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Ciaran1602

Help! Stop the rust

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Ciaran1602

Some of you may know my poor little Haru sits outside all year, covered mostly when I remember to do it. I don’t have anywhere that’s even vaguely covered up that it’ll fit nor have I anywhere to air the cover when it gets wet so I’m normally reluctant to use it. 

 

Ive just spotted the very very earliest signs of surface rust on the front forks. Only a little patch no bigger than a cm in diameter halfway down the chrome. I’ve never had a bike that was in pristine nick when I got it prior to this one and now I’m rather perturbed it’s getting shabby. Plus I don’t want it to affect resale too much. 

 

What can can I do to rescue the situation? Is it really as simple as dousing the thing in ACF50 and praying? If so what parts should I avoid or look out for?

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Andy m

The bits that are going need stopping. Rub down and paint or clean off and treat according to the alloy, pictures to ID the material would help decide. If you can't go that far smear with vaseline until summer. 

 

ACF you need to avoid the brakes as its a pretty effective high temperature lubricant and the tyres because it also reduces the life of rubber. It is great sprayed with a compressor but before I had that I applied with a cloth and it worked well enough, you just missed bits. 

 

Fasteners for cosmetic stuff you can replace with stainless, just copperslip them as you fit. 

 

Andy

 

 

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Radarman

Hi Ciaran,

Although never had the bike that was parked outside but I would definitely recommend trying ACF50. I myself had treated my all bikes with ACF at least twice a year and never had problem with rust (even when I was commuting daily on my NC all year round).

Therefore give the bike a good clean first and let it dry. Then spray it with ACF50 (they come with pump spray bottles) avoiding tyres, brakes and seat. Anything else can be sprayed and rubbed with soft cotton cloth. Other than protection the bike will look nicer and shiner (almost like new) when covered with ACF.

Give me a shout if you need help as it is a bit time consuming job to reach all nooks and crannies.

 

Edited by Radarman
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Tex

Ciaran, get the rust off those forks ASAP. A normal chrome polish will do it. Once the chrome has deep rust ‘pitting’ it will tear the fork seals, creating oil leaks and MOT failure.. :( 

 

Take Hubert up on his kind offer of assistance. Properly ‘winterising’ a bike is well worth the effort and much easier with someone experienced to show you the way. Allow at least a couple of hours, but it’s definitely time we’ll spent. 

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riders in the storm

I buy the 1 litre bottles of ACF 50 usually and chuck the "free" little pump bottle thingy away as I find it to be useless. To do the motorhome I decant the fluid into a garden rose spray thingy (hozelock are best) and then warm it in a bowl of very hot water to help it flow & spray better.....

 

But I would have guessed a simple aerosol can of ACF50 would be sufficient to do an entire motorbike easily....?

Edited by riders in the storm

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ste7ios

For years...

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Spindizzy

Even my 2018 new NC750S has early signs of corrosion spots on the fescalised portion of the forks.

 

Its stored in a garage and never goes out in the wet, until today. Got caught in a few downpours going through Farnham. When I got home thought I should wipe those bits down and noticed it then. Put some ACF on until I can get some chrome polish and make a more thorough job.

 

 

 

 

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Natlas

I had to look up 'fescalised' and the results were interesting, one technical and one - well, decide for yourself........:blink:

1.  Technical term relating to the plated and machined portion (eg of forks) which the seals run on.

2. "Its not in the English dictionary as it comes from the Greek word fescalise which basically means 'without cheese'. Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta (or Phillidelphia light) before being eaten".

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fred_jb
2 minutes ago, Natlas said:

I had to look up 'fescalised' and the results were interesting, one technical and one - well, decide for yourself........:blink:

1.  Technical term relating to the plated and machined portion (eg of forks) which the seals run on.

2. "Its not in the English dictionary as it comes from the Greek word fescalise which basically means 'without cheese'. Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta (or Phillidelphia light) before being eaten".

 

Number 2 sounds like something off "Would I Lie to You" - my vote is for it being a fabrication!  Or I suppose it could be something from the the bush tucker trial on I'm a Celebrity".  (Disclaimer - I don't watch either program, but I know people who do!)

 

 

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Andy m

Ffs don't Google "penis dipped in cheese". I bet not many recipes come up. 

 

Now what I'd love to believe is that the bloke who named the machined plating process knew his Greek and was enjoying listening to his boss telling everyone what to do with goats bits and cheese 😂

 

Andy

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Spindizzy
2 minutes ago, Andy m said:

Ffs don't Google "penis dipped in cheese". I bet not many recipes come up. 

 

Now what I'd love to believe is that the bloke who named the machined plating process knew his Greek and was enjoying listening to his boss telling everyone what to do with goats bits and cheese 😂

 

Andy

Is Fred suggesting I dip my bikes forks in Philadelphia? 

 

Ciaran, if you decide this has merit would suggest a baked Camembert. the coverage will be much better.

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neojynx
2 hours ago, riders in the storm said:

But I would have guessed a simple aerosol can of ACF50 would be sufficient to do an entire motorbike easily....?

In winter, I wash my bike every weekend and then dry it by hand and finish with ACF50. A single can lasts about 8 washes.   Use it sparingly but make sure everywhere is covered, do so by spraying and the using a cloth to rub into the crannies.  

 

Do everything except brake pads and disks, but calipers are fine, stand, all metal, exhaust, plastics even the seat and screen.  Then buff it up with a dry cloth.  It will put an awesome shine on the bike and protect.

 

I ride all winter and am on 34000 miles.  NO rust anywhere (yet).  Get on top of the rust before it gets on top of the bike.

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DMB
1 hour ago, Natlas said:

I had to look up 'fescalised' and the results were interesting, one technical and one - well, decide for yourself........:blink:

1.  Technical term relating to the plated and machined portion (eg of forks) which the seals run on.

2. "Its not in the English dictionary as it comes from the Greek word fescalise which basically means 'without cheese'. Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta (or Phillidelphia light) before being eaten".

 

Couple of quick questions, if you don't mind.  First, was the penis detached from the goat at the point when it was dipped into the jar of Feta?  Second, if it wasn't, was the goat still alive?

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fred_jb
40 minutes ago, Spindizzy said:

Is Fred suggesting I dip my bikes forks in Philadelphia? 

 

Ciaran, if you decide this has merit would suggest a baked Camembert. the coverage will be much better.

 

 

Nothing to do with me - I was just commenting on it.  Natlas is to blame for enlightening us about this bit of Greek culinary magic!

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Tex
32 minutes ago, DMB said:

 

Couple of quick questions, if you don't mind.  First, was the penis detached from the goat at the point when it was dipped into the jar of Feta?  Second, if it wasn't, was the goat still alive?

 

Christ! Where are you going with this?! 

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Spindizzy
2 hours ago, neojynx said:

In winter, I wash my bike every weekend and then dry it by hand and finish with ACF50. A single can lasts about 8 washes.   Use it sparingly but make sure everywhere is covered, do so by spraying and the using a cloth to rub into the crannies.  

 

Do everything except brake pads and disks, but calipers are fine, stand, all metal, exhaust, plastics even the seat and screen.  Then buff it up with a dry cloth.  It will put an awesome shine on the bike and protect.

 

I ride all winter and am on 34000 miles.  NO rust anywhere (yet).  Get on top of the rust before it gets on top of the bike.

I so wish I could be a***d to do that. If it was my only transport then maybe......the car gets cleaned when its no longer white.

 

I really should do better with the ACF50. I tend to do just the obvious bits and chrome. I guess it is safe to just spray everywhere other than brakes and tyres.

 

 

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Ciaran1602

This must be a new record for thread derailment. 

 

Thanks Hubert, an appreciated offer. I’m flitting about all over the shop well into January with courses and family stuff now so won’t get much of an opportunity but I’ll definitely get treating it. 

 

I didn’t even know there was a way of polishing out rust with a polish. Will get on it. The only place that’s showing any sign of it is the chromed portion of the exhaust (probably about midway between the mudguard and the beginning of the fairing). Might as well stop the decay while I can. 

 

I think im going to have to admit defeat in March time when she’s two years old and seek out a NC750s or a maxi anyway. While I can get on and off it any incline becomes hazardous and lowering it for the price of a deposit on something new seems a bit daft!

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Andy m

The "Chome" on modern bikes isn't. Chromium is a metal that they used to use as a coating because it wouldn't corrode. Trouble is, short of having them lick paint brushes to apply radium to clock faces or machine asbestos , chromium is about the best way going to kill your work force. It's banned. 

 

What we have is mostly silver paint. Paint designed to keep corrosion out is meant for the bottom of boats and oil rigs so doesn't come in pretty colours. The good stuff also requires you to have acid baths and fish traps and lots of other hassle in your factory. Water based silver paint works for show rooms so that's what they use. 

 

What I have done on previous exhausts when lacking garage facilities is to wait for a dry day and cover the rest of the bike in rags and tape and then take a wire brush to the exhaust. Wipe it down with white spirit then cover and wait as long as you dare. Spray heat proof paint (BBQ paint at a push) on, let it go taccy then go for a ride to bake it on. Neatly done the matt black can actually look good. 

 

If you ever own an XT600e you'll discover the header pipes are actually 40% rust flakes, bound together with 60% B&Q BBQ paint. The Yamaha originals were an amazing substance, cardboard that could rust. They no longer make them and every owner has the rattle can at the ready. 

 

Andy

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skorpion

Ciaran1602

 

I thought the exhaust was stainless steel, so no rust only tarnish.:ermm:

Edited by skorpion

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Mr Toad
16 hours ago, Natlas said:

I had to look up 'fescalised' and the results were interesting, one technical and one - well, decide for yourself........:blink:

1.  Technical term relating to the plated and machined portion (eg of forks) which the seals run on.

2. "Its not in the English dictionary as it comes from the Greek word fescalise which basically means 'without cheese'. Greek shepherds used the phrase 'fescalised portion' to describe the 'shaft' of a goat's penis (a delicacy in Greece) which was held held between the thumb and forefinger while the 'helmet portion' was dipped in a jar of Feta (or Phillidelphia light) before being eaten".

 

Thanks for looking it up. It's a word I had never seen or heard before either. 

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Mr Toad
15 hours ago, DMB said:

 

Couple of quick questions, if you don't mind.  First, was the penis detached from the goat at the point when it was dipped into the jar of Feta?  Second, if it wasn't, was the goat still alive?

 

Would it help to spray the goat with ACF50?

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Ciaran1602
1 hour ago, skorpion said:

Ciaran1602

 

I thought the exhaust was stainless steel, so no rust only tarnish.:ermm:

 

Exhaust is fine at the mo, only the forks are showing any particular sign of gremlins. 

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skorpion
9 minutes ago, Ciaran1602 said:

 

Exhaust is fine at the mo, only the forks are showing any particular sign of gremlins. 

 

Re-read your last post.

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horobags

when it comes to anti  corrossion potions  , this video is very helpfull-

 

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Ciaran1602
3 hours ago, skorpion said:

 

Re-read your last post.

Doh!

 

i meant the forks 😂

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