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Scootabout

'Slight' puncture

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Scootabout

I pulled a thin bit of wire out of the rear tyre the other day, then did the spit test, and it bubbled a bit. I rode home then checked the tyre a couple of days later, expecting the pressure to be down a fair bit. Hardly any loss of pressure. Could it have sealed itself? Is it safe to continue to ride on it?  It's near the wear limit anyway, but I'm just wondering if I can defer changing it for a bit longer, or whether that might be unsafe. 

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fj_stuart

In Lidl today I saw that they had cans of tyre sealant/inflator. One of these will fix it.   

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Trev
6 minutes ago, Scootabout said:

I pulled a thin bit of wire out of the rear tyre the other day, then did the spit test, and it bubbled a bit. I rode home then checked the tyre a couple of days later, expecting the pressure to be down a fair bit. Hardly any loss of pressure. Could it have sealed itself? Is it safe to continue to ride on it?  It's near the wear limit anyway, but I'm just wondering if I can defer changing it for a bit longer, or whether that might be unsafe. 

 

oooh now you really shouldn't have asked that ...... :frantics::frantics::frantics:

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Tex

My view is it’s fine to use as long as you keep an eye on the pressure. I wouldn’t let it go much under 36 psi, myself. It’s a slow leak in a tubeless tyre, it’s not going to go bang and dump you on your arse. As Stuart says you could put some sealant in there and cure it for good (but your tyre fitter won’t thank you for doing so when he changes it for a new one!).

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DaveM59

It may already have some in, did you fit the tyres?

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Scootabout

I didn't fit them, FWR Tyres did. So no sealant. The weird thing is, I've just checked the tyre again and it has not lost any air at all since I last checked it several days ago. It was at 40 psi. I definitely saw a few bubbles when I did the spit test. However it was a thin piece of wire that caused the puncture, so maybe a tiny hole like that can close up of its own accord?  I think I'll ride on it for a bit and check it regularly, then get it changed fairly soon anyway. 

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Tex

If the leak has gone away then the problem went away with it. :) You don’t get that with an inner tube! :D :dielaugh:

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fj_stuart
2 hours ago, Tex said:

 As Stuart says you could put some sealant in there and cure it for good (but your tyre fitter won’t thank you for doing so when he changes it for a new one!).

 

Yes, it does leave a bit of a mess. I'm my own tyre fitter so not an issue. I've used cans of sealant in wheels with a leak at the rim and they worked fine.

 

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Andy m

Heat revulcanises tyre rubber. It's why a mushroom plug repair gets better over time. When you fit it there is a blob you can feel. Give it 200 miles and you can only see it. Give it 2000 and you'll struggle to find it. 

 

The "temporary repair" blurb is just lawyer speak from people who want to sell you a tyre. 

 

I assume the bit of wire didn't look like tyre carcass wire? 

 

Tubes will do this, enough pressure applied quickly will push the tube against the inside of the tyre. Tends to be very temporary, like the time it takes you to get the luggage back on, or worse, accelerate to 50 mph. 

 

Andy

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Scootabout
8 hours ago, Andy m said:

 

I assume the bit of wire didn't look like tyre carcass wire? 

 

It certainly didn't come from my tyre's carcass, if it did :)  

I don't really know how it managed to get into the tyre. It was a few cm long, and very thin. 

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sandalfarm
On 08/10/2019 at 10:06, Tex said:

If the leak has gone away then the problem went away with it. :) You don’t get that with an inner tube! :D :dielaugh:

Hurrah you managed to get it in somewhere, isn't a slight puncture a bit like being  a little bit pregnant?

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Tex
1 hour ago, sandalfarm said:

Hurrah you managed to get it in somewhere

 

Well, it was rather handed to me on a plate.. just seemed rude to ignore the opportunity.  :niceone:

 

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baben
On 10/8/2019 at 07:33, Tex said:

My view is it’s fine to use as long as you keep an eye on the pressure. I wouldn’t let it go much under 36 psi, myself. It’s a slow leak in a tubeless tyre, it’s not going to go bang and dump you on your arse. As Stuart says you could put some sealant in there and cure it for good (but your tyre fitter won’t thank you for doing so when he changes it for a new one!).

Tex, is it possible to put that goop stuff into a tubed tyre to prevent unexpected unpleasantness?

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slowboy
20 minutes ago, baben said:

Tex, is it possible to put that goop stuff into a tubed tyre to prevent unexpected unpleasantness?

 

Yes it is and it works up to a point (nails, screws etc) without all the unpleasantness come tyre change time. There are a couple of products that work. They are popular with the off-road crowd down here in Devon.

I wouldn't use the Tubliss system on the road, (mechanical system not chemical) as it reportedly doesn't like the heat generated by road use.

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Tex
10 hours ago, baben said:

Tex, is it possible to put that goop stuff into a tubed tyre to prevent unexpected unpleasantness?


Yes. Although I don’t believe it’s going to work as well as it would in a tubeless tyre it’s not going to hurt and may well help. As Brian says the ‘goop’ remains inside the tube not inside the tyre/rim so it doesn’t affect the process when tyre changes come round.

 

You might also consider converting your wheels to tubeless operation? It’s not especially expensive (actually cheap if you DIY) and worth it if you’re planning to keep the bike (Baby, yeah?) long term.

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Andy m

Gloop is a delaying tactic. In my case the nail still in the tyre made lots of holes until they joined up into one too big to seal. 

 

The manufacturers tell lies BTW (I'm supposed to sell the stuff). It can be washed out with water in the sense crude oil will move with boiling water and a shovel, but it will stop any sort of patch or bung working. I've played with our test tyre and the only way to clear it is to wash in petrol then open the hole with a soldering iron. Not so bad if the AA recover you to a place that sells tubes but no good out in the sticks where patches or bungs might save you.

 

Andy

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DaveM59

I think you are missing the point slightly Andy.

The reason to fit Gloop or whatever, is to prevent rapid deflation and potential accident and also to increase the likelihood of being able to make it to a safe place or to the end of your journey under your own power, not after a 2 hr wait for a breakdown trailer in the rain (it always rains). Leaving the nail in there afterwards is your choice and your risk, but the ability to more than likely finish your ride is what it is about.

I use it all the time and change my own tyres and the brand I use (Goop) does wash out fairly easily with tap water and quite well with a squirt of washing up liquid added.

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DaveM59

For tubeless tyres this probably doesn't work or apply. Some brands of gloop state tubeless only, others say they work on tubed as well. A tube will be in a right mess when punctured as the gloop will get between tyre and tubr

Edited by DaveM59
Forgot a bit...

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Andy m

Tube and tubeless is all the same stuff just different packaging. We were told to sell one if the other was out of stock. Possibly the chop size of the bits of old tyre floating in the water and yu-hu glue mix are different but it didn't bother the supplier we had in.

 

If it stops the first puncture, how do you know about the second? The fifteenth is easy to spot, that's where it goes bang and comes off the rim. 

 

Now if you extract the nail, put the gunk in and reinflate you maybe do self recover. If your spoked rim and tube are fitted with a TL tyre it may be the only option so it possibly has a place. I'd rather have a full tubeless set up and mushroom plugs or failing that a full TT set up where I can use irons and fit a new tube (assuming I survive the famed explosive failure that didn't get me the first 93 times).

 

Andy

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