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Woody 99

Dash cam or body/helmet cam?

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Woody 99

I expect to be doing a fair amount of mileage in the coming months with a trip to Italy in June and a trip to the S of France in July. It struck me that some kind of digital record of the trips might be sensible from a security standpoint, especially knowing how the French and Italians drive ūü§™¬†

 

is there a big difference between relying on a dash mounted camera versus a body or helmet cam of some sort? Does it matter? What are the best makes to consider? Do we have any experts around here who can point me in the right direction?

 

thanks.

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Mr Toad

Body and helmet cams tend to be adventure, vlogging, type cameras like the GoPro and have limited battery life. You end up swapping batteries several times a day, I suppose you could run a cable but........  Dash cams on the other hand are hard wired to the bike so have power while ever the bike is running. They also loop record, overwriting old footage when the memory card is full so fit and forget.

 

I have a TomTom Bandit adventure cam it comes with several mounts for cars/bikes/helmet etc., I have it helmet mounted. I'm not sure it even has the option to loop record, I think it stops once the memory card is full. It also only records for 3 to 4 hours on a charge and I only have the one battery as additional batteries are expensive.. It's definitely a device for recording memories rather than security footage.

 

I've been looking at dash cams for the bike today as I have a European trip coming up have been thinking along the same lines as you.

 

I shall watch this thread with interest as known solutions are always better than a leap of faith.

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Andy m
Posted (edited)

I'm on my second Drift. The old one survived 5 years but finally got a soaking in the peaks and is now a bit iffy. 

 

The batteries on all of them are universally ****, the only variation is how big the lies are that the manufacturers tell. The new extended battery is good for 4 hours mixed standby and filming. A 2 year old one under an hour. Battery packs meant for phones are better as they have regulated charging and sell on performance not the fact you can take selfies while skiing. 

 

I went for the Drift again because 

 

1.It's small. To capture scenery you want to look at it, so high and movable is best. Bike mounted gives a low fixed view, good for 30 mph collision recording and the odd shot or your mate taking corners, but not the view across a lake etc. However, a Go Pro mounted telly tubby style on top has a serious effect on comfort. I returned mine. 

 

2. The remote, although undersized and fiddly let's your first edit be live. By not recording in the hotel car park you save battery and memory. 

 

3. Drift have learned from the market and you can use a wire from camera to a phone back up style pack in your jacket pocket. On my 720 this was a field mod involving a Dremel and bathroom sealant, the Ghost has a proper hole in the case and instructions. 

 

4. Drift lenses turn in the body so the mountings have a lot more choices. 

 

This is the sort of film you can make 

 

 

This was edited in Moviemaker and was on the older 720. 

 

These have the loop function but are not as dedicated and cost more as you are buying the other features. 

 

Andy

Edited by Andy m
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listener
Posted (edited)

I've got two Roadhawk bullet cams; the older Ride (720p) and a R+ (1080p).

 

Both were used for basic forensic/evidence filming during commuting. Quality of picture was decent - obviously better on the R+.

At 'new' the batteries lasted about an hour and a half, but that dropped to around one hour after about six months.

During winter (arguably when you need it most) I was lucky to get 10-15 minutes out of the battery.

 

I was intending buying the hard-wire option for the R+ but it appears that DogCam (who actually made the Bullet cams) have gone out of business, and Roadhawk no longer do bike cams.

 

I'm thinking of buying an Innovv K2 or C5.

Edit: I'd prefer a hard-wired cam so that the only limitation of time is the memory card.

 

As for mounting ... it depends on whether you want a stable but fixed view (bike mount - my preference) or a less stable but more dynamic "rider's eye" view (helmet/body mount).

Edited by listener

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Mr Toad
2 hours ago, listener said:

I've got two Roadhawk bullet cams; the older Ride (720p) and a R+ (1080p).

 

Both were used for basic forensic/evidence filming during commuting. Quality of picture was decent - obviously better on the R+.

At 'new' the batteries lasted about an hour and a half, but that dropped to around one hour after about six months.

During winter (arguably when you need it most) I was lucky to get 10-15 minutes out of the battery.

 

I was intending buying the hard-wire option for the R+ but it appears that DogCam (who actually made the Bullet cams) have gone out of business, and Roadhawk no longer do bike cams.

 

I'm thinking of buying an Innovv K2 or C5.

Edit: I'd prefer a hard-wired cam so that the only limitation of time is the memory card.

 

As for mounting ... it depends on whether you want a stable but fixed view (bike mount - my preference) or a less stable but more dynamic "rider's eye" view (helmet/body mount).

 

There's no real limitation on time with a hard wired dash cam as once the card is full it overwrites the old footage which is fine if the recordings are for evidence purposes as the only recording of interest is the last few minutes. 

 

As for mounting I agree with bike mounted as the camera is always forward facing and independent of the rider. No point in having the camera if you're looking over your shoulder or to one side when some idiot pulls out in front of you and all that gets recorded is what the camera sees as you fly through the air rather than what caused it.  

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neojynx
Posted (edited)

I use this type now

 

https://www.that auction site.co.uk/itm/DV688-Motorcycle-Dash-Camera-DVR-Aciton-Sport-Camera-GPS-Logger-64GB-Card-Mini/223266089175?epid=10021549912&hash=item33fbb228d7:g:DiMAAOSw9CVbT3lt

 

I have had several Drift cameras.  Good quality video but they all broke prematurely.  The Innov cameras are very expensive and also have various 'issues' .  The camera I currently have is working well so far.  The software for it is crap though.  Decent software would make it a great rather than good camera.

Edited by neojynx

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temp

Being boring...but please don't mount it on your helmet

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outrunner

I have an SJcam 4000 which is a Gopro copy even down to the fittings. It is mounted on the front of the bike and powered from my extra fuseboard so switches off when the ignition is off. It is only there to monitor traffic in front of me as if I want scenery pictures I will stop and use my Lumix camera for that although I have sometimes taken a screen shot from the video. On a personal note I don,t like helmet mountings for cameras but as I have a Sena intercom on my helmet perhaps I am contradicting myself. :hmm:

 

 

Andy.

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DaveM59

One advantage of a helmet mount is that should the footage be used in evidence, it shows exactly where the rider was looking. A fixed cam shows what the bike would see but not the rider who may have been gawking at a fit blonde across the road rather than where he was going. It is a hazard though in a crash and could more easily get trashed, even the memory card,  so of no use in evidence. A bike mount sensibly placed may survive better and can be hard wired. GoPros work really well and hard wired will record for several hours at acceptable resolution.

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arengle

my advice is for a dash cam, I tend not to attache anything to my helmet, apparently the reason of Michael Schumacher serious damage was a camera attached to his helmet and in the fall the camera pierced the helmet. Price wise a good dashcam has same price as a good helmet cam, maybe cheaper. My advice will be get a dash cam, it records all the time, if you are on a nice road you just download only that part of video, you don't need to bother with "handling" the camera, start recording, stop it etc during the ride, you just do all the downloads at the end of day. the big disadvantage is they are mounted lower on the bike, and they always look straight, with a helmet cam you can turn the head left to get a nice image of the surroundings with the dash no. One good camera is https://innovv.co.uk/product/innovv-c5-motorcycle-camera/

 

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Chriswright03

I think that there was a little more to it than that with Michael Schumacher's accident.  It depends how the camera is fixed and I believe most of the mounts these days will just snap off in contact with the road.  I don't know how much difference there is between a motorcycle helmet and a skiing one but I suspect the motorcycle one to be more robust.  I stand to be corrected.  I doubt that helmet brackets would be made by the various camera companies now if that were the case in this we will sue you World.

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KingJames

Helmet cam = 2 hours max, looks where you look

Dashcam wired in = Continuous based upon loop functionality and sd card size, fixed ahead typically

 

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neojynx

I tried a body cam fixed onto my bike.  That worked pretty well with a 6 hour battery life.  Pity is stopped working, although most cameras I've had seem to pack up too quickly.

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lazlo woodbine
1 hour ago, neojynx said:

I tried a body cam fixed onto my bike.  That worked pretty well with a 6 hour battery life.  Pity is stopped working, although most cameras I've had seem to pack up too quickly.

The force is strong with this one:D

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GerJ
Posted (edited)

Sorry to be a spoilsport, but are you aware that in various countries dash cams (used for exactly the purpose Woody states) are illegal? Austria and Spain are just two examples. It seems that action cams, because these do not record continuously and serve a similar purpose as vacation pictures, are more easily tolerated. Last year there were discussions on this topic on the NL and D BMW GS forums.

Edited by GerJ

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temp
3 hours ago, Chriswright03 said:

I think that there was a little more to it than that with Michael Schumacher's accident.  It depends how the camera is fixed and I believe most of the mounts these days will just snap off in contact with the road.  I don't know how much difference there is between a motorcycle helmet and a skiing one but I suspect the motorcycle one to be more robust.  I stand to be corrected.  I doubt that helmet brackets would be made by the various camera companies now if that were the case in this we will sue you World.

The danger is not so much of penetrating the helmet but the twisting forces that can occur if the camera snags something in a fall. The outer of most safety helmets are smooth so that they will slide. I understand that Michael Schumacher's broken neck resulted from the twisting of his head when his camera caught something in his fall.

When we get on a bike we all make a risk assessment (maybe unconsciously) and wear safety gear and plan to ride within our safety comfort zone. This will be different for everyone: for me, wearing shorts, flipflops or a helmet cam are all too risky for me.  Some on this forum may remember when helmets were not compulsory but when decent helmets were available most riders wore them.

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Chriswright03

I seem to recall your calling of his accident is right but like I said I doubt any manufacturer would market and see a camera bracket that would not break on impact these days due to the laws regarding Corporate Manslaughter let alone the risk of being sued.  It was quite a few years ago when he had his accident and it was probably connected to the helmet with a bit of angle iron in those days.

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temp
4 minutes ago, Chriswright03 said:

I seem to recall your calling of his accident is right but like I said I doubt any manufacturer would market and see a camera bracket that would not break on impact these days due to the laws regarding Corporate Manslaughter let alone the risk of being sued.  It was quite a few years ago when he had his accident and it was probably connected to the helmet with a bit of angle iron in those days.

I have a retired helmet with a mount that is still sold today. It would need a chisel and hammer to remove it, and I don't want that degree of force applied to my neck.

As far as I know helmet cams are banned  at track days now for safety reasons. But, as I said, make your own risk assessment but I would advise doing some research before modifying a safety item.

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