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makman

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makman

Well, I am going to attempt to service my forks tomorrow and refresh the oil.

 

Was thinking of doing it today, but did not have the 17mm hex for the front wheel to come off... silly me, forgot that!  Amazon to the rescue!

 

Have got 2 litres of Silkolene Maintenance 7,5W Fork oil.

 

Got the airgap lined up at 140mm.  Apparently the standard is 104mm.  So just a case of moving that 4 then, but probably more complicated than that!

 

I've draining pots and all the bits I need and even some hammerite paint for the bracket under the mudguard.

 

Watched a few videos and all that on changing the oil, so I will give an update tomorrow!

Edited by makman
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Dunnster
7 minutes ago, makman said:

Well, I am going to attempt to service my forks tomorrow and refresh the oil.

 

Was thinking of doing it today, but did not have the 17mm hex for the front wheel to come off... silly me, forgot that!  Amazon to the rescue!

 

Have got 2 litres of Silkolene Maintenance 7,5W Fork oil.

 

Got the airgap lined up at 140mm.  Apparently the standard is 104mm.  So just a case of moving that 4 then, but probably more complicated than that!

 

I've draining pots and all the bits I need and even some hammerite paint for the bracket under the mudguard.

 

Watched a few videos and all that on changing the oil, so I will give an update tomorrow!

 

It's very straight forward, just take a methodical and patient approach. I went to start the job but had to wait as I had to order a hex bit too!:D

You might only need one litre, it's just over 500ml in each fork leg. 

2012 700x takes 514ml per leg plus/minus 2ml.

I poured in 500 and something ml then sucked out oil until I had 104mm air gap. I used a syringe with a bit of tubing on the end which measures 104mm to the syringe shoulder. Rest the syringe on top of the fork leg and pull up oil until just air is being sucked in means I have the correct air gap. 

Take your time and you'll be fine, job'll be a good un. :thumbsup:

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makman

It is raining rather hard at the moment, so it looks like this will only happen tomorrow now.... poop.  Or possibly next weekend if things don't go to plan with the weather.

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rjp996

Sniff the oil that comes out - surprisingly stinky....

I had to get a low profile hex socket (machine mart) to easily do uo and torque the top clamp

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Iron horse

Anyone here experienced how much better the forks feel after an oil change?

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Dunnster

Yes. Superb (however don't expect magic carpet ride expectations), so much so I'm going to change mine every 2 years. 

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makman

Amazon sent me an empty envelope. Yes, no hex supplied... so I've gone for a re-delivery.  BUT, it is not showing as dispatched.  So I may cancel order and see if I can find something reasonably local to use.... Annoying,  but it is very cold outside and I don't feel like going out.  I am mid terrace, so all work is done on the pavement! Brrrrr.

 

Had the fork oil and seals on my CBF500 done by a friend, and it did make a good difference. And yes, the old oil stank!!  Same again for the Sprint RS.  It does make things smoother and more compliant.

 

I'll look at Machine Mart for a low profile socket.

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Iron horse
57 minutes ago, makman said:

Amazon sent me an empty envelope. Yes, no hex supplied... so I've gone for a re-delivery.  BUT, it is not showing as dispatched.  So I may cancel order and see if I can find something reasonably local to use.... Annoying,  but it is very cold outside and I don't feel like going out.  I am mid terrace, so all work is done on the pavement! Brrrrr.

 

Had the fork oil and seals on my CBF500 done by a friend, and it did make a good difference. And yes, the old oil stank!!  Same again for the Sprint RS.  It does make things smoother and more compliant.

 

I'll look at Machine Mart for a low profile socket.

M8 nuts and bolt will do the job from Wickes/B&Q or similar. Lock two nuts together on the bolt and you just get enough torque to undo it. Not great but it will do the job

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deecat

Hi Phil M8 nuts are to small it is M10 that you need for the NC 

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makman

Hmmm.  1 Bolt, 2 Nuts. Frankenstein bike... 

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makman

Borrowed the 17mm Hex off a neighbour who has several bikes, road and off road.  

 

Fork oil done. Stinky old stuff....  Much firmer and smoother.

 

Rear shock done.  That was a doddle. No need to take off panels. Just patience and the right size bits.

 

The bolts were spotless, as it totally clean.  Lovely.  Light touch of grease to slide them back in and job done.

 

Bike is more supple on the road now and does is more comfortable.  So I am happy with the overall changes.

 

Wife is back tonight, so I must clear away all my tools and "bike crap"!!  Phew!

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neojynx

Mine need doing, but fork seals as well so probably do it next weekend.  I'm glad they are firmer, as my only criticism of the bike is the front forks are shit.

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makman

Just watch out for the washer under the spacer....  it disappeared into the soup of old oil in the tray.  I retrieved them after draining oil into container for recycling at the local council recycling centre.

 

Really chuffed though. The rear shock I knew would be simple enough, but this is my first go at doing the forks and I'll definitely do them again myself.  Really is a simple enough job.

 

I recommend giving it a go. Just make sure you have the 17mm hex for the front wheel nut!    

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Iron horse

What did you do to the rear shock?

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makman
7 minutes ago, Iron horse said:

What did you do to the rear shock?

 

Swapped it out for a Wilbers basic shock.  Managed to get it from that auction place for £254 instead of over £300. It is currently on at £285.

 

Very pleased with the Wilbers. I did lather it in ACF50 before fitted it and am well pleased with the quality and the ride.  I will scrub down the old shock and keep it to fit it back to the bike if I sell it a I will sell the Wilbers on separately. 

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klrman

Well done that man ! You've inspired me. I'm going to install a lighter fork oil grade.

You give a new perspective to "The Pavement Society"

But I'll be doing mine in the garage, door down, bike up on the lift and as far as is possible sat down.

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Coval
2 hours ago, klrman said:

Well done that man ! You've inspired me. I'm going to install a lighter fork oil grade.

You give a new perspective to "The Pavement Society"

But I'll be doing mine in the garage, door down, bike up on the lift and as far as is possible sat down.

Talking from experience, lower grade oil will give you less compression damping but also less rebound. My advice is, stick to 7.5 Silkolene RSF Maintain.

There is not much you can do to improve things up front unless you are prepared to spend lads on fork cartridges etc.

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klrman
Just now, Coval said:

Talking from experience, lower grade oil will give you less compression damping but also less rebound. My advice is, stick to 7.5 Silkolene RSF Maintain.

There is not much you can do to improve things up front unless you are prepared to spend lads on fork cartridges etc.

I have to confess to not being conversant with the technical merits of lighter oil in the NC, but I've taken my cue from a similar thread a couple of weeks back where  a number of forum members were advocating a lighter oil as beneficial, and a cheaper, though less effective alternative to cartridge mods.

I'm confused now. Don't feel bad, it doesn't take much

 

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skorpion
20 minutes ago, Coval said:

Talking from experience, lower grade oil will give you less compression damping but also less rebound. My advice is, stick to 7.5 Silkolene RSF Maintain.

There is not much you can do to improve things up front unless you are prepared to spend lads on fork cartridges etc.

 

I would like to say that from my experience of the SDBV forks, you are correct if you refill using Honda's recommended air gap,

But using the Wilbers recommended air gap you have no excessive rebound or dive.  

Edited by skorpion

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embee

Fork oil change is about the cheapest mod you can try. If you don't like the effect, try something else. Comparison table here http://peterverdone.com/wiki/?title=Suspension_Fluid

You must compare the actual viscosities and VI of the actual oils you're considering, the label grade is only a guide.

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skorpion
15 minutes ago, embee said:

Fork oil change is about the cheapest mod you can try. If you don't like the effect, try something else. Comparison table here http://peterverdone.com/wiki/?title=Suspension_Fluid

You must compare the actual viscosities and VI of the actual oils you're considering, the label grade is only a guide.

 

You got me right Cheap, or as some say Tight,  when I was experimenting with fork oils on my bike I kept to the same oil type Silkolene Maintenance Fork oil.

I'm now using 5wt though I may try 2.5wt after the winter, I was thinking that I would find a soft spongy feeling to the fork action, but no, only a less jarring ride, this I put down to the Wilbers air gap setting as when I first used Honda's setting with the 7.5wt oil I found excessive dive under heavy braking, but this was the only problem I found.

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Spindizzy

Reading this with interest. Can someone clarify for me. Is it suggested that the level of oil returned to the Honda Forks be different to published OEM amounts? 

 

IE with a 140mm gap over 104mm thats less oil than standard?I haven't checked the manual, but is that measured from the top of the fescalized portion to the oil without the washer/spacer/spring being in place?

 

Just curious, not questioning the method. 

 

 

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embee

Oil levels are quoted from the top of the stanchion (the fescalised portion, as you put it) with the spring/spacer/washer removed and the fork fully compressed, and upright.

Yes, 140mm means less oil than 104mm.

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poldark

Is there any suggestion that the numbers have been transposed in error and correct setting is 140mm and it's a production error??

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Spindizzy
5 minutes ago, embee said:

Oil levels are quoted from the top of the stanchion (the fescalised portion, as you put it) with the spring/spacer/washer removed and the fork fully compressed, and upright.

Yes, 140mm means less oil than 104mm.

With less oil there is more compressible air, so you get more travel which would reduce the sudden shocks especially with thinner oil,  albeit give less damping at the top end.I guess if it doesn't bounce its ok.Might dive a little more under heavy braking at least initially.

 

My knowledge is limited to aircraft oleos, which in effect are the same as motorcycle forks but use only air and oil, no springs. Plus the oil levels are fixed by servicing method.

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