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equesta

Dashcam Review: Innovv K1 2-channel Motorcycle DVR

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equesta

Apologies in advance for the long post, but thought I’d share my experience with installing my new dashcam on my NCX - something I wanted to do for some time, but have been putting of until now.

 

As a commuter who uses his NCX every day around London, I’ve always wanted to install a dashcam on my bike for the extra insurance against those sleepy/angry/doing makeup/on the phone cagers we deal with on the daily peak hour commute. Having had two SMIDSYs in the past, I figured it’s probably a matter of when, not if, the next one will be, so best have that little extra insurance, just in case.

 

I know there are hundreds of different options out there, but for me, the solution had to be:

  • Permanent and wired in - Plugging it in and changing batteries and switching it on and off every time I ride will get tiring.

  • Discrete  - Needed to be tucked away and just “work”. I knew this meant more work installing it, but nothing screams “rob me” than a shiny GoPro flimsily clamped onto the handlebars.

  • Not too expensive -  Enough to pay for decent quality, but not so much that it’s obvious the profit’s spent on sponsoring extreme sports and filming bikini clad girls on exotic beaches.

  • Front and back - The more coverage the better.

  • Dashcam features - Functions specific to dashcam recorders, like auto on/off, motion detection, SD card cycling, etc.


So after doing a considerable amount of research I came across the K1 Motorcycle Camera produced by Innovv. Innovv are known for developing the “808” key-fob mini camera popular with remote-control hobbyists and tin-foil-hatters over the years, and listen to their customers to further improve their products.

 

The K1 seemed to tick all the boxes:

  • A two camera system specifically designed for motorcycles

  • Reasonably discrete, but had all the functions specifically of a dashcam (e.g. motion detection, file protection, video cycling, etc)

  • Weather protection for the cameras (obviously)

  • Seems to have a decent reputation on the various forums/review sites. The manufacturer and website is based in China, but from research they offered good support and communication and were reliable. During this time I had a good communication with a nice chap named Rock who was very good with my questions, and seemed genuinely keen to support his products.



The Innovv K1 Motorcycle Camera

I ordered the K1 camera directly from the Innovv website for USD$265.00 (approx £172), which included express postage and arrived in about a week. I believe similar recorders are made by other manufacturers, but this is the only one that comes with weatherproof cameras for motorcycles.

You can find more info here: http://www.innovv.com/#!the-k1/c3r6

Some of the key headline specs:

  • 2 channel DVR with screen which can record up to 1080p 30fps simultaneously, but can independently be set at 720p to save space.

  • 2 waterproof cameras, which I was told was specially designed for motorcycles with extra mounting holes (standard tripod mounting holes)

  • GPS sensor to record position and speed

  • Control button for protecting video files and for stop/start recording

  • Motion detection, video cycling (oldest video gets overwritten when the SD Card is full), G sensor (will record G-force and write-protect the video file when it senses a lerge spike in G’s).

  • Auto start and shut-down on ignition.


Unboxing

MMgAqW4l.jpg

The K1 comes with most of the basic mounting and wiring bits you need to get started including a cigarette socket adapters and a MicroSD card USB adapter. The recording unit came with a heavy duty canvas pouch (top left) with some velcro loops, presumably to strap it into the bike frame, but I didn’t end up needing this.

 

WwM5Yqgl.jpg

The DVR unit is similar in size to a pack of cards, comes with a screen and can pulled out and run on its own (say, if you need to review it at the scene of an accident).

 

QaXJ2Iql.jpg

The left side, featuring the main inputs, front and rear video, GPS/control button and (ignition) power.

 

hu2IV5Ul.jpg

The right side, containing the MicroSD slot, USB power and mini-HDMI port.

 

The cameras were a little larger than I had imagined, but they felt very solid and seemed capable of handling the kind of weather a commuter could throw at it. They look like they were made out of a block of aluminium - or a “unibody chassis” as trendy parlance would put it.  The front camera had a 2m lead and the rear had 1m. I ended up swapping them around as it was longer to wire to the back.

 

Installation

I wanted a discrete and tidy solution, so I was prepared to spend a little more time in getting it installed properly. No point just slapping it on the sides and hope for the best that it doesn’t get nicked or knocked off. Ideally, I wanted it to be barely noticeable.

Though it wasn’t as bad as I had feared, it did still take up a good part of the day. But a lot of was down to making up the mounting rigging and being extra careful with measurements and placement.

Finally, I wanted the recording unit to be in the helmet compartment where it will be safe and dry and still be able to store my helmet and toolkit.


Rear Camera

The most difficult task was trying to mount the rear camera. Not only do I have to pull off the panels to send the cable to the front, but since I also had a R&G tail tidy on my NC, it made my mounting options very limited.

In order to wire up the recorder in the helmet compartment, I had to use the front camera, which had the longer lead, for the rear and vice versa. Both cameras are identical anyway, save for the cable length so it didn’t matter.

My best bet was to create a bracket and mount it behind the licence plate using the same screws holding the plate in. Firstly I cut about a 7” piece (slightly smaller than the width of the plate) of L-shape (23mm x 43mm) aluminium. I then drilled the 6mm holes where the licence plate screws would go and where I would mount the camera. I then (carefully) bent the camera end of the bracket upwards, to compensate for the angle of the licence plate on the tail. Finally I mounted a 1”, ¼” UNC bolt for the camera.

 

acc5F6cl.jpg

Rear camera bracket piece from an L-shape piece of aluminium, with 6mm holes drilled for the licence plate and for the camera mount (with bolt mounted). Note the bend upwards to compensate for the angel of the licence plate.

 

3XsvvGQl.jpg

And here is a side-on view of the bracket installed and the camera mounted (more pictures later). Surprisingly, the camera felt rather sturdy mounted in this position.

Once mounted, I fed the cable through the under-side of the tail tidy and into the fuel flap area. After taking the bike’s side panels off (that was no easy task, but that’s another story!), I was able to discretely wire the cable to the helmet compartment.

 

xAFAGbVl.jpg

 

jgsh5Drl.jpg

After much time and swearing involved with removing the bike’s side panels, I was finally able to wire the cables from the tail through to the helmet compartment and attached them to existing cable ties on the bike’s frame.

 

For convenience, I unmounted the 12 volt accessory socket in the helmet compartment and plugged in the included 12 volt adapter to power the unit. I then tucked the cable away in front of the maintenance lid. In the longer term, I’ll rewire it “properly” into the bike’s accessory sub-harness as it’s now a little messy with cables. But that’s for another day.

 

Front Camera

Mercifully, the front camera was much easier to install. Again, for the discrete look, I wanted to mount the front camera in the little space between the speedo and the windscreen. I was a little worried that the picture quality might be slightly worse behind the windscreen, with all its little scratches, but thought it was well worth it being neatly tucked away and protected from the weather.

Finding the adhesive mount was a little tricky and had to be as low profile as possible as to avoid hitting the windscreen. Typical “ball” type mounts were too tall, but lower profile “helmet” mounts (flat adhesive, not the curved adhesive surface for helmets) should do. You can order these separately from the Innovv site, but I borrowed the adhesive camera mount from another camera.

 

fhp0wucl.jpg

A snug, but tidy fit using the more compact adhesive camera mount.

 

A28VQ6Hl.jpg

And with the windscreen back on.

 

(Continued...)

Edited by equesta
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equesta

Recorder unit


I wanted to mount the camera on the back of the maintenance lid, where the small toolkit is stored.


Firstly, I moved the toolkit to the little compartment at the bottom where the manual would normally be kept, which was surprisingly roomy.


QYSfPyYl.jpg


With the toolkit out of the way, I then took the maintenance lid out and drilled a couple of adjacent holes on the left of the indent to allow the cables through. Followed by the recorder mounting clip secured with the included double-sided pad.


3Wm0eBhl.jpg

DVR unit mounted on the clip which was mounted to the maintenance lid with the included double-sided pad. Holes drilled on the side to allow the cables to be fed through.


IW7JUlBl.jpg

And here is the recorder in place inside the helmet compartment and wired up.



Control Button


Finally, I mounted the control button in front of the lid. The button is rather handy so that I can press it to protect a particular recording from being overwritten and long-press to manually stop or start recording.


3hYLnr6l.jpg


Finally, I didn’t end up mounting the GPS module. Primarily because I didn’t want any more clutter on the bike, but also, I’m not convinced recording the speed I’m doing will really be of any additional benefit (not that I’m breaking the law!)


Completed Pictures


It was time to put it all back together again and test it out. Here are some pictures of the camera in place (excuse the dirty bike!):


2JV2Hbdl.jpg


WvG5pTrl.jpg


74oDHERl.jpg



Testing it out


The camera comes with a removable battery (I believe the same type as used in GoPros) which should record for about 30 minutes. However, it’s really is designed to be wired to the 12v ignition supply. Thankfully, it can be set so that when you turn on your bike, it automatically turns on and starts recording when you start the bike and shuts down at the end of the journey


The K1 comes with a whole of options on its on-screen menu, such as video size and quality, flipped video (if you mount the camera up-side down like I did), motion detection. Innovv seemed to have done their research with regards to their dashcam features, such as:


  • G-sensor file protection - It will automatically protect a file when the built-in G-sensor reaches a certain threshold (ie a crash). The sensitivity can be adjustable.

  • Motion Detection - Pretty standard for dashcams, but useful if you want to save space on your SD Card

  • “Parking Mode” - When enabled, when you switch off the ignition, the recorder stays on and goes into “motion detect” mode, and records when it detects any motion, until its internal battery runs out. You could wire up external power separately to extend this time


It also had a fancy Lane Departure warning system, which I suspect this is for car use only.



This is weird...


When I turned on the ignition for the first time, the screen started to flicker and the unit reset itself. Then it would work again, until I’d rev the engine, when it would flicker and reset itself again. Assuming it was the power supply/voltage issue, I unplugged the power cables completely so it ran only on battery and the only two leads going into the unit were the cameras. But no luck - again with screen flickering and resetting.


I tried to move the camera cables around inside the bike, especially trying to avoid any other wiring, especially anything to do with the ignition. It was only after several tries and placing the cables around the airbox (as far away from any other wiring), that I got it to behave normally. I’ve let Innovv know about the issue and they said that they will keep an eye out for the problem.


However, it’s been running reliably fine ever since.

 

Videos


I was surprised how good the quality was of the video, especially of the front camera - the perspex windscreen with all its fine scratches and road dirt barely interfered with the camera. I set the front to record at 1080p but the rear at 720p to save space on the card.


The clips are stored as 2 minute segments (which can be changed to 5 or 10 minutes) and have a couple of seconds overlap between each clip, so it’s not missing out any footage.



Typical day commute through sunny Croydon

Front view:


Rear view:

 

Note: Youtube quality is a bit rubbish compared to the source files. Also the slight shake on the front camera at an angle was due to the loose mounting which I’ve since fixed.


Video quality is surprisingly good for a dashcam, and can details are pretty clear, especially licence plates.


When you insert a new card in and format it, it automatically includes a player which can be run directly off the card (on a PC), so you don’t have to faff about with players, etc. It also displays the running G-force at any point, and GPS location and speed (if you have GPS installed and enabled).


XwhOVQxl.png

 

Conclusion/TL;DR


The Innovv K1 is a great compact front and rear camera, designed for a motorcycle and really fit the bill for my requirements for a discreet and tidy solution. The unit and the cameras feel solid and well built, unlike many of the cheap generic dash/action cams you get from *that* auction site. And I’ve had a few. Once you get over the challenge of installing it on the bike, it’s really quite simple to configure and get going.


The simultaneous dual front and rear camera recording is really great as it offers a lot more coverage, and the video quality is surprisingly good and clear. The player that’s included in the card is rather handy.


I’ve had the unit for a couple of weeks now and it now “just works”. I’m now starting to forget that it’s even there - which is exactly what I wanted..


I’ve not tested it under many conditions, as I’ve only really used it on the daily commute, but I’ll update with new videos when I get the chance or go on any long runs with various conditions..



Liked

  • Front and rear simultaneous video provides great coverage.

  • Good quality video

  • Handy included player copied to the SD card (for PCs)

  • Set and forget. It’s a unit that’s exactly what I wanted - discrete and just works without having to do anything each time I ride. Also I didn’t sacrifice any space or aesthetics to install it.



Improvements

  • More mounting accessories. Motorcycles are far more fiddly to mount cameras on than cars, so could benefit from more mounting options. Their previous C3 model came with a pile of them, and in fact I had to take the front camera mount from the C3. But you could order them as extras on the website.

  • More mounting pads. For the same reasons above. Though it comes with a single spare set of fitted double-sided pads, another set would be useful if you need to reposition more than once (which could be likely after you’ve used it for a while). For example, I wouldn’t mind repositioning the control button to get it right.

  • The unit can record audio, but am not sure where from. I initially thought it was the cameras, but the microphone may be in the GPS unit,which I didn’t install. Audio would be useful, but not the end of the world.


Next steps:


Though I’m happy with the installation, there are a couple of things I’d like to fine tune now that I’ve had the chance to test it. These have nothing to do with the dashcam itself, though:


  • Wiring - Though there was plenty of room behind the maintenance lid for all my cabling, it’s still a bit of a dog’s breakfast by my standards. It was good enough to get it going initially, but I’d like to wire it up properly using a separate line to the sub-harness and put the accessory socket back in its rightful place.

  • Improved water channeling - I’ve noticed on particularly wet days, the drops of water would bead over the windscreen and then come down the back of the screen and in front of the camera. I’m trying out some adhesive rubber strips to hopefully channel away from dripping down the inside


Will keep you posted on any updates on how I go with the DVR...

Edited by equesta
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equesta

And some videos of riding in the evening (can't embed more than 2 videos per post):

 

Ride up the A3 early evening

 

Front view:


Rear view:


Note: Youtube quality is a bit rubbish compared to the source files. Also the slight shake on the front camera at an angle was due to the loose mounting which I’ve since fixed.

Edited by equesta
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Rocker66

Excellent detailed and informative posts

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fred_jb

Very useful post - thanks.  Having had a dashcam in the car for a while, I like the idea of having one (or two) on the bike.   I saw some info online about the K1, but nothing beats real world experience especially when so well documented and illustrated.

 

Fred

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nelmo

Great review and amazing quality video :)

Edited by nelmo

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RussB644

Thanks for posting that update. made for interesting reading.

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giley

This model looks good. Sonething else for my shopping list!

Good review and install.

Looking at instructions it has speed camera warnings, although a voice comming out of the frunk might get you arrested, not thst you woild hear it moving!

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Tonyj

Nice one

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rjp996

I've been looking at one of these - Thank you for the write up very helpful.

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DB1965

Apologies in advance for the long post, but thought I’d share my experience with installing my new dashcam on my NCX - something I wanted to do for some time, but have been putting of until now.

 

As a commuter who uses his NCX every day around London, I’ve always wanted to install a dashcam on my bike for the extra insurance against those sleepy/angry/doing makeup/on the phone cagers we deal with on the daily peak hour commute. Having had two SMIDSYs in the past, I figured it’s probably a matter of when, not if, the next one will be, so best have that little extra insurance, just in case.

 

I know there are hundreds of different options out there, but for me, the solution had to be:

  • Permanent and wired in - Plugging it in and changing batteries and switching it on and off every time I ride will get tiring.

  • Discrete  - Needed to be tucked away and just “work”. I knew this meant more work installing it, but nothing screams “rob me” than a shiny GoPro flimsily clamped onto the handlebars.

  • Not too expensive -  Enough to pay for decent quality, but not so much that it’s obvious the profit’s spent on sponsoring extreme sports and filming bikini clad girls on exotic beaches.

  • Front and back - The more coverage the better.

  • Dashcam features - Functions specific to dashcam recorders, like auto on/off, motion detection, SD card cycling, etc.

So after doing a considerable amount of research I came across the K1 Motorcycle Camera produced by Innovv. Innovv are known for developing the “808” key-fob mini camera popular with remote-control hobbyists and tin-foil-hatters over the years, and listen to their customers to further improve their products.

 

The K1 seemed to tick all the boxes:

  • A two camera system specifically designed for motorcycles

  • Reasonably discrete, but had all the functions specifically of a dashcam (e.g. motion detection, file protection, video cycling, etc)

  • Weather protection for the cameras (obviously)

  • Seems to have a decent reputation on the various forums/review sites. The manufacturer and website is based in China, but from research they offered good support and communication and were reliable. During this time I had a good communication with a nice chap named Rock who was very good with my questions, and seemed genuinely keen to support his products.

The Innovv K1 Motorcycle Camera

I ordered the K1 camera directly from the Innovv website for USD$265.00 (approx £172), which included express postage and arrived in about a week. I believe similar recorders are made by other manufacturers, but this is the only one that comes with weatherproof cameras for motorcycles.

You can find more info here: http://www.innovv.com/#!the-k1/c3r6

Some of the key headline specs:

  • 2 channel DVR with screen which can record up to 1080p 30fps simultaneously, but can independently be set at 720p to save space.

  • 2 waterproof cameras, which I was told was specially designed for motorcycles with extra mounting holes (standard tripod mounting holes)

  • GPS sensor to record position and speed

  • Control button for protecting video files and for stop/start recording

  • Motion detection, video cycling (oldest video gets overwritten when the SD Card is full), G sensor (will record G-force and write-protect the video file when it senses a lerge spike in G’s).

  • Auto start and shut-down on ignition.

Unboxing

MMgAqW4l.jpg

The K1 comes with most of the basic mounting and wiring bits you need to get started including a cigarette socket adapters and a MicroSD card USB adapter. The recording unit came with a heavy duty canvas pouch (top left) with some velcro loops, presumably to strap it into the bike frame, but I didn’t end up needing this.

 

WwM5Yqgl.jpg

The DVR unit is similar in size to a pack of cards, comes with a screen and can pulled out and run on its own (say, if you need to review it at the scene of an accident).

 

QaXJ2Iql.jpg

The left side, featuring the main inputs, front and rear video, GPS/control button and (ignition) power.

 

hu2IV5Ul.jpg

The right side, containing the MicroSD slot, USB power and mini-HDMI port.

 

The cameras were a little larger than I had imagined, but they felt very solid and seemed capable of handling the kind of weather a commuter could throw at it. They look like they were made out of a block of aluminium - or a “unibody chassis” as trendy parlance would put it.  The front camera had a 2m lead and the rear had 1m. I ended up swapping them around as it was longer to wire to the back.

 

Installation

I wanted a discrete and tidy solution, so I was prepared to spend a little more time in getting it installed properly. No point just slapping it on the sides and hope for the best that it doesn’t get nicked or knocked off. Ideally, I wanted it to be barely noticeable.

Though it wasn’t as bad as I had feared, it did still take up a good part of the day. But a lot of was down to making up the mounting rigging and being extra careful with measurements and placement.

Finally, I wanted the recording unit to be in the helmet compartment where it will be safe and dry and still be able to store my helmet and toolkit.

Rear Camera

The most difficult task was trying to mount the rear camera. Not only do I have to pull off the panels to send the cable to the front, but since I also had a R&G tail tidy on my NC, it made my mounting options very limited.

In order to wire up the recorder in the helmet compartment, I had to use the front camera, which had the longer lead, for the rear and vice versa. Both cameras are identical anyway, save for the cable length so it didn’t matter.

My best bet was to create a bracket and mount it behind the licence plate using the same screws holding the plate in. Firstly I cut about a 7” piece (slightly smaller than the width of the plate) of L-shape (23mm x 43mm) aluminium. I then drilled the 6mm holes where the licence plate screws would go and where I would mount the camera. I then (carefully) bent the camera end of the bracket upwards, to compensate for the angle of the licence plate on the tail. Finally I mounted a 1”, ¼” UNC bolt for the camera.

 

acc5F6cl.jpg

Rear camera bracket piece from an L-shape piece of aluminium, with 6mm holes drilled for the licence plate and for the camera mount (with bolt mounted). Note the bend upwards to compensate for the angel of the licence plate.

 

3XsvvGQl.jpg

And here is a side-on view of the bracket installed and the camera mounted (more pictures later). Surprisingly, the camera felt rather sturdy mounted in this position.

Once mounted, I fed the cable through the under-side of the tail tidy and into the fuel flap area. After taking the bike’s side panels off (that was no easy task, but that’s another story!), I was able to discretely wire the cable to the helmet compartment.

 

xAFAGbVl.jpg

 

jgsh5Drl.jpg

After much time and swearing involved with removing the bike’s side panels, I was finally able to wire the cables from the tail through to the helmet compartment and attached them to existing cable ties on the bike’s frame.

 

For convenience, I unmounted the 12 volt accessory socket in the helmet compartment and plugged in the included 12 volt adapter to power the unit. I then tucked the cable away in front of the maintenance lid. In the longer term, I’ll rewire it “properly” into the bike’s accessory sub-harness as it’s now a little messy with cables. But that’s for another day.

 

Front Camera

Mercifully, the front camera was much easier to install. Again, for the discrete look, I wanted to mount the front camera in the little space between the speedo and the windscreen. I was a little worried that the picture quality might be slightly worse behind the windscreen, with all its little scratches, but thought it was well worth it being neatly tucked away and protected from the weather.

Finding the adhesive mount was a little tricky and had to be as low profile as possible as to avoid hitting the windscreen. Typical “ball” type mounts were too tall, but lower profile “helmet” mounts (flat adhesive, not the curved adhesive surface for helmets) should do. You can order these separately from the Innovv site, but I borrowed the adhesive camera mount from another camera.

 

fhp0wucl.jpg

A snug, but tidy fit using the more compact adhesive camera mount.

 

A28VQ6Hl.jpg

And with the windscreen back on.

 

(Continued...)

Great write up  :thumbsup: gonna be very usfulfor loads of us

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equesta

Thanks for the props guys.

 

I've had dashcams in my car for a while now and it's certainly come in handy. So I jumped at the chance of installing one in my bike as soon as a decent one came on the market - especially seeing that bikes are assumed to be "at fault" nowadays, so thought I'd share my experience.

 

@giley - Yes, there's a mode on the screen which displays the GPS speed, and I think allows you to upload camera/road data, and flashes when there's a camera nearby. Naturally, it's not much good in the frunk, but if you weatherproofed the recording unit, I guess you could mount it up front. Of course, I never ever go fast enough to warrant a speed camera warning... :whistle:

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slowboy

The trouble with a dash cam is it records your misdemeanours as well. Not sure a PC would be too happy with passing a traffic island with a keep left sign on the right hand side. Probably a few points for that. Good write up though, very informative.

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R120

Nice install great placing of the front camera

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equesta

The trouble with a dash cam is it records your misdemeanours as well. Not sure a PC would be too happy with passing a traffic island with a keep left sign on the right hand side. Probably a few points for that. Good write up though, very informative.

 

Ah yes, well spotted. But I dare say probably not the crime/danger of the century compared to many other clips on YouTube. It'd be good to keep you honest or catching any bad habits I guess!

 

To be honest I'd prefer the slight risk of capturing any breaking of the highway code over having being in a hit and run with no leads or evidence.

Edited by equesta
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noj

When I ordered my C3 snake cam it took 4 weeks to arrive from him. I expressed my concern about the time frame and he asked my advice, I told him that I had bought a main stand from Webike in Japan and it arrived in 8 days, he said he would change his carrier, so it looks like he did just that if you got yours within a week.  

Also, how hot does it get?  the C3 gets very hot indeed and I have mine in the frunk.

 

I have read that the C3 production has been stopped due to a lot of them either not working right out of the box or breaking down very soon after purchase, mine has been fine up to now to be honest.

 

Regarding sound. I eventually turned the recording feature off, all I could hear is the engine and gearbox and it sounded terrible.

Edited by noj
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bazza

Thanks for that .Superb - I want one! In an ideal world the screen would also have a GPS function - so you could switch to that for normal riding, knowing that you were recording front & back at the same time.would be a bit of a lump to mount out of the frunk however with all those leads in and out.

I am sure Fred is on the case re the additional wiring needs!

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bazza

If anyone doubts the idea of a dash cam - I had a driver take out all my offside panels of the VW transporter on Saturday. Luckily I wasn't on the bike as a SUV v NC is no contest. He simply forget to turn his steering wheel- or maybe was texting etc- and crossed into my lane? If i had had a dash cam there would be NO argument on who was to blame

My door was crushed in about 6" -luckily it's a heavy duty VW so even the window is  still winding down (only 1/2 way though) But on the bike - 3 ton of SUV -i doubt if I would still be around!

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equesta

@noj - My C3 took about 3-4 weeks too, but didn't complain as this was par for the course ordering stuff from China via "standard" mail. But I think the K1 is free express delivery and mine took about a week. 

 

@bazza  - Oh no! I'm glad you're OK and it wasn't the NC. The screen does have a "GPS" mode where the display switches to a speedo of sorts and flashes when there are any warnings (e.g. speed cameras, etc). Naturally, not much use to me as it's in the frunk...

 

Yes, the volume of cables to the unit were a bit fiddly, it would be a good idea for the cables to connect to a "hub" and a single cable going to the DVR.

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Trev

The trouble with a dash cam is it records your misdemeanours as well. Not sure a PC would be too happy with passing a traffic island with a keep left sign on the right hand side. Probably a few points for that. Good write up though, very informative.

 

Apart from the fact that I can't be bothered to go to this length to install one (hats off to you Sir for a great install and 'how to guide') I'm still not a convert to cameras on bikes for two reasons;

 

the first, rather weak, reason is that I've managed 30 odd years without inflicting hours of footage on others of my trip to the shops/work/seaside/Wales/Alps/Mongolia (delete as applicable) and can quite happily continue my biking life without having to share it with people I've never met and almost certainly (should) have something better to do instead  :ahappy:

 

and secondly, I sometimes, occasionally, just maybe, when I don't concentrate, ride my motorcycle a teeny, weeny bit outside of the laws governing speed and really don't want to add to the cameras and technology already trying to record me doing so  :angel: at least not until we're forced to by big brother. It will come but I'm not going there voluntarily  :zorro:

Edited by Trev
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equesta

@noj - Sorry - I can't seem to be able to edit my posts now. I use the bike for about an hour each trip and so far no issues so far (apart from the one I identified in the review) and the unit was cold to the touch at the end.

 

@Trev - I just leave my dashcam running, which overwrites old footage after a couple of days, and I don't subject people to endless hours of footage like those people who Instagram what they had for lunch. With regards to the "occasional dynamic riding" - I hear ya  :angel:  but you can not install the GPS which records your speed. I just think the value of a dashcam in an accident would be better than the slight risk of having your indiscretions caught. Or put another way, I've had more non-fault accidents than I had fines/points (knock on wood)

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noj

Im the same with the footage, just let it overwrite and only view when needed. But I have been asked by club members to film them riding in front of me just to see themselves riding the bike. One guy actually pulled himself up on his bad road positioning and altered the way he rides.

I also have in the past taken snapshots from the footage of rides we have had over the dales, Wales and peak district.

 

Also, and im sure I have read it on here, if something bad does happen and the police want to have a look, I believe there needs to be 2 mins footage before the event and 2 mins footage after the incident, unbroken footage, something to bear in mind.

and also I carry a spare mem card in case something does happen, the card can then be taken out and kept safe and the spare card can carry on recording the rest of the ride. 

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Tigertail

Dan, just wanted to say well done on a great write up.  Just need to convince the missus now that my C3 needs to be replaced with a K1.  Need to subtly drop her a few hints before xmas maybe :whistle:

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Hati

I've managed 30 odd years without inflicting hours of footage on others of my trip to the shops/work/seaside/Wales/Alps/Mongolia (delete as applicable) a

 

Missing the point entirely!!! Dash cams are to prove "at fault" in case of an accident/cover your ass, nothing to do with advertising your exploits on the interweb.

 

Some insurance companies will give you discounted premiums if you use a dashcam.

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rjp996

Tigertail - be interesting to know if the snake camera from he C3 works with the K1, as this would give other options for desecrate install (such as the one drilled through the screen).

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