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wendeg

Overloading?

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wendeg

I am in the process of ordering these set of driving lights with a total of 40W (2 x 20W)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lampa-90460-Max-Lum-Auxiliary-Headlights/dp/B01M8FE6YC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1542736311&sr=8-1&keywords=lum+max+1

 

I will be powering the above via the accessory harness through which I already have powered a Garmin gps (with a 2A fuse) and a Scottoiler (with a 1A fuse). Do you think that I am overloading the  accessory harness or that the power I will be drawing from the stator is too much?

 

thanks for your thoughts!

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hirsute1956

Dunno about the overloading but they look very smart.

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Deltabi

The NC alternator has not much power available, if I remember correctly its about 120 watts (i.e. around 10 amperes). So if those are the only electrical accessories you are ok.

However I would not connect aux lights on the accessory socket, I would connect them to the battery using a relay and then use the accessory socket to power the relay that provides current to the lights. This is what I did with a similar aux light.

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pjm

I would look on banggood at their led lights. Had them on my AT and fine for about £20.

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wendeg
15 minutes ago, Deltabi said:

However I would not connect aux lights on the accessory socket, I would connect them to the battery using a relay and then use the accessory socket to power the relay that provides current to the lights.

 

Thanks for your reply. Why is it not recommended to connect them to acc harness? I presumed it would be fine since the Honda ones are connected to the accessory socket.

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Deltabi
26 minutes ago, wendeg said:

 

Thanks for your reply. Why is it not recommended to connect them to acc harness? I presumed it would be fine since the Honda ones are connected to the accessory socket.

Because load capacity (ampere) on those cabling is usually pretty limited (a few amperes) and I would not use it fully in order to allow the connections of other accessories in the future.

Moreover, from an electrical point of view, it is good habit to separate "load" (the lights) and "command" (the switch) circuits.

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embee

According to the NC700 manual, the max alternator output is 420W (that'll be around 5000rpm or so). I think that's a manual version, the DCT is slightly higher, but essentially the same order of magnitude.

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ste7ios

Garmin is about 1.6A, Scottoiler about 0.8A. 40W are 2.77A at 14.4V. You have a total of 5.17A. Also the Scottoiler doesn’t use always 800mA but only the moments that its pump is working.

 

The accessories’ subharness can support totally about 6A.

 

You may safety use it...

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wendeg
27 minutes ago, ste7ios said:

Garmin is about 1.6A, Scottoiler about 0.8A. 40W are 2.77A at 14.4V. You have a total of 5.17A. Also the Scottoiler doesn’t use always 800mA but only the moments that its pump is working.

 

The accessories’ subharness can support totally about 6A.

 

You may safety use it...

I will use the subharness for these accessories. Will put a 3A inline fuse for the auxiliary lights... this should be enough no?

 

The fuse offered by Honda with the relay is 7.5A. Is there any reason why subharness will support less than 7.5A. Is there any mathematical reason for not using up to 7.5A?

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Deltabi
1 hour ago, embee said:

According to the NC700 manual, the max alternator output is 420W (that'll be around 5000rpm or so). I think that's a manual version, the DCT is slightly higher, but essentially the same order of magnitude.

 

To this number you must detract the energy used by the bike itself: lights, instruments, pumps, actuator, etc. If I recall correctly I read that around 120 watts is what remains available.

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Deltabi
7 minutes ago, wendeg said:

I will use the subharness for these accessories. Will put a 3A inline fuse for the auxiliary lights... this should be enough no?

The fuse offered by Honda with the relay is 7.5A. Is there any reason why subharness will support less than 7.5A. Is there any mathematical reason for not using up to 7.5A?

 

Fuse are put as a safety measure and usually have values slightly larger than designed current usage. If you plan to use up all available amperes, be ready to spend your time replacing fuses. Your choice.

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wendeg
1 minute ago, Deltabi said:

 

Fuse are put as a safety measure and usually have values slightly larger than designed current usage. If you plan to use up all available amperes, be ready to spend your time replacing fuses. Your choice.

No, I am not planning to use all amperes. Will using up a total of 5.5A be safe?

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Deltabi
1 minute ago, wendeg said:

No, I am not planning to use all amperes. Will using up a total of 5.5A be safe?

 

I think you will be safe. Not wise, but safe. ;-)

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ste7ios
42 minutes ago, wendeg said:

I will use the subharness for these accessories. Will put a 3A inline fuse for the auxiliary lights... this should be enough no?

 

The fuse offered by Honda with the relay is 7.5A. Is there any reason why subharness will support less than 7.5A. Is there any mathematical reason for not using up to 7.5A?

You need a 3.5A quick fuse.

 

The 7.5A fuse means that it will break at that amperage. For that fuse (and the rest parts) the max load is 6A (DC) current (amperage + 125%).

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embee

A 3.5A fuse will be pretty much on the limit for 40W, chances are it may well blow at some point. The fuse is there to protect the wiring, not the appliance. Use heavier gauge wiring and a bigger fuse.

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wendeg
12 hours ago, Deltabi said:

The NC alternator has not much power available, if I remember correctly its about 120 watts (i.e. around 10 amperes). So if those are the only electrical accessories you are ok.

However I would not connect aux lights on the accessory socket, I would connect them to the battery using a relay and then use the accessory socket to power the relay that provides current to the lights. This is what I did with a similar aux light.

😉I think you are on the way of convincing me in powering them from the battery through a relay. I will be putting a handlebar switch but also want this switch to be deactivated when ignition is off. What are the schematics of such a set up? What relay do i need? Thanks!

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Deltabi
1 hour ago, wendeg said:

😉I think you are on the way of convincing me in powering them from the battery through a relay. I will be putting a handlebar switch but also want this switch to be deactivated when ignition is off. What are the schematics of such a set up? What relay do i need? Thanks!

 

Good decision... ;-)

This is a schematics you can start from: I've used it on my NC and it worked ;-)  (sorry, it's in italian, I've translated the relevant words). I've highlighted with a blue line the part you are interested in.

Briefly: you power the switch from the option connector, the lights will be powered directly from the battery through the relay which will be commanded by the switch. Always put fuses on VE+ wirings. The relay can be a standard automotive relay (smallest are 30 amperes, that's fine). 

5e0ee4520f.jpeg

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