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larryblag

Hmm?

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thwartedEfforts
51 minutes ago, baben said:

Happy memories!

 

:ermm:

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Andy m

I'm lucky, a return trip Southampton - Cape Town when I was 2-3 must have got any seasickness out of my system. 

 

I once did Newcastle Imujiden in the cheapest possible cabin. The outfit was lashed down on deck 3 the cabin was through two water tight doors on deck 1. Not surprisingly there was no port hole. The curve of the bulkhead meant my bunk was almost a double. The bar was on deck 8 and as you can imagine was full of a crowd trying to combine the feel of nights out in the "toon" and Amsterdam. I slept fine, but my mate wasn't happy. 

 

Andy

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larryblag

Used to go deep sea fishing with my Dad from Brid when I was a lad. Sick as a dog during the car journey - right as rain as soon as we were in the boat beyond the bay and into 20ft swell of the North Sea. Ironic. 

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baben

Seasickness is a weird thing. I always succumb in a yacht, after about 12 hours and am then sick for 48. I go through the phases of feeling like I might die to hoping I'll die and  then worried that I won't die then suddenly, back to ok.  I don't really eat much at sea though - guaranteed way to lose weight.

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Tonyj

I am going through a sailing phase at the moment . Not actually sailing just watching you tube : I get sick just watching :0).

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Scootabout
On 10/11/2019 at 12:35, Andy m said:

I'm lucky, a return trip Southampton - Cape Town when I was 2-3 must have got any seasickness out of my system. 

 

I once did Newcastle Imujiden in the cheapest possible cabin. The outfit was lashed down on deck 3 the cabin was through two water tight doors on deck 1. Not surprisingly there was no port hole. The curve of the bulkhead meant my bunk was almost a double. The bar was on deck 8 and as you can imagine was full of a crowd trying to combine the feel of nights out in the "toon" and Amsterdam. I slept fine, but my mate wasn't happy. 

 

Andy

 

Ah the memories. SS Nevasa (converted troop ship) school cruise, 1974. 'E' deck, with the bulkhead curve you mention. 28 of us in a dorm. First morning was a very rough Bay of Biscay. Feeling queasy. Cue a sprint up about 6 flights of stairs to fresh air. Rows of students hanging over the rail with streams of green puke emanating from their mouths, blowing in the breeze. Happy days :ermm:

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sandalfarm

I went on one of those " educational cruises" hated it and was sick the ship was called devonia  it still had plates on the bulkhead  saying no troops beyond this point , it turned out it was the same ship that took my dad to fight in Egypt but then it was called the devonshire

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Mr Toad

If you want a real vomit trip you should take a trip in a C130 Hercules. If you can survive  that without throwing up you good for pretty much anything. 

 

I used to love it :) 

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larryblag

Oops! Posted this in entirely the wrong place (Tenere' 700) but that's my head at the moment. Apologies. I repeat it here.

 

A bit of better news, the doctor thinks the counsellor has it completely wrong and that my memory issues are more a symptom of the depression I'm struggling with. To make sure, she wants to see me and Kels together on Thursday so she can do some memory tests and ask Kelly how I am at home. She is also going to refer me for a neurology appointment which she admits is a bit extreme but that's because the "memory clinic" for dementia isn't available for someone so young (thanks for that Doc ). Though think that particular policy is a bit awry. 

 

Signed off for another month due to my safety-critical role. She has also ruled out any appropriate medication until the results of my tests/checks so as not to distort any results. 

 

Thanks all, for your support, it's been most welcome. It's a difficult thing to talk about despite the very positive media coverage of late which tries very hard to dispel the stigma. 

 

Still no DL650 

 

G

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MikeBike

Garry, I'm sorry to hear of your depression but glad you are getting some medical help. Of course it comes as a surprise as you come across as an extrovert, fun loving, happy comedian type chap. Maybe it is related to 'balance' or cover up. I don't know, sometime that is my way of dealing with feeling down or facing a sad event is to turn to humour.

But what I do know and what I want you to know is that you are among friends who care for you and that you make a big difference and contribution on here. When you were absent for a while the place just wasn't the same and you were missed. You touch our lives and cheer us up with your humour, videos, alternate view of things etc.

Maybe like 'it's a wonderful life' you are depressed but don't realise the positive contribution you make on others.

 

You are much better at sharing than I am, hopefully that helps you realising that others care. Don't disappear again becase we would be worrying.

 

There are lots of people that are in a similarsituation but don't admit it so it may seem like you are the only one when you are not.

 

Personally I find my bike and a special place a great therapy, so when I am feeling down I go out for a ride and short walk to my special spot, admire the beaty of the coast, mountains, forest, wildlife and see the big picture and my problems seem to get put into perspective.

 

Good luck Garry!

 

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Tex

Well said, Mike. Very well said, indeed! :niceone:

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thwartedEfforts
3 hours ago, larryblag said:

It's a difficult thing to talk about despite the very positive media coverage of late which tries very hard to dispel the stigma. 

 

No stigma here. If it helps a good friend of mine found he was having memory issues after a pretty heated divorce. Went for all types of scans and what have you until it was suggested he was suffering from depression. More exercise, better diet, plus simple things like planning to do stuff, planning to not do stuff, all contributed to his full recovery.

 

You might also want to try CBD. It has been something of a marvel.

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listener
On 10/11/2019 at 10:28, baben said:

I rode the vomit thing in the middle of the North Sea.

 

I've been there ...

Over a six year period, I was on a few 21 day survey trips in the North Sea (from StAbb's Head up to beyond Herma Ness, Shetland) doing fish biomass estimates.

I never did get my "sea legs" - I would start to feel ill as soon as we passed the south breakwater of Aberdeen harbour.

 

Oh and we also did some shorter, week long, journeys to find ways of improving the accuracy of the sonar kit.

This was on a small ship with two or three crewmen, one of whom was 'cook'.

On one occasion one of my workmates found a sticking plaster in his soup! :sick: ...:lol:

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listener
51 minutes ago, thwartedEfforts said:

Went for all types of scans and what have you until it was suggested he was suffering from depression.

 

I went through a similar process in late 2008- early 2009.

I was suffering constipation and the docs thought it was a blockage in my digestive system.

After further investigation* it was diagnosed as depression.

 

Just knowing 'what' it was helped - rather than the game of 'guess the disease' my mind was playing.

Getting back on the bike also helped; I'd stayed off the bike because I often felt 'floaty' and was worried I'd pass out.

 

*At the mere mention of "barium enema" my backside wants to pack its bags and disappear to undiscovered lands! :lol:

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MikeBike
1 hour ago, listener said:

I was suffering constipation and the docs thought it was a blockage in my digestive system.

After further investigation* it was diagnosed as depression.

I think the concept of backstop issues being linked to depression is better understood now.

 

I'm really suffering at the moment with anal pain and waiting to go for a colonoscopy. I'm kneeling on the floor to type this as I can't sit down.

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listener
1 hour ago, MikeBike said:

I think the concept of backstop issues being linked to depression is better understood now.

 

I'm really suffering at the moment with anal pain and waiting to go for a colonoscopy. I'm kneeling on the floor to type this as I can't sit down.

 

What complicated matters was that I had just finished a "triple therapy" for Helicobacter pylori. This may have reduced the effectiveness of my digestive tract.

I seem to remember that there's a strong link (vagus nerve?) between the gut and brain. That may have started my decent into depression.

 

I was never in any real pain from constipation but it was very uncomfortable; especially after a visit to the loo.

Having nuclear-grade (I may be exaggerating :whistle:) haemorrhoids probably didn't help! :blink:

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fred_jb
9 hours ago, larryblag said:

Oops! Posted this in entirely the wrong place (Tenere' 700) but that's my head at the moment. Apologies. I repeat it here.

 

A bit of better news, the doctor thinks the counsellor has it completely wrong and that my memory issues are more a symptom of the depression I'm struggling with. To make sure, she wants to see me and Kels together on Thursday so she can do some memory tests and ask Kelly how I am at home. She is also going to refer me for a neurology appointment which she admits is a bit extreme but that's because the "memory clinic" for dementia isn't available for someone so young (thanks for that Doc ). Though think that particular policy is a bit awry. 

 

Signed off for another month due to my safety-critical role. She has also ruled out any appropriate medication until the results of my tests/checks so as not to distort any results. 

 

Thanks all, for your support, it's been most welcome. It's a difficult thing to talk about despite the very positive media coverage of late which tries very hard to dispel the stigma. 

 

Still no DL650 

 

G

 

Maybe you have a mild case of Bipolar Disorder Philip - many clever and amusing people do, for example that fella who does the quiz show, and talking of memory problems, whose name I can't for the life of me recall!  (Just Googled it - Stephen Fry.)  Might explain being so up and down about biking, and the more than average even for this forum, bike turnover!  :D

 

Seems like people can generally be successfully treated for this these days, and problems with memory are among the symptoms listed in the following web page.

https://www.rethink.org/advice-and-information/about-mental-illness/learn-more-about-conditions/bipolar-disorder/

 

Whatever it is I hope you get a diagnosis and the appropriate support, and are soon feeling much better.

 

 

 

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larryblag

Thanks so much everyone for your tremendous support :thumbsup::D

A proper consultation with a very nice, upbeat GP lady yesterday helped no end to be honest. 

It's nice to know I'm appreciated on this forum too - even sans bike. But I knew this of course :flowers:

One day at a time for now, I've had a very positive day today. 

Xxx

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Andy m

I think I'd rather be a bit forgetful than have helicopter pylons and all the stuff Tommy and Mike have!

 

I think stress and forgetfulness is a logical idea. Your brain running riot about whatever you are stressed over, lack or proper sleep etc. simply runs out of capacity. You forget something, so then stress about that as well.

 

Having been close to funny farm with stress and watched colleagues go down with it, the only thing I can suggest is trying to put things in perspective, maybe writing them down, making a plan. This risks being a dire list of what may go wrong, which is where the professionals help you do it right. With work stuff this is rather easier, worst case they sack you and you move on that way. I really dread to think how bad this can be with family or other stuff. 

 

Try what they suggest and it's just another disease they can cure. 

 

Andy

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listener
46 minutes ago, Andy m said:

Having been close to funny farm with stress and watched colleagues go down with it, the only thing I can suggest is trying to put things in perspective, maybe writing them down, making a plan. This risks being a dire list of what may go wrong, which is where the professionals help you do it right.

 

Good idea - although as you say, it can hard to be balanced and not too negative.

 

48 minutes ago, Andy m said:

With work stuff this is rather easier, worst case they sack you and you move on that way.

 

I had over 40 days of sickies, spread over ten months and triggered the work's absences rules.

They made an appointment to see an occupational therapist (I think that was his title) and he certainly helped.

As I said earlier, he convinced me that getting back to doing things I love, specifically biking, would help me.

 

 

One thing I would say is, if you have any medical issues (mental or physical) go see your doctor asap.

Don't be a bloody fool and let the illness/injury take a hold and make things worse.

 

In 2007 my mother ignored her loss of energy (putting it down to flu) for almost two weeks. She then suffered (and survived ... just) a heart attack which weakened her heart and, because she inhaled vomit, her lungs. Even then she continued to put off seeing a doctor when she had any issues. She died in 2017 after a stroke.

My niece likewise ignored stomach pains around five years ago. By the time she did see a doctor, the cervical cancer had spread to a number of other sites. She died this year.

 

 

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listener
23 hours ago, larryblag said:

Thanks so much everyone for your tremendous support :thumbsup::D

 

Here's some more support - only worn once. :lol:

 

$_35.JPG?set_id=2

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Eddie17

 

Dont know how apt this link is but this guy will either make you feel better or do yer head in :):frantics: ...sorry

 

Seriously I think we all underestimate the harm stress can do particularly with a stressful job.

My occupation could be very stressful at times but I was lucky with all the guys round me.

The banter much like on here at times.. You give you take (like the post above lol) but always there for each other.  

 

Just be positive and get out on that bike:) 

 

 

Edited by Eddie17
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SteveThackery

I'll tell you what causes a lot of confusion: we've ended up using the word "depression" for two quite different things:  an emotion, and a mental illness.  

Everybody on the planet will experience depression-the-emotion at various times in their life.  It's the natural reaction to things going wrong, emotional hurt, loss, poverty, injustice, etc.  Unfortunately, lots of people think this is the same thing as depression-the-illness.  

 

I've met many, many well-intentioned people talking about their depression and how they overcame it by various lifestyle changes, or by altering the way they perceive things.  They think they can relate to others with the same thing and help them - a laudable aim.  I think there is something in it - depression-the-emotion can be helped by other people and it's good that they try.  Psychological support and coaching can help change your emotional response to an unpleasant situation so you no longer feel depressed.

 

However, depression-the-emotion is very different from depression-the-disease, and this can be a curse if you suffer from the disease because no amount of well-intentioned coaching, assistance or "positive thinking" can help much, and sometimes your caring friends and family can become frustrated at your lack of engagement with it, or the lack of results.  Indeed, there are plenty of people who take the harder view: that a sufferer should "Snap out of it - I did it, so can you!"  In reality they snapped out of the emotion.  Nobody can snap out of the disease, any more than they can snap out of cancer or diabetes.  Calling the disease "depression" has led to an enormous lack of understanding of its true nature.

I try to differentiate by using the term "clinical depression", but it hasn't really taken hold.  Anyway, that's it - this is my rant about whoever decided to use the same word for the disease and the emotion.  :)

 

Thanks for letting me use up this space with a personal beef!

 

 

Edited by SteveThackery
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ted

Is it time I mentioned train sets yet?

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