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AceTallPaul

Winterising - LEDs and Heated Grips

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AceTallPaul

I’m coming into first winter on 2018 X DCT. I’ve read quite a few posts about various light and heat options.  Could do with views from those who have done it on:

  1. Which LED spots to fit.  Want good quality, as bright as possible....!
  2. How easy are they to fit (given no real experience of bike DIY).  Taking off fairings and attching cables to battery etc - simple, or complex.
  3. Planning to fit to a GIVI engine guard - also simple?
  4. When doing this, I assume fitting Oxford grips to battery at the same time should be straightforward

 

Don’t want to pay a dealer a fortune to fit if this is easy.  But don’t want to mess up if it is hard....!

 

thanks

 

 

Paul

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SebSeb

From my experience on other bikes. 

I would do all myself, but it depends on you DIY skills to be honest. If you are okay with tools, know how to use meter, can read and understand workshop manual then why not give a go. 

 

LEDs - I'm still on the same subject. Proper one are expensive. Saying that on Forza I had cheap, Chinese LED strips which I mounted on hand guards and was very pleased. Depends what you want really. 

 

Heated grips are brilliant. Fitted them on my XJ6 and was very pleased. On Forza I went with heated gloves. My opinion is that grips are more convenient. With gloves you have those cables that you need to feed through the jacket, connect cables together etc. But they are wrapping up your hand and fingers where grips are nice, hot pipes you grab. 

I commute 50 miles one way so gloves are worth hassle. I may go further and get body warmer as well :)

If I would do less miles, then probably heated grips and muffs or hand guards.

Grips and gloves go straight to the battery (with fuse) or to sub harness. 

 

Engine guards; if you refer to those pipes then fairly easy. But if you are not sure you can do this yourself, hold fire on heated grips :) just saying. 

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AceTallPaul

I've gone ahead and ordered these Givi S322 LED lights, plus the engine guard.  Apparently they come with a cable and fuse to go straight onto the battery.


They also have an "extra" wire to go onto a switched supply.  But I don't really know where to find that.  I've read about rear light cables and various others, but not clear step by step on how you actually get to these and attach the other cable.

 

I had a look at the Fuzeblock, but that all seemed a bit complicated for now, so just a direct connection without having to remove lots of panels etc.

 

I'm still a bit nervous about the heated grips and cutting off existing ones to fit them, but I'll give it a go. these ones, I think... Oxford Advanced Adventure Grips

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SebSeb

Nice. Let me know once you have LEDs fitted how they are performing. 

 

As long as you'll follow Oxford fitting manual you'll be fine. Only tricky but which is found was that once you apply glue on the handlebars, you do not have much time to push grips on and adjust them. Once it sticks then that's it...

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klrman
23 minutes ago, SebSeb said:

 

 

As long as you'll follow Oxford fitting manual you'll be fine. Only tricky but which is found was that once you apply glue on the handlebars, you do not have much time to push grips on and adjust them. Once it sticks then that's it...

If you're using the Oxford supplied glue, then alas, that's not it. Their cheapo isocyanate loosens up under higher heat settings and can allow the grip to lose adhesion  on the bar. So, in the event you do get it slightly out of position,  you may be able to rectify the situation after final wiring. More expensive superglue, Loctite  for example, will give a more permanent fix

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rjp996

I can recommend 'no nonsense superglue' 20g from screwfix for about £1.50. 

I tried all source of glues and this one has kept solid now for 2 years. It's got a slightly higher temperature range than the normal retail locktight glue. I looked at the specialist high temp superglues but were expensive - tried this one first and it's been great. 

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Timbo
On 08/09/2018 at 08:37, AceTallPaul said:

I’m coming into first winter on 2018 X DCT. I’ve read quite a few posts about various light and heat options.  Could do with views from those who have done it on:

  1. Which LED spots to fit.  Want good quality, as bright as possible....!
  2. How easy are they to fit (given no real experience of bike DIY).  Taking off fairings and attching cables to battery etc - simple, or complex.
  3. Planning to fit to a GIVI engine guard - also simple?
  4. When doing this, I assume fitting Oxford grips to battery at the same time should be straightforward

 

Don’t want to pay a dealer a fortune to fit if this is easy.  But don’t want to mess up if it is hard....!

 

thanks

 

 

Paul

Hi Paul. Before you spend any money on heated grips please consider another option. I ride all through the winter every weekday. I've tried many different bikes and many different heated grips and handguards. They all work.. ish, but whilst your palms are hot your fingers are cold. The best thing by a long way are the Keis heated under gloves that my son bought me from J&S for about £70. They heat your fingers all the way to the tips.  I have now gone through two winters without heated grips and just these Keis gloves and they're ace,  nice and toasty. However, you do need to buy  new pair of oversized winter gloves as your normal gloves won't go over these, they'll be too tight and stop them working / blood circulation. For £53 I bought  great pair of gloves suitable for giants and shovel hands and they work great as they are not tight over the Keis. 

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baben
1 hour ago, Timbo said:

Hi Paul. Before you spend any money on heated grips please consider another option. I ride all through the winter every weekday. I've tried many different bikes and many different heated grips and handguards. They all work.. ish, but whilst your palms are hot your fingers are cold. The best thing by a long way are the Keis heated under gloves that my son bought me from J&S for about £70. They heat your fingers all the way to the tips.  I have now gone through two winters without heated grips and just these Keis gloves and they're ace,  nice and toasty. However, you do need to buy  new pair of oversized winter gloves as your normal gloves won't go over these, they'll be too tight and stop them working / blood circulation. For £53 I bought  great pair of gloves suitable for giants and shovel hands and they work great as they are not tight over the Keis. 

Plus one for this. I am also a total convert to a heated jacket. The gloves plug into short leads from the ends of the sleeves so there is no nonsense trying to thread wires down your arms. I have never had to have the jacket on anything other than low power as it is so toasty. I believe they do heated long johns too.....

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Rocker66
1 hour ago, baben said:

Plus one for this. I am also a total convert to a heated jacket. The gloves plug into short leads from the ends of the sleeves so there is no nonsense trying to thread wires down your arms. I have never had to have the jacket on anything other than low power as it is so toasty. I believe they do heated long johns too.....

That was the set up I used when commuting although mine was Gebring.

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AceTallPaul

Thanks for the tips - but I’ve already done the grips !

 

if it gets really cold I might look at the liners too. I’d seen some gloves / jackets, but I’ve already invested in Rukka gear and didn’t want to compromise that.   Hadn’t see liners, though....

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baben

The Keiss jacket just goes under my Klim jacket. I wear a T shirt to keep it off my skin or it can burn me!

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DelBoy

I too have a heated jacket and grips.

 

However I now feel that if it is so cold that I require the heated jacket, than maybe it may be too cold for my tyres to grip properly.

 

My winterisation of my bike is thus:

 

Give bike a good clean

Lube with ACF-50

Put bike in garage and leave until circa March

Use car.

 

 

Sorted :thumbsup:

 

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pjm

If you have to ride in winter I would strongly handlebar muffs. If you have them combined with heated grips you will never have cold hands and can wear  summer gloves. It ends up being like little ovens and you rarely have to have the heated grips on more than setting 2 or 3. 

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Exceledsteve
11 minutes ago, pjm said:

If you have to ride in winter I would strongly handlebar muffs. If you have them combined with heated grips you will never have cold hands and can wear  summer gloves. It ends up being like little ovens and you rarely have to have the heated grips on more than setting 2 or 3. 

This is my preferred solution too at the moment. I think in future I might try the heated inner gloves combined with the muffs. I can take both with me then when I sell the bike. 

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maltpress

Can anyone suggest any muffs? I've been thinking about handguards because I'm nervous of muffs being a faff to get hands in and out of, especially when wiping a wet visor, but they look a a lot more affordable and do away with the worry about compatible screens.

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pjm

Tucano Urbano. I have used several of their designs and they are remarkably easy to get your hands in and out of. It quickly becomes second nature. Albeit lovely when the spring comes and you can take them off.

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Exceledsteve

+1 for Tucano Urbano. They have a stiff outer collar which keeps them open enough to slip in and out of easily. They make a massive difference in winter, especially with heated gloves/grips. The coldest of mornings are not painful with this setup... far from it. 

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portly
On 16/10/2018 at 21:59, pjm said:

If you have to ride in winter I would strongly handlebar muffs. If you have them combined with heated grips you will never have cold hands and can wear  summer gloves. It ends up being like little ovens and you rarely have to have the heated grips on more than setting 2 or 3. 

I'd say +1 on this option .. with heated grips for added comfort. I used them through last winter and they worked well. 

 

My thinking is, that although not the most stylish of looks, if you're daft enough to ride in cold weather like that (I am) then who cares what you look like .. I need warm hands when I get to work ! 

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