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Puncture Repair Kits


ncmf

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Hi

 

After two years puncture free, I have had 2 in a week.  The year before the NC I had 7 in a year!

 

I am looking to buy a kit, anyone got any recommendations?

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Seven in a year, that's a lot where you live next to the nail factory. I'll be interested to know what forum members like, I'm going touring on the continent in July and need something to take.

Edited by PNE
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I have had Puntcure Safe in my tyres for last 20 years in all makes of bikes, and it works,don't listen to people saying its no good, IT IS, believe me.I have a couple of nails in tyres over the years and still left then there till the the tyre wore out.I had a bolt Pearce the tyre once, yes it ruined the tyre,yes I lost some air but I stayed up right and not crash the bike..Yes It's in NC 750 x ..Ride Safe..

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glencoeman

Try not to ride too close to the nearside of the road - that's where all the screws and nails end up after falling from builders vans.

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Thats my problem. Riding in London, the filtering will always take you near all the crap

  • Like 1
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dandemann8

I use Oko Tyre Sealent, yes I know it's not been past for the open road and is for agricultural use but I've used Slime and it's next to useless. A 1litre bottle will do four tyres and works like a dream..... :thumbsup:

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Guest EasyTiger

As a precaution, I today filled my tyres with a bottle of Goop tyre sealant.
(Valve core tool in cap of bottle.) Easy peasy - with valve at 8 o'clock position, remove core, let deflate, squirt in a half bottle through tube in cap.

Replace core, reinflate. Er, that's it...
If it's as good as Stan's No Nails on my push bikes, I will be pleased...

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Rev Ken

As a precaution, I today filled my tyres with a bottle of Goop tyre sealant.

(Valve core tool in cap of bottle.) Easy peasy - with valve at 8 o'clock position, remove core, let deflate, squirt in a half bottle through tube in cap.

Replace core, reinflate. Er, that's it...

If it's as good as Stan's No Nails on my push bikes, I will be pleased...

The use of tyre sealants is a hotly debated subject! Unless I was more conscientious than I am and did a thorough examination of both tyres before every ride, I wouldn't use it. If you are unlucky to pick up a nail, or in my case just two weeks ago, a piece of slate, while at first the goo might well seal the puncture, in time the nail can cause further damage; water may get in and start further damage, and it will cost you a new tyre, or in the worst case, sudden failure with the possibilty of an 'off'. Edited by Rev Ken
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That got me thinking how severe would a sudden deflation be in normal commute type riding?  A fully flat tyre would be be quite stable on the straight when going at a reasonable speed as the centrifugal force of the rubber overcomes the weight of the bike, so as long as you werent cornering you would certainly survive it and may not even notice a flat for a while.

 

I noticed this after my puncture, as I rode on a fully flat a very short distance to get to a pump.

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Guest EasyTiger

 

As a precaution, I today filled my tyres with a bottle of Goop tyre sealant.

(Valve core tool in cap of bottle.) Easy peasy - with valve at 8 o'clock position, remove core, let deflate, squirt in a half bottle through tube in cap.

Replace core, reinflate. Er, that's it...

If it's as good as Stan's No Nails on my push bikes, I will be pleased...

The use of tyre sealants is a hotly debated subject! Unless I was more conscientious than I am and did a thorough examination of both tyres before every ride, I wouldn't use it. If you are unlucky to pick up a nail, or in my case just two weeks ago, a piece of slate, while at first the goo might well seal the puncture, in time the nail can cause further damage; water may get in and start further damage, and it will cost you a new tyre, or in the worst case, sudden failure with the possibilty of an 'off'.

 

Yes, it may well be that carcass damage could occur... However, a number of riders simply replace a tyre if they have a puncture in any event. I am thinking of it as a first line of defence - possibly a visual alert too if there's a splash of green on the tyre or ground. 

When I remember, and I'm trying to make it automatic, I walk round the bike while putting my gloves on, inspecting what I can see...

I have done this hundreds of times and recently was surprised for the first time to see a flint sticking out of the tread, ready to cause a puncture...

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I always look at the bits visible to me when standing, about a third of the tyre.  A proper inspection is a hassle without a centre stand.

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michael

I've cobbled together my own kit over the years. A 12V "palm," sized compressor from Aerostich and a collection of plugs and glue, along with reamer and "pusher in thingie," device. All tested on old tires, so I know what to expect on the side of the road. Each year I go and buy a new tube of glue for about $2. I keep patches for those of my riding friends who ride with tubed tired.

While I tried the canisters of compressed air, too many are required for the average sized tire, and when you're out, you're out.

Thus, the hand held compressor and it's endless supply of air.

Fits in the bottom of the frunk and I rarely think about it until it's required. m

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Rev Ken

That got me thinking how severe would a sudden deflation be in normal commute type riding?  A fully flat tyre would be be quite stable on the straight when going at a reasonable speed as the centrifugal force of the rubber overcomes the weight of the bike, so as long as you werent cornering you would certainly survive it and may not even notice a flat for a while.

 

I noticed this after my puncture, as I rode on a fully flat a very short distance to get to a pump.

I've had three blow-outs, but of tubed tyres. Fortunately tubeless tyres are far less likely to have a 'blow-out. The first was a back tyre and I I wasn't aware of it until I came to a curve. I was travelling at around 80mph (before NSLs were introduced!) and I found it quite hard to persuade the bike to change course. It felt as if I had locked my steering damper. I started to slow down and remembered I had heard a strange noise a little earlier, and looking over the handlebars it dawned on me that all was not well. I decided to let the bike coast until the wheel rim hit the road and then bail out. To my surprise I was down to 20mph before things got really hairy and more by good luck than skill I managed to get on to a grass verge and stay upright. It was only a couple of weeks later I heard that same sound and my bike started to snake - this time it was my rear tyre. No problem I thought. Just slam on the front brake to transfer as much weight on to the front wheel and I'll be in control until the speed is low. Wrong - the rear wheel rim hit the road at around 40mph and I was all over the place, but fortunately there was no other traffic and no damage was done as we came to rest in the horizontal position on a wide grass verge. The third blow-out was just a couple of days later caused by a faulty Dunlop replacement rear tyre. I wasn't travelling fast and stopped without falling off. I go my money back, but have never fitted a Dunlop tyre on any of my bikes ever since.

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Guest phatstorage

The use of tyre sealants is a hotly debated subject! Unless I was more conscientious than I am and did a thorough examination of both tyres before every ride, I wouldn't use it. If you are unlucky to pick up a nail, or in my case just two weeks ago, a piece of slate, while at first the goo might well seal the puncture, in time the nail can cause further damage; water may get in and start further damage, and it will cost you a new tyre, or in the worst case, sudden failure with the possibilty of an 'off'.

I use goop and ride In London all year round, picked up a screw a few months ago but not a problem, rode on it until it wore away leaving a gap for air to come out. Incidentally, I don't see how water can get into a deflating tyre as the air wants to come out more than the water wants to get in.

I have a puncture repair kit with the rubber mushrooms, I rode the bike on the plug for another 1600 miles where I then traded the bike in, didn't lose any air in that time.

Need to get some more goop for the new set.

Placebo, good luck charm, early warning system, real trouble saver? Whatever, I'd rather use it for what it costs and continue riding a reliable bike. 2 punctures in 15 years.

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Dave H

I had a rear tyre wear down to the cords on the very abrasive North Norway roads but was lucky to find a snowmobile garage near the Finnish border who got me a replacement (took an hour to get there).

 I learnt some very colourful Norwegian swear words as this chap got covered in the sealant that I'd put in before the trip.

After that I lugged an old BMW OEM kit about with me which I used, to good effect, on 3 or 4 occasions.   It got me to a dealer, going steady, where I got a replacement tyre.

The little air bottles aren't much use on a big bike but can get you to a service station usually.

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  • 1 month later...
Guest andy23537

i carry the BMW motorcycle Tyre repair kit. it contains a set of tools plugs and small compressed air canisters

i have only had to use it once but works very well it wont pump your tyre up fully but enough for a ride to the local garage to top up the air.the canisters and plugs can then be replaced online

 

hope this helps. 

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