago, pjm said:

I am currently sitting outside a lovely coffee shop in Forest Row. European guy in his late fifties wanders out on crutches to get on a scooter that I parked next to. His son then takes the crutches and the guy gets on the scooter. I assume his wife and a 12 year old girl comes out. The girl gets on the back in a t shirt and jeans and NO helmet and off they go. I give the mum a tug and advise of the helmet law. She was completely oblivious and said It's only a short ride home. Unbelievable. Back on topic. The trouble is the bike has tubed tyres. If tubeless I would carry the repair kit but the thought of removing the wheels at the side of the road let alone breaking the bead on the rear tyre makes it a non starter. 

You can't fix stupid!

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Rev Ken    1,891
Rev Ken
9 hours ago, Marvincon said:

I put 'Bike seal' in my CB1100 ex tubed tyres, easy to put in and again 75% effective. Check their website for further info. Never had a puncture with it in, but never had one without it. Psychologically it made me feel more confident but in the first 30 years of my motorcycling life, all on tubed tyres I can't remember a puncture. 

I've had three blow outs in 60 years, all with tubed tyres. The few punctures I have with tubeless tyres 'let go' far more slowly with no drama. So my vote is for tubeless, unless of course I get an old Brit bike again!

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pjm    1,044
pjm

I have been fortunate to have only picked up one puncture in 44 years of riding. Tubeless front tyre on a blade in 1997, on the A23 running in to Brighton. Cost me a new tyre. Today I did my tyre check and found a small shard of stone embedded in the front tyre. Pried it out and it was a sharp as a nail and I am sure if I had not done so it would have resulted in a puncture. Why is it some people get puncture after puncture? Are they commuting and filtering in the urban detritus that collects at the kerb and in the centre of the road or is it just simply bad luck? I have probably jinxed myself now but will stick the OKA in and keep my fingers crossed.

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Gasman    172
Gasman
21 hours ago, DaveM59 said:

Sealant in tubes is much less effective than in tubed, as once the tube is holed the seal to the rim around the valve is lost and that takes a lot of sealing, plus the hole in the tyre and in the tube are separated as the tube deflates so sealant has to try to fix three holes at the same time, and that assumes the tyre beads stay put in the rims.

Tubed tyres just have the one hole which in itself is partially plugged by the object that caused the puncture.
Slime was the first sealant originally for pushbikes and so was used in tubed tyres, but it's primary purpose was for high pressure racing tyres on road bikes and IIRC Ultraseal started the trend for mtorcycles. Cars had various pressurised latex aerosols used after a puncture to seal and re-inflate which are semi permanent as you cannot clean it out for a vulcanised repair like the Ultraseal/Slime type. Holts Tyreweld can be washed out as can most of the types new cars have instead of a spare wheel.

Dave I think u might have got your tubes and tubeless mixed up😀🤣

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Tex    8,298
Tex

Folks who ride mostly in dry weather get fewer punctures. So I should be all right then! :D 

 

Had several over the years, but only one 'blow out' - terrifying!

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Mac750    2,562
Mac750

One of the few boons of small split rim wheels fitted to scooters was the ability to carry a complete spare wheel and tyre  ready to fit. Then later being able to split the rim extract the tube repair it and refit it. 

This led to multiple repair patches, bad idea, the use of bald tyres as "a spare just in case" and once a small 8 or 10 inch tube punctured it was wibbly, wobbly and off. 

So now they have brought out tubeless rims for classic scooters. The only problem is the wheel nuts (x4) don't stay tight resulting in the front or rear wheel falling off the hub. Another wibbly, wobbly and off. 

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trisaki    601
trisaki

I use bike seal in my X supposed to be non corrosive  and works with inner tubes   will see  how well it works  /or not in the future  

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pjm    1,044
pjm

I have got the OKO sealant and a jumbo syringe to make sure I get it right and will put it in as soon as I get a chance.

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