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10w - 30 or 10w -40

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klrman
6 hours ago, Graham NZ said:

DCT (pre-2016) Reset Procedure

 

NB  Don't touch the throttle during the following procedure. The 2016 and later appear to be different for this.

 

1.     Have engine at normal temperature, check fan is not running, select neutral, switch off using key (NOT the kill switch).

 

2.     Hold gear selector button on D and turn on ignition.

 

3.     Continue to hold D until yellow check engine light (MIL) goes out, then release it.

 

4.     Press selector button in quick succession in the sequence D D N D N

 

5.     In the gear display the D and S will show, and the dash ( - ) should blink at 2 sec intervals. The system is now ready for learning the clutch initialisation.

 

6.     Press the starter and start the engine.

 

7.     Wait for the D & S and the ( - ) to go out.

 

8.     Initialisation is now complete, you can stop the engine and then use it as normal.

That is so helpful. Unfortunately mine is a 2017.

I was suggesting to a dealer yesterday that this was possible.

He looked at me like I had two heads and told me that it needed to be brought in to the dealership and plugged in to the diagnostics.

Dealer v Forum ? No brainer ! 

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embee

The only difference for the later bikes (the ones with three S modes) is that you need to hold the throttle wide open at some point in the process. I will leave it to someone who has access to the relevant workshop manual to quote a definitive process for it. You can still do it yourself.

Note that there are a number of ways the process might fail to complete, but in that case just switch off, leave it for a bit, then start again. It must be at normal operating temperature, and if it's not hot enough the display shows a small or large letter "L" (for low).

 

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edgey999

With thanks to others 

 

Honda DCT Reset for 2016+ NC750X/S:

 

- Get aboard the bike and start the motor. Run up to operating temperature but NOT with the fan running

- With the transmission key in N for neutral, switch-off the ignition to stop the motor.

- With the ignition off, fully OPEN the THROTTLE and press AND HOLD the switch into ‘D’.

- Switch the ignition on but DON’T START THE MOTOR. (Whilst still holding throttle open as well as the D button)

- Wait until you see in the dashboard display the yellow symbol for the motor disappearing, then let go of the D key that you've been pressing.

- Now the tricky bit: as fast as you can, press the sequence:

D D N D N.

- In the dashboard display, BOTH the letters D and S should appear.

CLOSE the THROTTLE

- Turn on the motor, but don’t touch the throttle.

- After a few seconds, the letters D and S extinguish.

- Select “N” and turn off the ignition key. Done.

Edited by edgey999
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Graham NZ

So, the difference for bikes prior to 2016 is to leave the throttle closed and for later bikes to have it wide open.  The later method would require two hands, one to hold the throttle and the other to sequence the mode button.

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Graham NZ
7 hours ago, Graham NZ said:

So, the difference for bikes prior to 2016 is to leave the throttle closed and for later bikes to have it wide open.  The later method would require two hands, one to hold the throttle and the other to sequence the mode button.

 

Actually a bit more awkward than it looks.  Right hand holds the throttle open and operates the D button while the left operates the key.  I'd get a helper to work the throttle and have both hands to do the rest.

 

So much easier on the pre 2016 bikes.

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Stu Brown

Thanks for the clutch reset info.

With new 10 - 30 grade oil  and the reset completed, the whole drive experience is now much smoother.

I am guessing that the Integra had been filled with 10-40 and / or no reset done before I picked it up second hand.

Stu Brown

Matlock

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Iron horse

So thinking of switching to 10w30 from 40 at the next oil change in the 700x manual. But what's everyone's view on going fully synth from semi? 

 

Used Motul 5000 several times and might try 5100. Bit more money, but is it worth it?

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Tex

My view is that semi synthetic is fine for such a low revving and lightly stressed engine, but fully synthetic certainly can’t hurt! It’s what I always use. And anyone who thinks oil is expensive needs to tot up the costs of an engine re-build.. ;) 

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Tonyj

Tex I was under the impression that fully synthetic was better suited to higher reving engines .

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Scooby_NOOB

Is this stuff any good for my 2014 NC750X?
http://amzn.eu/d/5VzhHGo

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SteveThackery
29 minutes ago, Scooby_NOOB said:

Is this stuff any good for my 2014 NC750X?
http://amzn.eu/d/5VzhHGo

 

Isn't your bike supposed to use 10W-30?  I recommend you stick with the grade the manufacturer specifies.

 

Re. synthetics vs. semi-synthetics: the engine will last longer than the rest of the bike regardless of which you use.  If it had a turbo I'd recommend a synthetic, as they are excellent at withstanding the searing heat of the turbo bearings.  Otherwise, it won't make any difference.

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Scooby_NOOB
5 minutes ago, SteveThackery said:

 

Isn't your bike supposed to use 10W-30?  I recommend you stick with the grade the manufacturer specifies.

 

Re. synthetics vs. semi-synthetics: the engine will last longer than the rest of the bike regardless of which you use.  If it had a turbo I'd recommend a synthetic, as they are excellent at withstanding the searing heat of the turbo bearings.  Otherwise, it won't make any difference.

Sorry its late i meant this one:-

http://amzn.eu/d/5cGVKEb

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Tex
7 hours ago, Tonyj said:

Tex I was under the impression that fully synthetic was better suited to higher reving engines .

 

Not exactly. The truth is that fully synthetic will continue to protect such engines after a ‘lesser’ oil has given up. But the way you phrase it suggests that fully synthetic somehow gives less protection to a low reviving unit - and that’s not the case.

:) 

 

 

 

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Tonyj

No genuine enquiry . I was led to think that full synth was created for higher revving engines that run hot , like competition stuff . Think I have been listening to too many bloke down the pub stories . “Has in don’t run it in with fully synth as it don’t bed in.” Quite happy to be corrected. Hence my question. I use fully synth in my dirt bike but still bin it after a few days riding . Cost about £20 with filters and has you say cheaper then a tear down.

 

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Tex
5 minutes ago, Tonyj said:

No genuine enquiry . I was led to think that full synth was created for higher revving engines that run hot , like competition stuff .

 

Well, yes, it’s currently the ‘state of the art’ in lubrication technology and competition engines will always benefit from that more than, say, commuter type engines.

 

And I would definitely use full synthetic in a dirt bike. :) 

 

I don’t pretend to understand the ‘ins and outs’ (it’s a ‘science’ after all, and I am but a labourer) but I have lots of ‘oil stories’ from over the years..

 

A favourite is being called out to a Mondeo with a ‘warning light’ on and ‘engine noises’. As I got close to the location I saw a trail of oil on the road.. I followed it and, on arrival, a quick look underneath showed the sump plug was missing! :( 

 

I debated the best course of action and decided to try and ‘save the day’ rather than just tow it in. I went back to where the oil started and found the plug in the gutter (at this point I began to feel as though Rev Ken’s boss was smiling down on the hapless customer) and de-toured to a local garage and bought a gallon of cheap oil.

 

Plug snugged back in place and the sump topped up with fresh oil I crossed my fingers and turned the key.. it started right up, rattled for a moment or two as the oil pressure built up and the oil got into the extremities and then purred happily enough.

 

Moral of the story (apart from don’t leave your sump plug loose! ;) ) is, I suppose, that an engine will actually run for a short while with no oil in it, relying solely on the oil that’s clinging to the surfaces of bearings etc. 

 

One imagines that the engine in my little story probably had it’s future life jeopardised. Maybe it only lasted 100k miles instead of the 200k that’s normally possible? Who knows? 

 

What’s the best oil to use in your engine? The one that makes you happy!! :niceone:

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DaveM59

I have no proof of this but considering the requirement still to 'run in' bike motors and change the oil at 600 miles my theory is that they factory fit a lesser oil in order to facilitate final 'polishing' of surfaces. Having just changed the oil in the Forza at 750 miles the stuff that came out was as thin as tap water and really had no 'oiliness' if you get my drift.

This is why I always think that during the running in period you should not be too gentle as once this oil is out and a decent semi or fully synth is fitted the wear, or rather the 'bedding in' if not complete will no longer take place.

As for what oil you fit after run in is almost irrelevant as long as it's suitable for a wet clutch. For a scooter or CVT any oil will do, car or bike, but still best to avoid any with 'extra' additives above the normal as these can cause issues when motors use 'plastic' gears anywhere.

Edited by DaveM59
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ManosCR
On 10/7/2018 at 15:51, motorbykcourier said:

OK, here's my ten pence worth…..

I changed to 10w-40 after around 60K miles - main reasons were to see if it would quieten the clutch rattle and improve gear selection.

Been using it ever since and yes it did quieten down the engine, clutch and improve gear selection, nothing seems to have suffered - quite the opposite in fact, having now done 200K miles.

You need to remember I seldom take the bike out and do less that 150-200miles at a time.

Also at the start of a day I'm (normally) quite careful of speed and revs for the first few miles (5-6 miles), before 'relaxing' a bit.

FYI - we'll be covering deliveries tomorrow (Monday) from Cardiff and London.

 

200k is a really impressive number! Do you use synthetic or semi-synthetic oils ?.. and change them regularly at 8000 miles?

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Graham NZ

I am using 10w-40 semi synthetic and I can't detect any difference in feel or DCT operation.  My bike hardly ever goes less than 50km once started and often 250 to 350km during a ride-day.

 

The other fluid, petrol, gets used at the rate of 29 to 31km/l and when the low fuel light comes on it takes exactly 10 litres to refill with the bike on the centrestand.

 

So far my NC has been an easy and economical bike to run once a few issues caused by it's first owner were sorted.

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Andy m

Oooh an oil thread 😕

 

I take the view that I will never keep a bike for the 100000 miles modern engines will do. I have seen data that says most bike oil is not even close to the service limit when analysed, we could double our service intervals in most cases. The world outside Europe, Australasia and North America has no concept of anything except the basic grades and the difference between wet clutch and dry. They work their bikes in harsh climates and not much changes, they just work until small, usually electrical items give hassle then they mend them. I have used stuff in Turkey that was labelled "tractor oil" and while I changed it when I got home it did no harm. 

 

Basic 10W40 for me then, change it at the manufacturers interval and monitor the level. For a DCT if they said 10W30 that's what I'd use in the same way I put gear oil in gearboxes etc. 

 

Given oil is a commodity product, you have to expect marketing BS. I wonder if Mumsnet debate New Improved Persil over Aldi? Does anyone really believe there is a difference? 

 

Andy

Edited by Andy m
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skorpion

My last bike ZZR600 the gearbox would get a bit sticky/slightly reluctant to change gear when the engine was hot, I was recommended to try Motul 7100 full synthetic which I did, this cured the problem.

So I also now use it in the 750X   its the ease of gearbox use that works for me.

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ManosCR
5 hours ago, skorpion said:

So I also now use it in the 750X   its the ease of gearbox use that works for me.

I have the same "problem" in the gearbox (non DCT version). It's noisy when I put the first gear, also sometimes from first to second. The liquidity of the 7100 is 10w-30 or 10w-40 ? Was the difference in the gearbox big enough ?

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skorpion
10 minutes ago, ManosCR said:

I have the same "problem" in the gearbox (non DCT version). It's noisy when I put the first gear, also sometimes from first to second. The liquidity of the 7100 is 10w-30 or 10w-40 ? Was the difference in the gearbox big enough ?

 

I use Motul 7100 10w30 it's not the clunk as you engage first gear it stops, its the slickness/ease of gear changing when you have a hot engine, though my engine also seems quieter. 

In Greece in summer I think I would try the 10w40.

Edited by skorpion

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shiggsy

Probably should have had with 10w-40 in the bike for the 2018 summer...

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Iron horse

I have just changed from not 5000 10w40 to 5100 10w30. Hard to tell for sure, but I think the gearbox isnt as smooth. Not sure whether that is the 5000 to 5100 change or the oil weight?

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motorbykcourier
On 12/01/2019 at 19:22, ManosCR said:

200k is a really impressive number! Do you use synthetic or semi-synthetic oils ?.. and change them regularly at 8000 miles?

 

8000 miles on the dot - or very close and fully synthetic - Castrol Racing 10W40

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