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KingJames

The death of the R6

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Trev
17 minutes ago, Andy m said:

The whole "Sportsbikes vs cameras" thing passed them buy and they still think anything under a litre is for girls 😕

 

Andy

 

 

What a blinkered mindset, in reality 988cc is fine :D

 

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Hickky

I suppose I am beginning to (?) show my age when I realise that 100hp is probably more than I need on a bike. I am gladly looking for about one half of that power and adding some lightness for the next Hickkymobile. The small Husky/KTM engine seems about right.

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baben
27 minutes ago, Hickky said:

I suppose I am beginning to (?) show my age when I realise that 100hp is probably more than I need on a bike. I am gladly looking for about one half of that power and adding some lightness for the next Hickkymobile. The small Husky/KTM engine seems about right.

I reckon 70 - 80bhp is all you would ever need and then only if you have to do many motorway miles. It is the one weak spot for the CB500X - it'll do motorway speeds okay but it is not very relaxed and there is not much in reserve.

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Rocker66
6 minutes ago, baben said:

I reckon 70 - 80bhp is all you would ever need and then only if you have to do many motorway miles. It is the one weak spot for the CB500X - it'll do motorway speeds okay but it is not very relaxed and there is not much in reserve.

I find that on the rare occasion we have to use a motorway these days ( we especially try to avoid the so called smart ones) the CB500X will hold 80-85 which means that it’s keeping up with the majority of traffic. I have no desire to do more than that these days. I appreciate that my reflexes are not what they were so for my safety the safety of others and that of my licence 99.9%  of the time I restrict myself to no more than that. That’s another reason I’m not keen on group rides as they can tend to get out of hand. Having said that I enjoyed the last one aI went on which was sensibly led by @PoppetM. The only thing I miss about my Crossrunner is the acceleration not the top end.
Im Sure on reading that certain people will brand me boring but quite honestly I don’t care if that’s what they think. 

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baben

I agree Rocker - it's not so much the speed which as you say, the CB500 can do. It' s the fact that at 80mph there is little in reserve to get out of a sticky situation by a quick twist of the throttle and at 80mph the motor feels very busy.

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Rocker66
19 minutes ago, baben said:

I agree Rocker - it's not so much the speed which as you say, the CB500 can do. It' s the fact that at 80mph there is little in reserve to get out of a sticky situation by a quick twist of the throttle and at 80mph the motor feels very busy.

But then I felt the same with the NC as it was so easy to hit the Rev limiter when going for sudden acceleration.

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Xactly

Well I like having 100bhp; I’d forgotten what real acceleration is like having only ridden my NC750X since the latest lockdown. For me 100bhp is still the ideal. Although I’ve had bikes with more (maximum 130bhp) and ridden some with more still (170bhp) I feel that 100bhp is about the limit before it gets to the point where riding modes and other electronic safety aids become a necessity (I’m talking about my own skill levels here - no doubt many track day addicts can turn it all off with some advantage). Whilst not using the full power all the time (who can, on the road) I do like to give it the berries every now and then, plus at the usual 80-85mph M-way traffic speed it’s useful knowing that there’s instant acceleration with just a twist of the wrist. Overtakes on A and B roads are accomplished a lot more swiftly too. IMHO it’s better to have an excess of power than too little, especially when group riding.

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Rocker66
19 minutes ago, Xactly said:

Guess I better just/keep to NC meets then and not take my little CB500X on their group runs with the big bikes as obviously it would just be a menace. 

Edited by Rocker66

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Trev
33 minutes ago, Xactly said:

Well I like having 100bhp; I’d forgotten what real acceleration is like having only ridden my NC750X since the latest lockdown. For me 100bhp is still the ideal. Although I’ve had bikes with more (maximum 130bhp) and ridden some with more still (170bhp) I feel that 100bhp is about the limit before it gets to the point where riding modes and other electronic safety aids become a necessity (I’m talking about my own skill levels here - no doubt many track day addicts can turn it all off with some advantage). Whilst not using the full power all the time (who can, on the road) I do like to give it the berries every now and then, plus at the usual 80-85mph M-way traffic speed it’s useful knowing that there’s instant acceleration with just a twist of the wrist. Overtakes on A and B roads are accomplished a lot more swiftly too. IMHO it’s better to have an excess of power than too little, especially when group riding.

 

Although I enjoy riding lower powered bikes, if I only had one bike then I'm a bit with you in that I would prefer to have an excess of oomph rather than too little. Have to say though, IMO, group riding is absolutely not a good reason to need an excess of power :cry:

 

I've been Himalayan mounted only for the last few months as not travelled far and not needed to overtake much (for the obvious reason) and although it's been fun in it's own way, I can't wait to get back on the AT or Griso and experience the feeling of actual acceleration again instead of just 'gathering speed' :D Lucky my every day driver is an i3 so I do have some fun every now and then

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Ciaran1602

I don't think in the 9 years since I passed my test (give or take a month or two) I've ever found myself in a situation where a bike genuinely didn't have enough performance to get me out of trouble. More speed may mean more comfortable overtaking and therefore feel safer - but I personally don't feel the need for it. 50-60bhp seems about right for my riding - reasonably proactive though i'll admit I am cautious on the overtake and essentially never exceed indicated 72 on the motorway.

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Trev
15 minutes ago, Ciaran1602 said:

I don't think in the 9 years since I passed my test (give or take a month or two) I've ever found myself in a situation where a bike genuinely didn't have enough performance to get me out of trouble. More speed may mean more comfortable overtaking and therefore feel safer - but I personally don't feel the need for it. 50-60bhp seems about right for my riding - reasonably proactive though i'll admit I am cautious on the overtake and essentially never exceed indicated 72 on the motorway.

 

Each to their own C. and I admire your restraint, never exceeding 72 mph is indeed a rare feat of will power. You really should join me on a back lane potter of the country lanes around my way, I promise we won't exceed 50mph and most of the time won't even get near that :thumbsup: 

 

I do agree about not needing a high powered bike to 'get you out of trouble', as long as a bike will keep up with the traffic speed and conditions it's the brakes, handling, grip and rider experience & skill that keeps you out of trouble, not the ability to wheely away from the fast lane crowd on a motorway :D

Edited by Trev
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Ciaran1602
28 minutes ago, Trev said:

 

Each to their own C. and I admire your restraint, never exceeding 72 mph is indeed a rare feat of will power. You really should join me on a back lane potter of the country lanes around my way, I promise we won't exceed 50mph and most of the time won't even get near that :thumbsup: 

 

I do agree about not needing a high powered bike to 'get you out of trouble', as long as a bike will keep up with the traffic speed and conditions it's the brakes, handling, grip and rider experience & skill that keeps you out of trouble, not the ability to wheely away from the fast lane crowd on a motorway :D

 

Ach, cruise control on the car and wind turbulence on a bike. Both do a good job of keeping the little boy racer that might be tucked away in the depths at bay - though by saying 'essentially never' its impossible to state I've absolutely never got a little carried away. More that I feel no inclination to and don't cruise above the limit as it never seems to make much difference

 

. I would enjoy that and it seems lockdowns are slowly abating. I'll need some help putting some miles on the new one when it comes :devil:

Edited by Ciaran1602
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Trev
21 minutes ago, Ciaran1602 said:

 

. I would enjoy that and it seems lockdowns are slowly abating. I'll need some help putting some miles on the new one when it comes :devil:

 

I'd forgotten that you have another new one coming, I can't keep up :D Very happy to show you around the New Forest or, if you are up for travelling a little further and want a quieter, prettier ride then I can thoroughly recommend the roads about 20 miles further West. There are some pleasant farm shops and cafes to choose from and the scenery is proper 'English countryside'. Now I'm a man of leisure (sort of!) then I prefer mid-week but fine to work around you, just drop me a PM as and when 

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Defender
On 03/04/2021 at 16:57, baben said:

It seems to me to be a marketing ploy to divide bikes up into styles. Tourers, sports tourers, adventure, street, naked etc etc. Back when I was a lad if you wanted a sports bike to race on you put clip ons and rear sets on, home tuned the motor (easy in pre electronic days) and off you went. I recall the big divides were two versus four stroke and trials versus road bikes - which were understandable and logical divisions.  My pal still races his Daytona 500 and Tiger Cub and does tours on the Daytona as well - two up with luggage. He rides it to race meetings too on occasion. These days I want a bike that is comfortable, powerful enough to be safe and not tiring and with a decent range and that does not weigh the same as four fat Bavarians. I do not want a 7 inch TV screen and a bucket load of electronics either. It's a bike, not a penis extension. 

Hmm, I seem a bit ranty this afternoon. Better take some drugs.

It's a combination of engineering/marketing/progress/technology etc, however you don't need to retreat into your bunker/cave/hovel etc, however to get away from the progressive march you need to veer away from the 'traditional' manufactures and towards the emerging ones who have a simpler approach to things or go old school classic?  

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Xactly

The group riding I do is with an informal collection of IAM members, mostly observers and most of whom have bikes that have at least 130bhp - bikes like Kawasaki ZZR1400s and Ducati Multistrada 1260s. They are all experienced riders and like to “make progress”. I find it’s a lot easier to ride with this group on a bike that I don’t have to wring its neck to keep up. I can do it but really I prefer not to have to ride at 9.5/10 to do so.

 I also ride with a long-standing friend of mine. We both know what each other will do and we trust each other. He has a VFR and, like me, likes to use it a bit. It doesn’t even get into v-tech at 70mph. Neither of us is mental but we don’t hang about either. Neither of us rides as quickly as the off-duty bike cops that tend to ride 600cc sports bikes, members of a club who really can ride, well above my skill level. I can appreciate a simple tootle around as I used to do on my RE single, a totally different experience (neither better nor worse, just different). I don’t see it as either/or but if it came to it I’d keep the Crossrunner and sell the NC. The former can do everything the latter can but the reverse isn’t true. Each to his own.

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Rocker66
1 hour ago, Xactly said:

The group riding I do is with an informal collection of IAM members, mostly observers and most of whom have bikes that have at least 130bhp - bikes like Kawasaki ZZR1400s and Ducati Multistrada 1260s. They are all experienced riders and like to “make progress”. I find it’s a lot easier to ride with this group on a bike that I don’t have to wring its neck to keep up. I can do it but really I prefer not to have to ride at 9.5/10 to do so.

 I also ride with a long-standing friend of mine. We both know what each other will do and we trust each other. He has a VFR and, like me, likes to use it a bit. It doesn’t even get into v-tech at 70mph. Neither of us is mental but we don’t hang about either. Neither of us rides as quickly as the off-duty bike cops that tend to ride 600cc sports bikes, members of a club who really can ride, well above my skill level. I can appreciate a simple tootle around as I used to do on my RE single, a totally different experience (neither better nor worse, just different). I don’t see it as either/or but if it came to it I’d keep the Crossrunner and sell the NC. The former can do everything the latter can but the reverse isn’t true. Each to his own.

Good job that I’m not an IAM member then as obviously my little 500 wouldn’t be welcome in that company. I will definitely be sticking to riding just with Sue in future as I wouldn’t want to be a nuisance with you fast boys..

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baben
7 hours ago, Rocker66 said:

Good job that I’m not an IAM member then as obviously my little 500 wouldn’t be welcome in that company. I will definitely be sticking to riding just with Sue in future as I wouldn’t want to be a nuisance with you fast boys..

I ride with Norfolk IAM. They are quick but round here I can keep up on Baby - 300cc.....

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slowboy
7 hours ago, Rocker66 said:

Good job that I’m not an IAM member then as obviously my little 500 wouldn’t be welcome in that company. I will definitely be sticking to riding just with Sue in future as I wouldn’t want to be a nuisance with you fast boys..


I was in the southwest IAM group. I was told that my “little700” (my NCX) would struggle to keep up, so I went out with them on my 1959 Norton Dominator 99 (600cc). It didn’t seem to have any trouble keeping up with their 1150 beemers and Pan Europeans.........😈

 

Im still a member of the group in Bristol, who have a very different attitude to what you ride, I would even be welcome there on the Super Cub, amongst the sports bikes and tourers. Like everything in life you stay where your comfortable. 😁

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Xactly

Just to be clear it’s not the IAM group itself that likes to press on. Rides out with that group rightly stick to all speed limits; they often have associates along too. The group I am referring to is mainly from that group but otherwise has nothing to do with it.

As for rides out with others, eg the RS Owners back in the day when the forum group met up occasionally I always ride at whatever pace is deemed appropriate. I’m no speed crazed nutter, nor am I a riding god of any sort but in the right company and solo I like to have a spirited ride.

 

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PoppetM

I have had no problem riding with any of the forum members on here, and I am sometimes joined by one of my Paddleboard buddies on his GS. If people want to open up their engine, that's their own prerogative, I don't get a thrill out of 3 digits on the speedo. I get a thrill from seeing people still sat at the lights while I am long gone, but that's it, and I can achieve that at 30 mph safely. 

 

I still have nightmares of the ride 4 years ago to Hayling Island. We had a morning of good, progressive riding which was replaced by an afternoon of 'who's was bigger". I determined their partners must be with them for the wallets after that.

 

I was put at significant risk from one of them trying to overtake me on a bend into oncoming traffic. He is very lucky I judged what he was about to do and made space for him to take action otherwise he wouldn't be here today, and I probably would have been taken out by his bike as he parted company with it into the car's windscreen....

 

He apologised at the next stop for being at utter turnip. I ended my day with them there, and set off for home alone and wished them good luck getting back with him in one piece. Never rode with them again.  

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Andy m
35 minutes ago, PoppetM said:

... 'who's was bigger"....

 

Wood fastener struck firmly on cranium.

 

Andy

 

 

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Rev Ken

While more power can help to get out of a sticky situation, it can also get you into that situation more quickly in the first case!

 

With reference to IAM members ride outs, in the past I've seen ex police riders still riding if they were 'on duty', but not recently as IAM ar extremely strict about keeping to speed limits which has rubbed off on group rides. They are usually organised on the drop off system where the leading rider indicates to the following rider to stop and show any change of direction. That rider remains there until the 'Tail End Charlie' (TEC) wearing something distinctive comes up. So all riders, except the leader and TEC, rotate as the ride continues at the rated of the slowest rider. Within the ride there are opportunities for spirited riding between stops but I've never felt uncomfortable as I trust the riders, unlike some groups that lead less experienced riders into danger with irresponsible  riding. 

 

I'm looking forward to my next group ride as I get used to riding again! (I peel off when I've had enough as my stamina is lees than it used to be). They are always honest with what they think of my riding so I will know when to give up. I hope it isn't for some time yet!

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listener
2 hours ago, Rev Ken said:

I'm looking forward to my next group ride as I get used to riding again! (I peel off when I've had enough as my stamina is lees than it used to be). They are always honest with what they think of my riding so I will know when to give up. I hope it isn't for some time yet!

 

Carry on riding, dear sir.

But give up the perambulations to Greggs ... that's too dangerous! :lol:

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