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Popular Content

Showing most liked content on 22/01/19 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Totally agree on carbs, horrible things with diagnosis by guessing and parts swapping because there is no practical physical test. Give me a blink code and multimeter over some old boy doing the tweak here, quarter turn there, sounds OK routine without knowing some bit of rubber is leaking. You have to praise Lexmoto for encouraging home maintenance. Was that on a UK site? Getting people to understand the machinery and not treat them as disposable black boxes full of demons I think is better for everyone and makes the ownership experience better. Getting over the fear of the orange vest clip board crowd and their US lawyers is a step in the right direction too. Andy
  2. 1 point
    It seems strange that 125s are allowed to use carburettors. Presumably they don't have to comply with Euro 4? By the way, why they suggest that carbs are better from a maintenance point of view is beyond me. I think it's the exact opposite: FI is completely maintenance free and extremely reliable. On the rare* occasion it fails, it's actually much easier: just replace whatever the fault code tells you. Carburettors, on the other hand, have moving parts that wear or stick, jets that block, needle valves that leak, diaphragms that tear, and screws that just beg to be adjusted (maladjusted, I should say). I think carbs are used because it's still cheaper to make a carb than an FI system, not because they are easier to maintain. *In 46 years of motorcycling and motoring I've never had a fuel injection failure.
  3. 1 point
    Don't agree at all. I always moan about the dire lack of innovation in motorcycles, and I take my hat of to Yamaha for developing this. As for it's looks - well, I've never been that bothered by looks anyway, and actually I think the parallelogram stuff at the front looks really cool. As for the rest of it, well, who cares? Most people, probably, but not me. The extra safety and stability at the front end was mentioned by every rider in the video, and I'd love that; fear of falling off limits how I ride in corners, and I'd appreciate anything that makes me feel safer and less likely to drop it. I think it's brilliant and - crucially for me - it dares to be different (Yamaha's unofficial tag line). As such I would buy one tomorrow if I had the money.
  4. 1 point
    It's classed as a motorcycle due to the distance between the front wheels. This is the day I rode it.
  5. 1 point
    Should read “that’ll teach you to buy cheap Chinese electrical products built to a price by under paid workers in a sweat shop to a German over see’r “ :0)
  6. 1 point
    Bleeding. I think it depends a bit. The Integra has the rear master cyl on the handlebars so the brake line layout is completely different to the S/X. As a principle I usually do the short run first, so on my Integra I do the front first then the rear. On my Deauville I do the rear first then the front, but that isn't ABS so another variable anyway. To be perfectly honest I doubt it makes a huge difference either way, as long as you bleed them effectively. I always recommend a vacuum type bleeder because you can get a steady flow of fluid which will be much more effective at purging any air than trying to pump it intermittently using the master cylinder. If in doubt I will go back and repeat the process, with a vac bleeder it is so quick and easy you can justify repeating. There are various vac bleeders on the market. Personally I have a Mityvac because I also use it for other vac/pressure testing purposes, but there are other dedicated vac brake bleeders around at modest cost, well worth the investment IMO.
  7. 1 point
    I really don't get all the fuss about Honda's switch gear, it's simple to adapt to it, easy to change if you really can't get on with it or just buy a different bike! I thought my wife would have trouble with three things when she got the CB500, 1 the switchgear, 2 the gear change ( bit stiff new) and 3 the side stand location, none of which were a problem as it turned out, when I asked about the switch gear she said she had worked it out within 2 miles. I also think riders don't use the horn enough, I'm on it all the time to alert dozy car drivers and I get a lot of two fingers and other hand gestures but at least they've seen/heard me. The more you use it the more natural it becomes. I think the 'peep peep' horns manufacturers fit to bikes are ridiculous and always fit Denali sound bombs.
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