Jump to content
Integrator

BoosterPlug experience..?

Recommended Posts

SteveThackery
6 hours ago, neil700 said:

I went the conventional route and stuck on an Akropovic exhaust and a DNA air filter . Fuel consumption seemed to improve and the performance even more so. Not a cheap option but made my NC way more flexible especially in 6th. Completely happy

 

No dyno curve = didn't happen.  :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Trev
1 hour ago, embee said:

All of the above.

 

OK, so the Boosterplug is as Andy says a tweak to the air temperature signal. How the engine reacts to this depends a lot on how the calibration and algorithms work in the ECU. If as they claim it results in typically a 3% base enrichment, the effect it will have at low speed/light load will depend on how the lean-going and rich-going ramps in the feedback operate. Very often when the correction in the feedback reverses (the ECU senses the change in voltage from the lambda/O2 sensor) there is a step plus a ramp, so if for example it is on the rich side it will step down the fuelling by a fixed amount then ramp down further until it reaches the lean side reversal point. The steps and ramps can be different in each direction, and can be altered by various other factors (speed/load etc). Adding essentially 3% fuel to what the ECU is calibrated for will mean it will be running in the lean-going phase more of the time, so may behave a bit differently.

If the calibrations and transient features result in excessive lean excursions it can make it feel a bit unresponsive. Transients can be tricky to get right, it involves "predicting" when the air gets to the cylinder and trying to deliver fuel at the right time, and this depends on speed/load and how the load is "measured" (speed/density/throttle angle/rate of change etc). There is a delay between opening the throttle and the engine cycle getting more air, and you don't want to put fuel in when the air hasn't yet got to the cylinders but you don't want it to be too late otherwise you can get a misfire/hesitation etc.

Now, this may be the case for the original calibration for emission compliance reasons, rich excursions on transients invariably result in very big HC/CO spikes so tend to be avoided. Lean excursions will, as Steve says, result in NOx spikes but at low speed/light load the absolute values of NOx mass emissions are low so that may not be a big issue for compliance/certification.

The first thing to do is make sure your engine is actually running at its optimum. Check valve clearances, renew the plugs if they are beyond 50k kms. Run it on some "super" 97/98RON fuel for a couple of tanks (helps clean any deposits from injectors) or use some proprietary injector cleaner in the recommended dosage (it can help with small deposit loading). Use an original air filter.

If it's a DCT then do a clutch initialisation, it's free and will determine how well the take up works away from standstill so significant for feel.

 

If all the above fail to get it working to your satisfaction, then by all means try an aftermarket add-on, but get it working at its best first.

 

I find my 700 Integra runs absolutely fine on std filters/exhaust etc, but you may find different.

 

Reading through that it seems a little bit complicated which, I guess, is why the Guzzi engineers never bothered on the V7. It just felt feeble and hesitant when a low tune, 750  twin shouldn't have, the 45 year old carb fed XS motor feels so much better in comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
SteveThackery
2 hours ago, Trev said:

Reading through that it seems a little bit complicated which, I guess, is why the Guzzi engineers never bothered on the V7. It just felt feeble and hesitant when a low tune, 750  twin shouldn't have, the 45 year old carb fed XS motor feels so much better in comparison.

 

It's not that complicated, really.  Once you've got your head around the concept of the closed feedback loop, you've got 90% of it.  The rest - the steps and ramps - are really just fine tuning to get the very best combination of performance, responsiveness and emissions.

 

Of course, the 45 year old carb fed XS motor didn't have to comply with any emission regs, so it had it easy.   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Trev
13 minutes ago, SteveThackery said:

Of course, the 45 year old carb fed XS motor didn't have to comply with any emission regs, so it had it easy.   :)

 

Have to say that standing behind it warming up on the chokes then the smell of fumes did give a little twinge of 'green guilt' before I reminded myself that it's more environmentally friendly (or less environmentally damaging to use the correct description) running an old model than buying a new one, no matter how much cleaner the emissions are - and that's before you include the marketing carbon footprint taken up in persuading us we need shiny new thing or our lives aren't complete :whistle:

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×