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Ashley

Do you find the NC750X suspension hard?

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SteveThackery

Oh, one last thing:  I recommend you forget the calculations entirely.  Just stick the suspension unit on the bike, then adjust the preload collar until the static loaded sag is around 50mm.*  Job done.  :)

 

*You'll need some way of getting the back wheel off the ground - a centre stand, or jack under the engine, but not a paddock stand of course! - so you can measure from the axle up to the seat when the suspension unit is topped out.  Then measure again when it's on the ground and you're sitting on the bike.  It helps greatly to have an assistant.

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larryblag
On 03/03/2018 at 19:03, djsb said:

The stiffness of the spring is NOT altered by the spring preload. All the spring preload does is compensate for the STATIC weight of the bike. So, if the free length of the spring is compressed by say 9mm due to the weight of the bike then 9mm of preload can be put onto the spring to maintain the same height. That's how I understand it anyway. Could be wrong though.

Hooks law again I presume, which applies to extension or compression of springs (assuming a linear coil of course - dual rate springs will affect the physics in a way that is far above my 'O' level physics) :cry:

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trisaki
On 09/08/2018 at 22:56, SteveThackery said:

Oh, one last thing:  I recommend you forget the calculations entirely.  Just stick the suspension unit on the bike, then adjust the preload collar until the static loaded sag is around 50mm.*  Job done.  :)

 

*You'll need some way of getting the back wheel off the ground - a centre stand, or jack under the engine, but not a paddock stand of course! - so you can measure from the axle up to the seat when the suspension unit is topped out.  Then measure again when it's on the ground and you're sitting on the bike.  It helps greatly to have an assistant.

Rider sag not static sag 

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Graham NZ

So much has been posted on this forum about suspension and so much seems to have been forgotten.

Unladen sag is how much the suspension settles with the bike on it's wheels with no fuel, rider, any pillion or luggage added.

Laden sag is with fuel, rider, any pillion and luggage added.

Adjusting spring preload alters the ride height not the spring strength.

The forks on the NC bikes are old fashioned technology and virtually impossible to improve enough to match modern standards.

The rear suspension can be made very good with a change to a better quality suspension unit.

It's easy to spend a lot of money when improving suspension, so beware.

For bikes like the NC models it's compliance (comfort over bumpy surfaces) rather than road-holding (wheels not leaving the ground) which is worth pursuing. (Road race bikes have very firm suspension.)

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SteveThackery
On 8/15/2018 at 07:19, trisaki said:

Rider sag not static sag 

 

You are mixing up two different concepts.  There is loaded/laden and unloaded/unladen sag.  I don't think the term "rider sag" is widely used, but I assume it's just another term for loaded sag.  ("Laden/unladen" is grammatically correct, but loads of people use "loaded/unloaded" these days.)

 

And then there is static sag and dynamic sag.  Static sag is when the bike is stationary, dynamic sag is when the bike is being ridden on the anticipated terrain (roads, off-road).  They are sometimes different because asymmetrical damping can "pump" the bike away from its static laden sag height.

 

So there are actually four terms to consider:  static laden, static unladen, dynamic laden and (in theory) dynamic unladen.  The last one isn't real, of course, because you don't see a bike going around a track without a rider.

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