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Rocker66

End of the road for RE 500 Single

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Rocker66

I have just read that due to Euro 5 Royal Enfield are ceasing production of their 500 single. Apparently however they are continuing with the 350 probably for the home market. According to the article the Himalayan will continue along with the 650.

Should anyone still want a new 500 they are producing a final batch of special ones.

I can’t guarantee that all the above is 100% as it comes from a Visordown article that appeared on a google card.

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Marvincon

It seems there could be other variations of the 650 in the pipeline, sales of the Interceptor and the Continental have been very good. 

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Andy m

If you want a single you could always try

 

http://www.pricepartmotorcycles.co.uk/page_2219102.html

 

Runs on chip fat (slowly) 😁😁😁😁🤔😁😁😈😁😁

 

Andy

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larryblag
15 hours ago, Andy m said:

If you want a single you could always try

 

http://www.pricepartmotorcycles.co.uk/page_2219102.html

 

Runs on chip fat (slowly) 😁😁😁😁🤔😁😁😈😁😁

 

Andy

Damn good price for all that bespoke work too :thumbsup:

"Kickstart"?? Diesel?? Is that even possible :blink:

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Andy m
2 minutes ago, larryblag said:

 

"Kickstart"?? Diesel?? Is that even possible :blink:

Both the Villiers engine Enfield used and the Yanmar clone the refrofitters use are cement mixer engines with handle or pull cord starting, so manual starting is certainly possible. How practical this is with a quarter turn kicker on a cold morning I think will depend on skill, engine condition and fuel quality. 

 

These engines also have the issue that they don't need electricity to run, so the decompressor is the kill switch as well. Misadjust the lever that holds a valve open and they run until you find a way to kill the fuel supply or stuff something airtight in the intake. 

 

Andy

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slowboy
4 minutes ago, Andy m said:

..These engines also have the issue that they don't need electricity to run, so the decompressor is the kill switch as well. Misadjust the lever that holds a valve open and they run until you find a way to kill the fuel supply or stuff something airtight in the intake. 

 

Andy

 

Exactly what a chap in our vintage bike section found when he'd adjusted his lever before a run out with us "because I like a bit of slack in the cables, it helps the steering".

😁😁😁

 

He's still known as "the great unstoppable"😁

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SteveThackery

I'm in mourning.  It also means I've got to find some money to buy one before they disappear for ever, which wasn't part of the plan.

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Trev
4 minutes ago, SteveThackery said:

I'm in mourning.  It also means I've got to find some money to buy one before they disappear for ever, which wasn't part of the plan.

 

Yup me too, I've been thinking about getting a 'back up' for my 2008 efi for when it goes big time bang (as everyone who has never had an Enfield tells me it will :whistle:) but as it still keeps chugging along (and I've got wayyyy too many bikes already) then I've just not bothered. This is the kick up the backside I need so  will seek out a decent one when I get back from travels and keep it for that Big Bang day ..... if it ever comes.

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Tex
On 22/01/2020 at 20:31, Trev said:

 

Yup me too, I've been thinking about getting a 'back up' for my 2008 efi for when it goes big time bang (as everyone who has never had an Enfield tells me it will :whistle:) but as it still keeps chugging along (and I've got wayyyy too many bikes already) then I've just not bothered. This is the kick up the backside I need so  will seek out a decent one when I get back from travels and keep it for that Big Bang day ..... if it ever comes.


I thought part of the charm of the Enfield was it’s simplicity? You know, being able to rebuild it on the kitchen table with the tools you carry under the seat? That sort of thing.. You could buy a big end bearing, piston assembly, valves and gasket set and put them on a shelf (much cheaper than, yet another, bike.. ;) ).

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kayz1

And a gear set, selectors, bearings:drool:  Just in-case....

I remember buying all the kit people were having trouble with on the 1200gs when they first came online..I went to Russia with a top box full of BMW kit @ around £800..

*883 miles later NOTHING had failed bar a head lamp bulb in Germany..I had one of those GS911 do-da's so i plugged it in to find out if it worked..said your head lamp bulb is dead:lol:

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Trev
52 minutes ago, Tex said:


I thought part of the charm of the Enfield was it’s simplicity? You know, being able to rebuild it on the kitchen table with the tools you carry under the seat? That sort of thing.. You could buy a big end bearing, piston assembly, valves and gasket set and put them on a shelf (much cheaper than, yet another, bike.. ;) ).

 

It took a few more tools than that to fit a new starter sprag clutch (although not many more) which is the only thing of note that's bust so far. It's more that I expect other things will go wrong as miles mount up and I bought it pre-rusted (it was parked up outside next to the sea at Plymouth) and my almost total lack of cleaning regime ain't made it prettier.

 

Besides with everyone on here seemingly buying shiny new bikes every ten minutes surely you don't begrudge me just about the cheapest shiny new thing on two wheels? Besides you know me, it won't be brand new :thumbsup:

 

Can't wait to hear more about your trip btw, have I missed a thread on it?

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Tex
17 minutes ago, Trev said:

 

It took a few more tools than that to fit a new starter sprag clutch (although not many more) which is the only thing of note that's bust so far. It's more that I expect other things will go wrong as miles mount up and I bought it pre-rusted (it was parked up outside next to the sea at Plymouth) and my almost total lack of cleaning regime ain't made it prettier.


I can imagine... :D 

 

17 minutes ago, Trev said:

Besides with everyone on here seemingly buying shiny new bikes every ten minutes surely you don't begrudge me just about the cheapest shiny new thing on two wheels? Besides you know me, it won't be brand new :thumbsup:

 

Matey, I don’t begrudge you anything. :niceone: I actually think it might be rather nice to get a brand new one. You’re still young enough to have it turn into an investment. 
 

17 minutes ago, Trev said:

 

Can't wait to hear more about your trip btw, have I missed a thread on it?

 

No, you haven’t missed a thread. And I suppose I really should try and sort one out. Kind of struggling with the eyes at the moment and too much screen time gives me shocking double vision. But give me a day or so.. :) 

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SteveThackery
On 1/23/2020 at 21:17, kayz1 said:

And a gear set, selectors, bearings:drool:  Just in-case...

 

Actually, the reputation for poor quality and unreliability is undeserved.  Not many people realise that the engine in the Bullet is a modern design, carefully made to look (somewhat) like the original.  

 

My first Bullet, bought in 2004, had what was essentially the English engine of the 1950s, albeit with an electric start and fitted with a more modern ignition system.  It had all the shortcomings of the English engine (overheating exhaust valve, terrible lubrication system, poor durability, delicate and prone to blowing up).  Mine came with written instructions saying it was not suitable for use in modern high speed traffic, being unable to sustain "high" speeds.

 

However, by 2009 AVL had gone in and redesigned the engine, improving it considerably.  Oil pump capacity was doubled, reliability was improved.  Reading University had designed them a new gearbox.  This was the Electra X model and it drove very nicely.

 

My 2014 model is as different again.  This time the engine had had an almost total redesign (even becoming unit construction), with not a single part in common with the earlier models (apart from the piston and conrod, which it shares with the Electra X, I believe).  The bottom end is scoped for 40bhp, so it has an easy time with 28bhp.  The lubrication system has been completely redesigned and now shifts 9 litres per minute at 5000rpm (1.2 litres for the original iron-barrel engine, 2.4 litres for the Electra X).  

 

I've got to say that mine has been totally reliable and appears to be pretty well bullet-proof.  I drive mine at a sustained 75mph with no harm.  The suspension is terrible, though, but that reflects the budget, I think.

Edited by SteveThackery
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tw586

at least the old 500 has a worthy successor in the new 650 twin

 

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Andy m

I had a 2004 5-speed, basically the 1930's engine design with the Cranfield designed separate gearbox instead of the grease filled Albion thing. As Steve says, badly made old technology. There will always be plenty of parts for these because of the number that are modified. Amal carbs and open exhausts and different cam profiles might wring 21HP out of it, but if the 18HP version suffers catastrophic problems before 20000 miles, these changes simply speed that up. 

 

My 2017 EFI only shared the bodywork. It was far from perfect, snapped a chain and had TPS failure, but a totally new level of performance. This will be a different experience in years to come. That chain cannot be a sealed type but is at least the same as for the iron barrels, so India will use thousands of the things for years. The TPS is used on millions of Chinese bikes, but someone needs to ID the part. Something like an engine case or airbox however seemed to change every year as they tweaked it time and time again, so you might end up parts hunting like you would with Italian exotica. How often will you need this basically cosmetic stuff though? 

 

Andy

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SteveThackery
2 hours ago, Andy m said:

It was far from perfect, snapped a chain

 

Yes!  Mine did the same - the OE chain is truly terrible, with loose rivets all over the place.

 

2 hours ago, Andy m said:

That chain cannot be a sealed type but is at least the same as for the iron barrels, so India will use thousands of the things for years. The TPS is used on millions of Chinese bikes, but someone needs to ID the part. Something like an engine case or airbox however seemed to change every year as they tweaked it time and time again, so you might end up parts hunting like you would with Italian exotica. How often will you need this basically cosmetic stuff though? 

 

Hitchcocks have the full stock of parts, but Andy is right - the TPS is not sold separately, you have to buy the complete throttle body.

 

https://www.hitchcocksmotorcycles.com

 

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larryblag

Thanks Steve

Like Andy says we need to "borrow" a known/good TPS and map it's resistance across it and end-to-end. Then "borrow" a best guess pattern part.

Voila! part is ID'd :D

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