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  1. Tex

    Tex

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 09/04/21 in all areas

  1. 17 points
    My RNineT Sport landed home on Saturday. It's a 2016 model with less than 3k miles. The Sport was a 2016 only dealer option classic with heated grips, seat hump and high level Akrapovic exhaust as standard. And so the farkling began. I put on the Dart screen, bar-end mirrors and front crud catcher so far. Cylinder head protectors and hugger still to go. It's my first experience of a boxer twin, and it's true what they say, it is unique. It's not as smooth as my CBF1000 was, on start up it gives a shake when you rev it. But I believe they call that "character". It's hard for me to describe, the fact it's not as smooth as other bikes, it feels more involving to ride. It is gorgeous to ride round the country roads, and the sound is sublime. It's not even the most comfortable bike I've ever ridden, ok for a hour or so. But here's the thing, when riding it and when I catch my reflection in big shop windows, it's how it makes me feel, and no bike has done that for me before.
  2. 16 points
    I'm a big fan of the CB500 and own a 2016 "F". Having had plenty of time on the "X" model, be it test rides or loan bikes, I really prefer the bar height and riding position it offers over the "F". So as a little project I set about converting my bike using all Honda parts ( not cheap) Stock bike with Puig small fly screen. Cables approx 2 inches longer. During surgery. Handlebar difference. All fitted complete with new MRA screen. Just waiting on the longer "X" brake hose which is back ordered but got around it with a bit of jiggery pokery for now, the MOT man was happy so all good. For me anyway it's a much more comfortable relaxed riding position and the MRA screen is very effective.
  3. 16 points
    It seems like, for the first time in my life, I'm going to know what it's like to have a brand new bike, two in fact. Just paid the second instalment on these babies:
  4. 16 points
  5. 14 points
    Sue and I went to the 1066 for lunch today where there were several bikes. These were my favourite two. I had a most enjoyable and interesting chat with the owner of the BSA500who had rebuilt 7 years ago and used it regularly since
  6. 14 points
    So, after my little heart incident 18 months ago I thought my big bike riding days were over and sold my CBF1000 GT. I downsized to a BMW F800r. I kept that for 6 months, fed up cleaning the chain and rear wheel and bought a new Forza 300. Now the Forza 300 is a brilliant scooter. It's quick, economical, weather protection is second to none, carries everything I need and for my commute meets my needs 100%. But, as my health improved so did my longing for a last "proper" bike. So with a slight reluctance I sold my Forza. I will for sure when the time is right return to one. I did all my research for a bike that would put a smile on my face now. My priorities where no chain and not too tall for me. So I bought a RNineT Sport. It's a beautiful bike just to sit and look at, riding it is a bonus. Only problem is it's not a bike to ride the commute in the rain so will probably buy a 125 scooter as a hack and back to two bikes again!
  7. 13 points
    Had a busy day Sunday. Husband was out of the way so I took the opportunity to tackle the job of adding her colour coded (obviously) mudguards. Had one false start on this when reading the instructions on delivery I realised there were some fixings missing so I have had to wait for them to post them out to me and all I could do was fit the folding pedal (another win). Good grief, what an exercise! The good news is I now know how to remove the brakes at both ends (and more importantly put them back on) and also how to release the hub gears in order to remove the rear wheel. Glad to say she still folds, still has working brakes and gears. Thank goodness for YouTube videos, because the instructions enclosed may as well have been in another language. All without a responsible adult
  8. 12 points
    Hi A little story. Yesterday I decided to do a valve check and oil and filter change on the NC. Stripped it down checked the valves ( all except one was in spec) built it up, about to put the rad on and I thought, drain the oil breather tube while access is good pulled the bung drained the tube, that's when things went wrong I couldn't find the bung. I took the bottom hose to make sure it hadn't fallen in there luckily the Rocker cover was already on so no danger of it falling in the engine. I spent about 21/2 hours looking for, no joy, so decided to build it all up change the oil and filter then have another look. Spent another hour looking still no joy. This morning emptied the garage still no joy, but then as I was putting my spanner tray back I thought another look won't do any harm and there it was nestled under the 17m spanner 🥳 I'd already had the spanners out. So all in all just short of 2 hours to do the work and 4+ hours looking for the bloody bung🤬. At least I know it's not in the engine and I now have a tidy garage. 😄
  9. 12 points
    A previous thread on this topic was very useful and made me consider this subject more carefully. It was particularly timely because my wife Anne is going to buy a new car to replace her nearly 9 year old Fiat 500 TwinAir. Her mother wanted her to have a new car from the inheritance she left when she died recently. She also kindly left our boys a Bank of Grandma gift to go towards a deposit when they buy a house, bless her, so we are very grateful to her. Anyway this gave us the not unpleasant problem of choosing the replacement car and the EV options were duly considered. We wanted something a bit bigger than the Fiat as our other vehicle will be a camper van which is not necessarily ideal for all of our longer journeys. We were quite keen on a totally electric car at first, and have explored the idea of a personal lease to offset concerns about being left with outdated tech if we were to buy, but we are still concerned about the range and charging issues, though I accept that the the charging infrastructure will improve. However, at present it seems a mish-mash of different standards and different charging network suppliers all using different apps and needing separate payment accounts. There is also a fairly limited choice of cars. In the end we both felt it was too soon to go for this option. At the other end of the scale, we also looked at the so-called mild or self-charging hybrids, but these seem a little half-hearted with the small battery only really providing assistance to the petrol engine, so just allowing smaller and marginally more efficient engines to be fitted, so we quickly dismissed this option. This left the plug-in hybrid, and this is what we decided to go for, even though generally they are quite a bit more expensive than the petrol only versions of the same cars and not much cheaper, if at all, than a fully electric car. However the car will be used mostly for short local journeys where we can use it in battery only mode and recharge at home overnight. We then have the petrol engine for longer journeys, which to us is the ideal compromise solution at the moment. We have ruled out any cars with CVT gearboxes, so that disqualifies the Ford Puma and a few others. We quite liked the Kia offerings, not least for the 7 year warranty, but these and the Hyundai sister brand seem to have a relatively low spec platform with 104 bhp ICE and 50 kW electric motor, while being no cheaper than the more powerful competition. We also looked at the Mercedes A class hybrid as the badge had a superficial attraction, and to be fair they are the best specced plug in hybrid at the moment and not significantly more expensive than other equivalents. I liked this, but Anne found it too dark and enclosed inside with quite shallow side windows and raked screen making visibility seemingly poor, though that is something you could probably get used to. The other main option, unless I have missed something, is the VW group offerings, which are all very similar in terms of spec and list price, but implemented somewhat differently in cars from VW, Skoda, Audi and Seat. I think some models give you multiple modes and complex options to choose from for things like how much regenerative braking you want but Anne does not want anything too complicated. We watched reviews of all but the Skoda, and it seems that VW have gone overboard on removing all physical buttons meaning that you have to delve into sub-menus via a touchscreen to change anything, while the Audi A3 seems to be a bit on the sporty side with hard suspension, and the ugliest front grill I have ever seen. It looks all out of proportion as if the front end of one of the big executive models has been grafted onto the back end of a modestly sized hatchback. That left the Skoda which did not appeal to Anne, and the Seat Leon which did appeal as she had liked a previous Seat she had owned. We then looked on Autotrader's new cars listing to see what these cars, all with list prices around £32k or higher are actually selling for. The Seat immediately stood out, as while the other were being discounted by about £2k max, many dealers had offers on the Seat for £8k or so below list price. We went to the nearest Seat dealer but they maintained that they could not match those prices. Having searched a bit more on Autotrader I found that they were actually offering two cars themselves at just over £24k. We then did an online enquiry for one of these and went back today for a test drive in their demonstrator. We both liked the car very much. Very quiet and comfortable even over broken road surfaces and very nippy, even on electric only power. It is also very well equipped, and the only thing missing from the FR spec car they were selling that we would have liked was a reversing camera, though it has front and rear parking sensors. The upshot is that after haggling them up on the initially poor trade-in on the Fiat, and rejecting all the unwanted add-ons like GAP insurance and extensions to the standard 3 year warranty, we signed on the dotted line and collect it next Wednesday. it is the grey colour so just like this one:
  10. 11 points
    If anything, I might be tempted to go back to my roots with an interesting car (they do exist you know😆). Or go the whole hog, put my money where my mouth has been and get myself a Tesla Model 3 long range. Strangely theSuper Cub really can do everything I need a bike for, including the touring thing. I’m retired, I don’t need to go fast. Even when I did used to have to go fast, it always seemed like someone was faster 😂 the older I get the faster I used to be. If only I could get a daylight MOT for this baby and yes, that is a much younger me in an ex F1 Forti.😎. My talent sadly was on a beach with its mates 😂
  11. 10 points
    I can only speak for myself, but I just like a regular change. I have to say that since I started buying very good condition 20+ year old bikes, I’ve “discovered” that the bikes from 20 years ago are just as dynamically capable as today’s bikes and they don’t wear out half as quick as we might think. My entire “fleet” cost me less than £7k and excluding the Super Cub which was new but heavily discounted, I’d put them up against their modern equivalent at any time. take the Fazer, cracking performance for a 600, adjustable suspension front and rear, decent economy, 48 to 60 mpg, comfortable, decent protection and utterly awesome brakes, that lack ABS admittedly, and good ergonomics with fine handling. All for under £2k, less than the first year depreciation of most new bikes. What’s not to like? 😁
  12. 9 points
    The guy who played God in a movie once said, when asked how to end racism, "Stop talking about it". I suggest you all take heed.
  13. 9 points
    Time to say goodbye to my Honda XBR 500. It is going to it's new owner end of next week, good news is his money is coming to my bank account end of next week. Andy.
  14. 9 points
    If your dealer can keep your new bike running, they can keep something like my Fazer or SV650 running, the maintenance is absolutely no more onerous than a modern bike. No special knowledge or skill is required. I only work on mine because I enjoy it. It’s not like maintaining an old Brit bike, which frankly can be best dealt with by dropping a fag in the tank an giving it 10 minutes before ringing the emergency services 😎 then buying something more modern with the insurance money.......😂
  15. 8 points
    They say that the past is a different place. It certainly was!
  16. 7 points
    I as a pro who bleeds brakes a LOT don't piss with the bleed valves I had to sort a couple of bikes with issues with this type of system and the owners pissing about with brakes If it is not broke don't fix it ! please don't fix it until it is broken! If you want to play and want quick and easy bleeding get a vacuum bleeder they work !
  17. 7 points
    😁 I went to one once, not been back 😉
  18. 7 points
    Trev, we should get together and visit a BMW dealership. It's very entertaining to watch people already riding pristine perfectly capable bikes swapping them for a newer model with an extra farkle or two or just a different colour. The best part is that free coffee makes a mornings entertainment great value.
  19. 7 points
    I am so with you on this, @Tex. My bikes are in storage as I prepare to move house, and I'm increasingly contemplating selling both, and then after I've moved seeing if I fancy another motorcycle. Part of my problem is that so very few bikes really float my boat these days. Styling seems to be the number one concern for buyers and manufacturers, and for me that's the least important part of a bike. Plus, as you know, I frequently rant about all the stupidity that style-over-function brings: exposed chains, non-functioning or missing mudguards, zero protection against salt and grit, ridiculous number of nooks and crannies which are a nightmare to clean, and so on. Plus virtually all bikes have high-revving engines (the NC being a notable exception) with very little character, and really I want something where I can feel and hear the mechanical bits, and which gives gobs of pulsing torque. I guess a few cruisers fit that bill? But that's about it. Maybe the Bonnie 1200? As you all know, I've struggled with clinical depression for over forty years, but at the moment my mental health has been pretty stable. However, I would say one thing, Tex, which you already know but I want to emphasise: don't make any important decisions while your mental health is dodgy, even if you feel OK that day, because even though you think you've arrived at a reasonable and logical decision, you cannot trust it. Mental health colours and distorts everything: even logic and reason. So I would urge you to defer making any big decisions. The good thing is that, when it comes to motorbikes, you can always just buy another. So even if you get it wrong, you can always fix it later.
  20. 7 points
    Not only the sexism, but the English doesn't really bear scrutiny either. I think the word the copywriter was looking for but failed to find was consign rather than confine!
  21. 7 points
  22. 7 points
    You’re dangerously close to having held on to the 500X too long. What do I mean? Well, it’s value is dropping (obviously) and the cost of new bikes is rocketing. Before long the gap becomes too wide to manage. In my case, for example, what I could hope to get for Percy is less than half the cost of, say, a Tiger 900. That makes it impossible. So I’m ‘stuck’ with him. Not terrible, because I invested a lot of time, thought (and money) into making him the best version of himself he can possibly be. So, if you want a new bike, this could be your last chance of affording one.
  23. 7 points
    I am a convert to light full face. Spent years wearing a noisy, leaky, steamed up lump of a Shuberth for the convenience of not taking it off in petrol stations. I always had an open face or jet for days I couldn't face it. My first HJC was a revelation. Pay at the pump cured the need to talk to anyone while wearing it. To me you need to buy on fit. Forget protection unless there are two that fit comfortably and one scores better. If you do crash a lot you need training not a thicker or more expensive lump of polystyrene on your head. They should feel comfortable in the showroom, forget ******s about bedding in from salesman who don't have the right size in stock. They should not mist up and you should be able to see as much as you can without it by moving your eyes. You can only hope journalists were honest and/or forum members got one before you regarding noise. Slight variations in their ability to do the hangman's job doesn't worry me but lighter tends to be more comfortable. Comfort is a huge safety factor if you plan to ride for more than a few hours. Andy
  24. 7 points
    Did you clear this with Poppet first? Sam usually copyrights her image!
  25. 6 points
    A bike soon to be imported to the UK is the Royal Enfield 350 Meteor, already released in USA and India, could be that back to basic bike I want. Lots of Youtube Vids now on line. A good run a round is the Suzuki Address 110. It ticks all of the boxes I require, Kick starter back up and electric starter, auto transmission, fully enclosed belt drive, very easy DIY servicing, screw and locknut tappet adjustment, a real metal key with the Suzuki lock shield, Tubeless tyres, old school speedo and fuel gauge. Storage space for crash helmet. Lockdown has taught me to stay local and enjoy open space, a small thumper bike and a cheap runner round scooter is what I need, plus maybe an ex-mobility van with a ramp to transport us to far off lands.
  26. 6 points
    Fred, despite being a big fan of EVs, I’d absolutely agree with you about the charging infrastructure, it’s much better than it was but it’s still at best mediocre unless you’ve got a Tesla. I think the biggest barrier to entry setting aside the purchase price, which is still too steep, is the non Tesla charging infrastructure. It’s getting better at a very quick rate, but is probably about 2 to 3 years away from being at best acceptable. The other issue is the third gen battery technology that’s coming shortly from a number of manufacturers that will seriously up the charging rates. There is a new golf sized hatchback due for delivery next year from BYD in China that should be able to add 90 miles of range in 5 minutes and have a range of 600kms (380 miles). I think we will finally buy our first EV in about 18 months to 2 years or so. It’s still a bit early yet.
  27. 6 points
    Love it ❤️. Best idea I've seen for ages 👍 Now get rid of the silly manga style cocked up pillion seat and tell me you want to sell it 😁😁😁😁👍👍👍😁😁. Also, apply for a job at Honda and tell them the real world sent you. Andy
  28. 6 points
    I agree 100%. Bikes just live a lot longer nowadays and the pace of development has slowed so than they don't get outdated so quickly. I bought my 2006 SV650 five years ago for less than two grand with 15k miles. It also came with a load of useful accessories (luggage system, Nitron shock, etc) It has only needed routine maintenance and tyres, brake pads, etc, no more than a new machine would have required. I've done 30k miles on it so if I scrapped it tomorrow I'd have had my money's worth. But I expect to be riding it for a good few more years.
  29. 6 points
    It seems that <a certain viral infection> has led to some cut-backs ...
  30. 6 points
    Might need to do a bit more exercise to carry off that cat suit though....
  31. 6 points
    OK my decision is made and done . Today i paid and ordered Shad SH36 Panniers (A pair in Carbon 2x36 litres) 1x Sh39 Top Box (Carbon 39 litres) and all the fittings required , They are being delivered tomorrow (monday) all for the princely sum of £580 .A full luggage set a hell of a lot cheaper than Honda ........ Thank you everyone for your input it helped a lot on my decision
  32. 5 points
    Well that's you well and truly back in the fold and firing on all cylinders!
  33. 5 points
    itz goad two sea yo bake Meister Blagg. Eye two halve tissues wiv auto smell. Eye fink eats tacking the peas. 😇
  34. 5 points
    I'm feeling sooo much better now we've a little more freedom Glendon - we both are. And I suspect many others are feeling the same? 😁😁
  35. 5 points
    ...... and well done for waiting until you found a matching coloured car to photograph it with
  36. 5 points
    I see this thread is still going - so thought I'd update. We are running at well over 250K miles now.... I'd show a picture of the speedo, but its been replaced twice early on as there were recalls - the mileage is logged for business purposes, hence stating and knowing the current figure. The speedo on the bike just now is showing just over 200K miles. This week has been quite quiet for bike work (we also have a van), but after today's run - Newmarket to Whitchurch (horse embryo transfer) I'll have done ~1200 miles so far this week. FYI Ride mag did a feature on the bike a few months ago in the high mileage heros feature TTFN...
  37. 5 points
    Lately I have been giving a lot of though as to which way my motorcycling should go. The CB500X is a very good bike like most could be improved. so far I have it down to 3 options. Option 1 I have booked a test ride on the new NC750X to see if the modifications will change the bits that I didn’t like about my previous model. The main drawback with this option is that to set it up in the same trim as as the CB would mean the cost would between £9k to £10k. Option2 Uprate the suspension on my current bike front and rear as this is the bikes weakest point Option3 Keep the bike as it is for this year and wait to see if they bring out an improved version for 2022.
  38. 5 points
    A terrifying lack of understanding of how stress raisers work. All those cold bends where the tube collapses will turn to toilet roll inner when corroded and/or hit by anything. The steering input required screams not straight to me too. Is the seat held in by gravity? I'd hire him to built a car port though, the fabrication skills are there. Andy
  39. 5 points
    I definitely did not wash them to death 😂
  40. 5 points
    I used to deal with Cannon BMW when they were in Chelmsford several years ago but if I'm being totally honest it was mainly because I had 'the hots' for the bosses wife [Veronica Cannon] and we got on really well. I found out later that her and Bill divorced so I could have tried my luck after all....
  41. 5 points
    My GF has a 24 year old Honda VFR and just takes it to a mechanic when something needs to be done. Just because it's a bit older doesn't mean you need roadside tinkering skills. There is probably less to go wrong than a bike filled full of sensors, electonics etc.. It has less than half the miles of my 6 year old bike... The bike probably gets more admiring glances and discussion than the latest shiny thing. I think the forum has decided for you to keep the 500X. ;-) All that money in the bike fund will have to go on shocks, coffee and cake.
  42. 5 points
    Like the NC but want something different? There's a Vultus NM4 for sale near me on Gumtree. https://www.gumtree.com/p/honda-motorbikes/automatic-motorcycle-honda-vultus-nm4-/1402740394
  43. 5 points
    Until cars are FULLY automated, then drivers will need to retain skills to take over and make the right decisions when things go wrong. That requires constant practice and attention at all times. With automation drivers lose, or never acquire, levels of skill required and concentration is difficult when the driver has no input over long periods of time. Large automatic manufacturing processes with just a few employees to take the necessary action when things go wrong have shown it necessary to have all sorts of methods of keeping operators on their toes. Perhaps something like a development of the dead man's handle on trains and trams for semi-automatic cars should be introduced to at least guarantee drivers have to keep 'engaged', even if they don't have eh experience to make he right decisions. In view of my age I'm glad I won't be forced to 'drive' an automated vehicle before I hang up my driving gloves. I still practice double declutching and heel and toeing on crash gearboxes. THAT is what I enjoy and so long as I don't injure anybody, I'll continue to be happy.
  44. 5 points
    That’s typical isn’t it , Honda making out they make products that last .... only 4 years old that’s nothing I’ve got underpants that saw the queen crowned and dust sheets that still seem to have loads of dust in them , bloody marketing men. Hope it fixes it though good luck
  45. 5 points
    Here are a couple of photos of the luggage fitted
  46. 5 points
    I regularly run to the red on my Nc700s, I usually refill at about 230 to 240 miles done on the tank but only manage to get about 12 to 13 litres in so I guess there’s at least 1 litre left in there which would probably do another 20 or so miles.
  47. 5 points
    Hi, Steve. I had to put it on the dyno because I have taken off all the road gear, inc ABS. air box,+ race exhaust. I haven't ridden a bike for 17 years since head butting a wall at Kirkmicael in the 2004 TT 1000 Production race. Due to my brain injury, I have no co-ordination and my left ankle is fused. So the only way for me to ride was an auto bike, only on the track. Hence Project NC750. I have saved a lot of weight, now cutting off the heavy rear sub frame. Shortening original tank turning it around over the engine, to get more weight forward. Making a alloy seat mounting bracket . Fitting CBR600RR tank cover and race seat. Dropped the front forks 35mm to quicken the steering up and get more weight on the front. Might try to jack the back up a little, to get the ground clearance back ? i've lost from dropping the front down. Then we will try a small track day at a Kart circuit and see if I don't die. I have about 50hp at the moment, no more is required. More weight off would be nice, but I think the engine is heavy. Mag wheels next maybe. Thank you to the Forum for all you help and advice. Alive and laughing. Nick Turner Ashburton, Devon
  48. 5 points
    Dear Andy, Now back in workshop. I have had a count of the sensor signal plates. Front 60 rear 50 Front tyre 120/70 17 rear tyre 160/60 17 New front tyre should have rolling circumference of 1884mm new rear tyre should have a rolling circumference 1959mm I need to research Honda contacts to see if there is a way to run ABS on dyno, as all bike have ABS now, there must be a cheat ? Done some research, Honda workshop box disables ABS to do dyno run. Healtech do a box for £65, that takes the ABS out. I have now proved it on dyno, works perfectly in all modes D,S,AT,MT. Now taken complete ABS off the bike and still working perfectly. Will report about dyno work, don't know how you show videos or photos sorry. Thanks for all your help and information. Nick Turner
  49. 4 points
    Just needs a few farkles ...
  50. 4 points
    On my 2012 NC700SA in 'The Picos' Northern Spain back in 2018, fully loaded with 40 litres of SW MOTECH luggage and my GF on the pillion seat. I had a planned fuel stop at Potes but we got diverted because of a road closure just 10 miles outside Potes. The diversion took me over mountains and many windy roads all beautiful but with the red light flashing the whole time. When I eventually reached that fuel stop at Potes (going in from the other direction) I had clocked up another 65 miles. I will never worry about running out of fuel again on this bike. Its amazing! Needles to say, I brimmed it with 13.98 litres.... out of a possible 14.1. So, I still had a bit more.
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